<PAGE>
 
  AS FILED WITH THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ON SEPTEMBER 30, 1998
                                                       REGISTRATION NO. 333-
- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
                            WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
                                ---------------
                                   FORM S-4
                            REGISTRATION STATEMENT
                                     UNDER
                          THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933
                                ---------------
                            HMC MERGER CORPORATION
      (EXACT NAME OF REGISTRANT AS SPECIFIED IN ITS GOVERNING INSTRUMENT)
         MARYLAND                    7011                    53-0085950
     (STATE OR OTHER          (PRIMARY STANDARD           (I.R.S. EMPLOYER
       JURISDICTION               INDUSTRIAL            IDENTIFICATION NO.)
   OF INCORPORATION OR       CLASSIFICATION CODE
      ORGANIZATION)                NUMBER)
                              10400 FERNWOOD ROAD
                           BETHESDA, MARYLAND 20817
                                (301) 380-9000
  (ADDRESS, INCLUDING ZIP CODE, AND TELEPHONE NUMBER, INCLUDING AREA CODE, OF
                   REGISTRANT'S PRINCIPAL EXECUTIVE OFFICES)
                                ---------------
                            CHRISTOPHER G. TOWNSEND
                                GENERAL COUNSEL
                           HOST MARRIOTT CORPORATION
                            HMC MERGER CORPORATION
                              10400 FERNWOOD ROAD
                           BETHESDA, MARYLAND 20817
                                (301) 380-9000
(NAME, ADDRESS, INCLUDING ZIP CODE, AND TELEPHONE NUMBER, INCLUDING AREA CODE,
                             OF AGENT FOR SERVICE)
                                ---------------
                                  COPIES TO:
                         J. WARREN GORRELL, JR., ESQ.
                             HOWARD I. FLACK, ESQ.
                            HOGAN & HARTSON L.L.P.
                          555 THIRTEENTH STREET, N.W.
                          WASHINGTON, D.C. 20004-1109
                                (202) 637-5600
                                ---------------
  APPROXIMATE DATE OF COMMENCEMENT OF PROPOSED SALE OF THE SECURITIES TO THE
PUBLIC: As soon as practicable after the effective date of this Registration
Statement.
  If the securities being registered on this form are being offered in
connection with the formation of a holding company and there is compliance
with General Instruction G, check the following box. [_]
  If this form is filed to register additional securities for an offering
pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and
list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective
registration statement for the same offering. [_]
  If this form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d)
under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act
registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement
for the same offering. [_]
                                ---------------
                        CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE
- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                               AMOUNT            PROPOSED      PROPOSED MAXIMUM      AMOUNT OF
  TITLE OF EACH CLASS OF        TO BE        MAXIMUM OFFERING AGGREGATE OFFERING    REGISTRATION
SECURITIES TO BE REGISTERED  REGISTERED      PRICE PER SHARE        PRICE               FEE
- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
<S>                          <C>             <C>              <C>                   <C>
 Shares of Common Stock,
  par value $.01 per
  share.................     204,586,035 (1)     $ 14.00       $ 2,864,204,490 (2)   $ 844,940 (2)
</TABLE>

- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
(1) Includes the maximum number of shares of common stock, par value $.01 per
    share ("Host REIT Common Stock"), of HMC Merger Corporation, a Maryland
    corporation (referred to herein as "Host REIT", which will be renamed
    "Host Marriott Corporation" following the merger described below), to be
    registered hereunder that may be issuable pursuant to the merger (the
    "Merger") of Host Marriott Corporation, a Delaware corporation ("Host"),
    with and into Host REIT pursuant to the Agreement and Plan of Merger by
    and among Host, Host REIT and Host Marriott L.P., as described in the
    Proxy Statement/Prospectus that forms a part of this Registration
    Statement. Based upon the number of shares of common stock, par value
    $1.00 per share, of Host ("Host Common Stock") outstanding at the close of
    business on September 28, 1998. Pursuant to the Merger, each outstanding
    share of Host Common Stock, together with the associated right under the
    Rights Agreement between Host and the Bank of New York, will be converted
    into the right to receive one share of Host REIT Common Stock, and,
    following the Merger, holders thereof will become subject to the Ownership
    Limit (as described in the Proxy Statement/Prospectus) under Host REIT's
    Articles of Incorporation. Outstanding options and other rights to acquire
    Host Common Stock will be converted into rights to acquire Host REIT
    Common Stock, subject to certain adjustments. See "The Restructuring
    Transactions--Terms of the Merger."
(2) Estimated solely for the purpose of calculating the registration fee
    pursuant to Rule 457(f) promulgated under the Securities Act of 1933, as
    amended.
  THE REGISTRANT HEREBY AMENDS THIS REGISTRATION STATEMENT ON SUCH DATE OR
DATES AS MAY BE NECESSARY TO DELAY ITS EFFECTIVE DATE UNTIL THE REGISTRANT
SHALL FILE A FURTHER AMENDMENT WHICH SPECIFICALLY STATES THAT THIS
REGISTRATION STATEMENT SHALL THEREAFTER BECOME EFFECTIVE IN ACCORDANCE WITH
SECTION 8(A) OF THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 OR UNTIL THE REGISTRATION STATEMENT
SHALL BECOME EFFECTIVE ON SUCH DATE AS THE COMMISSION, ACTING PURSUANT TO SAID
SECTION 8(A) MAY DETERMINE.
- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

<PAGE>
 
                           HOST MARRIOTT CORPORATION
                              10400 FERNWOOD ROAD
                         BETHESDA, MARYLAND 20817-1109
                                (301) 380-9000
 
                                                               NOVEMBER  , 1998
 
Dear Fellow Stockholder:
 
  You are cordially invited to attend a special meeting of stockholders of
Host Marriott Corporation, a Delaware corporation ("Host"), which will be held
at       on December  , 1998 at     , local time (the "Special Meeting").
 
  At the Special Meeting, you will be asked to approve (a) the Agreement and
Plan of Merger (the "Agreement"), entered into by and among Host, HMC Merger
Corporation, a wholly-owned, newly formed Maryland subsidiary of Host
(referred to herein as "Host REIT", which will be renamed "Host Marriott
Corporation" following the merger described below), and Host Marriott, L.P., a
recently formed Delaware limited partnership organized and currently wholly
owned by Host and of which Host will be the sole general partner (the
"Operating Partnership"); and (b) such other matters as may properly come
before the meeting or any adjournments or postponements thereof. The Agreement
contemplates certain restructuring transactions (the "Restructuring
Transactions") consisting of (i) the contribution by Host of its wholly-owned
full-service hotels, its interests in certain hotel partnerships and certain
other businesses and assets to the Operating Partnership (the "OP
Contribution") in exchange for units of limited partnership interest in the
Operating Partnership ("OP Units") and (ii) the reincorporation of Host from
the State of Delaware to the State of Maryland (the "Reincorporation") by
means of a merger (the "Merger") of Host with and into Host REIT, which was
formed for the sole purpose of effecting the Reincorporation. As a result of
the Reincorporation by means of the Merger, each outstanding share of common
stock of Host, together with the associated right issued under Host's existing
stockholder rights plan, will be converted into one share of common stock of
Host REIT.
 
  As described in the attached Proxy Statement/Prospectus, the Restructuring
Transactions are part of an overall plan (the "REIT Conversion") adopted by
Host to restructure its business operations so that it will qualify as a real
estate investment trust ("REIT") for federal income tax purposes. If Host REIT
qualifies as a REIT, it generally will not be subject to federal corporate
income taxes on that portion of its ordinary income or capital gain that is
distributed to its stockholders. Such treatment would substantially eliminate
the federal "double taxation" on earnings (at the corporate and stockholder
levels) that generally results from investment in a corporation. If the
Agreement is approved by the stockholders of Host at the Special Meeting and
the Restructuring Transactions are consummated, Host REIT expects to qualify
as a REIT beginning with its first full taxable year commencing after the REIT
Conversion is completed, which currently is expected to be the year commencing
January 1, 1999.
 
  The Host Board of Directors is proposing the Restructuring Transactions
primarily for the following reasons:
 
  . The Restructuring Transactions are essential components of Host's
    conversion to REIT status for federal income tax purposes. In particular,
    the OP Contribution will enable Host REIT, following the Merger, to
    operate, together with the Operating Partnership, in an umbrella
    partnership REIT ("UPREIT") structure, through which Host REIT would
    continue the full-service hotel ownership business currently conducted by
    Host. Host believes that the UPREIT structure will improve its ability to
    acquire additional properties in the future on favorable terms.
 
  . The provisions of Maryland law have generally been viewed as favorable to
    REITs organized in corporate or trust form, as evidenced by the large
    number of publicly traded REITs that have chosen to operate as a regular
    Maryland corporation or as a special statutory Maryland real estate
    investment trust.

<PAGE>
 
  . In particular, in order to satisfy certain requirements that are
    applicable to REITs in general, many REITs impose through their charters
    ownership limits and transfer restrictions similar to the ownership limit
    proposed by Host REIT in its charter, as described in the accompanying
    Proxy Statement/Prospectus. Under Delaware law, such restrictions would
    not be binding with respect to securities issued prior to adoption of the
    restriction unless holders of such securities agree to, or vote in favor
    of, such restriction. However, under Maryland law and by reason of the
    Merger, all shares of common stock of Host REIT issued in the Merger and
    thereafter would be subject to the ownership limit under Host REIT's
    charter, for which express statutory authority exists under Maryland law.
 
  . Host's principal executive offices and a substantial number of Host's
    employees are employed in Maryland.
 
  The Board of Directors of Host believes that the Restructuring Transactions
and the other transactions comprising the REIT Conversion described in the
accompanying Proxy Statement/Prospectus are advisable for Host and its
stockholders, based on the belief that: (i) the REIT structure, as a more
efficient tax structure, will provide improved operating results through
changing economic conditions and all phases of the hotel economic cycle; (ii)
the REIT Conversion, which will reduce corporate-level taxes and the need to
incur debt to reduce corporate taxes through interest deductions, will improve
its financial flexibility and allow it to continue to strengthen its balance
sheet by reducing its overall debt to equity ratio over time; (iii) as a REIT,
Host will be able to compete more effectively with other public lodging real
estate companies that already are organized as REITs and to make performance
comparisons with its peers more meaningful; (iv) by becoming a dividend paying
company, Host's stockholder base will expand to include investors attracted by
yield as well as asset quality; and (v) the adoption of an UPREIT structure
will facilitate tax-deferred acquisitions of additional hotels.
 
  The Merger will not be consummated unless Host's Board of Directors shall
have determined prior to consummating the Merger that the conditions to the
Merger (including approval of the Agreement by the stockholders of Host) have
been satisfied or waived, and in particular, that the transactions
constituting the REIT Conversion which impact Host REIT's status as a REIT for
federal income tax purposes have occurred or are reasonably likely to occur,
and based on advice of counsel, that Host REIT can elect to be treated as a
REIT for federal income tax purposes effective no later than the first full
taxable year commencing after the REIT Conversion is completed. In the event
the Agreement is not approved by Host stockholders at the Special Meeting,
Host will continue to operate as a Delaware corporation, and the REIT
Conversion will not be completed.
 
  Details of the Agreement, including the proposed Restructuring Transactions,
as well as the other transactions comprising the REIT Conversion, are
contained in the attached Proxy Statement/Prospectus, which you are encouraged
to read carefully.
 
  AFTER CAREFUL CONSIDERATION, YOUR BOARD OF DIRECTORS HAS DETERMINED THE
RESTRUCTURING TRANSACTIONS TO BE ADVISABLE FOR HOST AND ITS STOCKHOLDERS.
ACCORDINGLY, YOUR BOARD OF DIRECTORS HAS APPROVED THE AGREEMENT AND THE
TRANSACTIONS CONTEMPLATED THEREBY AND RECOMMENDS THAT ALL STOCKHOLDERS VOTE
"FOR" APPROVAL OF THE AGREEMENT AND THE TRANSACTIONS CONTEMPLATED THEREBY.
 
  The affirmative vote of holders of two-thirds (66 2/3%) of the outstanding
shares of Host Common Stock is necessary to approve the Agreement. Therefore,
whether or not you plan to attend the Special Meeting, please complete, sign
and date the enclosed proxy card and return it promptly in the enclosed
postage prepaid envelope. You may revoke your proxy in the manner discussed in
the accompanying Proxy Statement/Prospectus at any
 
                                       2

<PAGE>
 
time before it has been voted at the Special Meeting. If you attend the Special
Meeting, you may vote in person if you wish, even if you have previously
returned your proxy card. Your prompt cooperation will be greatly appreciated.
This solicitation is made on behalf of the Board of Directors of Host.
 
                                          Sincerely,
 
                                          RICHARD E. MARRIOTT
                                          Chairman of the Board
 
                             YOUR VOTE IS IMPORTANT
               PLEASE PROMPTLY COMPLETE, SIGN AND DATE AND RETURN
                            THE ENCLOSED PROXY CARD
 
 
 IF THE RESTRUCTURING TRANSACTIONS AND THE OTHER TRANSACTIONS COMPRISING
 THE REIT CONVERSION DO NOT OCCUR IN TIME FOR HOST REIT TO ELECT REIT
 STATUS EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 1999, THE EFFECTIVENESS OF HOST REIT'S
 ELECTION COULD BE DELAYED TO JANUARY 1, 2000, WHICH WOULD RESULT IN HOST
 OR HOST REIT CONTINUING TO PAY SUBSTANTIAL CORPORATE-LEVEL INCOME TAXES IN
 1999 AND COULD CAUSE OTHER RELATED TRANSACTIONS NOT TO BE CONSUMMATED.
 THEREFORE, IT IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT THAT STOCKHOLDERS RETURN THE PROXY
 CARDS AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. ANY DELAY IN RETURNING PROXIES COULD CAUSE THE
 SPECIAL MEETING TO BE DELAYED, WHICH COULD PREVENT THE RESTRUCTURING
 TRANSACTIONS AND THE OTHER TRANSACTIONS COMPRISING THE REIT CONVERSION
 FROM BEING EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 1999.
 
 
                                       3

<PAGE>
 
                           HOST MARRIOTT CORPORATION
                              10400 FERNWOOD ROAD
                         BETHESDA, MARYLAND 20817-1109
                                (301) 380-9000
 
                               ----------------
 
                   NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS
                        TO BE HELD ON DECEMBER  , 1998
 
                               ----------------
 
To the Stockholders of Host Marriott Corporation:
 
  NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a special meeting of stockholders of Host
Marriott Corporation, a Delaware corporation ("Host"), will be held at
on December  , 1998 at    , local time (the "Special Meeting"), for the
following purposes:
 
    1. To consider and vote upon a proposal to approve the Agreement and Plan
  of Merger dated      , 1998 (the "Agreement") by and among Host, HMC Merger
  Corporation, a wholly-owned, newly formed Maryland subsidiary of Host
  (referred to as "Host REIT", which will be renamed "Host Marriott
  Corporation" following the merger described below), and Host Marriott,
  L.P., a recently formed Delaware limited partnership organized and
  currently wholly owned by Host and of which Host will be the sole general
  partner (the "Operating Partnership"). The Agreement contemplates certain
  restructuring transactions (the "Restructuring Transactions") consisting of
  (i) the contribution by Host of its wholly-owned full-service hotels, its
  interests in certain hotel partnerships and certain other businesses and
  assets to the Operating Partnership (the "OP Contribution") in exchange for
  units of limited partnership interest in the Operating Partnership ("OP
  Units") and (ii) the reincorporation of Host from the State of Delaware to
  the State of Maryland (the "Reincorporation") by means of a merger (the
  "Merger") of Host with and into Host REIT, which was formed for the sole
  purpose of effecting the Reincorporation. If the Agreement is approved by
  Host stockholders and the Merger is consummated, Host REIT will be the
  surviving entity in the Merger, the separate existence of Host will
  terminate and each issued and outstanding share of common stock, par value
  $1.00 per share, of Host (the "Host Common Stock"), together with the
  associated right issued under the Rights Agreement dated as of February 3,
  1989 between Marriott Corporation (the former name of Host) and the Bank of
  New York, will be converted into one share of common stock, par value $.01
  per share, of Host REIT (the "Host REIT Common Stock"). In addition, the
  Agreement provides that, in the Merger, outstanding options and other
  rights to acquire Host Common Stock will be converted into rights to
  acquire Host REIT Common Stock, subject to certain adjustments. Following
  the Merger, holders of Host REIT Common Stock will become subject to the
  Ownership Limit (described below) under Host REIT's Articles of
  Incorporation (the "Host REIT Charter"). Primarily to satisfy certain
  requirements under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the
  "Code"), that are applicable to REITs in general, the Host REIT Charter
  will provide that no person or group of persons may own, or be deemed to
  own by virtue of the attribution provisions of the Code, more than 9.8% of
  the lesser of the number or value of shares of Host REIT Common Stock (or
  any class or series of Host REIT preferred stock) outstanding, subject to
  waiver or modification by Host REIT in certain limited circumstances and to
  certain limited exceptions for a holder of shares of Host REIT Common Stock
  solely by reason of the Merger so long as such holder would not own more
  than 9.8% by value of the outstanding capital stock of Host REIT after the
  Merger (the "Ownership Limit"). THE AGREEMENT, THE RESTRUCTURING
  TRANSACTIONS, INCLUDING THE TERMS OF THE MERGER, AND THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT
  ARE MORE COMPLETELY DESCRIBED IN THE ACCOMPANYING PROXY
  STATEMENT/PROSPECTUS AND THE APPENDICES THERETO, WHICH FORM A PART OF THIS
  NOTICE. A COPY OF THE AGREEMENT IS ATTACHED AS APPENDIX A TO THE PROXY
  STATEMENT/PROSPECTUS.
 
    2. To transact such other business as may properly come before the
  Special Meeting or any adjournments or postponements thereof.
 
  Host reserves the right to cancel or defer the Restructuring Transactions
even if stockholders of Host approve the Agreement and the other conditions to
the consummation of the Restructuring Transactions are satisfied.

<PAGE>
 
  Only stockholders of record of Host Common Stock at the close of business on
November  , 1998 (the "Record Date") are entitled to notice of, and to vote
at, the Special Meeting and at any adjournments or postponements thereof.
 
  Approval of the Agreement requires the affirmative vote of the holders of
two-thirds (66 2/3%) of the shares of Host Common Stock outstanding on the
Record Date for the Special Meeting.
 
  Pursuant to Delaware law, stockholders of Host will not be entitled to
appraisal rights as a result of the Merger or other Restructuring
Transactions.
 
  ALL STOCKHOLDERS ARE CORDIALLY INVITED TO ATTEND THE SPECIAL MEETING IN
PERSON. WHETHER OR NOT YOU PLAN TO ATTEND THE SPECIAL MEETING, PLEASE
COMPLETE, DATE AND SIGN THE ENCLOSED PROXY AND RETURN IT IN THE ENCLOSED
ENVELOPE AS PROMPTLY AS POSSIBLE. IF A PROXY IS SIGNED BUT NO VOTING
INSTRUCTIONS ARE INDICATED THEREON, SUCH PROXY WILL BE VOTED "FOR" APPROVAL OF
THE AGREEMENT AND THE TRANSACTIONS CONTEMPLATED THEREBY. IF YOU ATTEND THE
SPECIAL MEETING, YOU MAY WITHDRAW THE PROXY AND VOTE IN PERSON.
 
  HOST'S STOCKHOLDERS SHOULD NOT SEND ANY STOCK CERTIFICATES WITH THEIR PROXY
CARDS.
 
                                          By Order of the Board of Directors,
 
                                          CHRISTOPHER G. TOWNSEND
                                          Secretary
 
Bethesda, Maryland
November  , 1998
 
                                       2

<PAGE>
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN IS SUBJECT TO COMPLETION OR AMENDMENT. A         +
+REGISTRATION STATEMENT RELATING TO THESE SECURITIES HAS BEEN FILED WITH THE   +
+SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION. THESE SECURITIES MAY NOT BE SOLD NOR MAY  +
+OFFERS TO BUY BE ACCEPTED PRIOR TO THE TIME THE REGISTRATION STATEMENT        +
+BECOMES EFFECTIVE. THIS PROSPECTUS SHALL NOT CONSTITUTE AN OFFER TO SELL OR   +
+THE SOLICITATION OF AN OFFER TO BUY NOR SHALL THERE BE ANY SALE OF THESE      +
+SECURITIES IN ANY STATE IN WHICH SUCH OFFER, SOLICITATION OR SALE WOULD BE    +
+UNLAWFUL PRIOR TO REGISTRATION OR QUALIFICATION UNDER THE SECURITIES LAWS OF  +
+ANY SUCH STATE.                                                               +
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
                             SUBJECT TO COMPLETION
                            DATED SEPTEMBER 30, 1998
 
                                PROXY STATEMENT
 
                                       OF
 
                           HOST MARRIOTT CORPORATION
 
                                      AND
 
                                   PROSPECTUS
 
                                       OF
 
                             HMC MERGER CORPORATION
 
  This Proxy Statement/Prospectus is being furnished to the holders of the
common stock, par value $1.00 per share (the "Host Common Stock"), of Host
Marriott Corporation, a Delaware corporation ("Host"), in connection with the
solicitation of proxies by the Board of Directors of Host for use at a special
meeting of stockholders of Host to be held at       on December  , 1998 at
      , local time, and at any adjournments or postponements thereof (the
"Special Meeting"). At the Special Meeting, stockholders of Host will be asked
to approve (a) the Agreement and Plan of Merger dated      , 1998 (the
"Agreement"), by and among Host, HMC Merger Corporation, a wholly-owned, newly
formed Maryland subsidiary of Host (referred to herein as "Host REIT", which
will be renamed "Host Marriott Corporation" following the merger described
below), and Host Marriott, L.P., a recently formed Delaware limited partnership
organized and currently wholly-owned by Host and of which Host will be the sole
general partner (the "Operating Partnership"); and (b) such other matters as
may properly come before the meeting or any adjournments or postponements
thereof. The Agreement contemplates certain restructuring transactions (the
"Restructuring Transactions") consisting of (i) the contribution by Host of its
wholly-owned full-service hotels, its interests in certain hotel partnerships
and certain other businesses and assets to the Operating Partnership (the "OP
Contribution") in exchange for units of limited partnership interest in the
Operating Partnership ("OP Units") and (ii) the reincorporation of Host from
the State of Delaware to the State of Maryland (the "Reincorporation") by means
of a merger (the "Merger") of Host with and into Host REIT, which was formed
for the sole purpose of effecting the Reincorporation. A copy of the Agreement
is attached hereto as Appendix A.
 
  The Restructuring Transactions are part of an overall plan (the "REIT
Conversion") adopted by Host to restructure its business operations so that it
will qualify as a real estate investment trust ("REIT") for federal income tax
purposes. If the Agreement is approved by the stockholders of Host at the
Special Meeting and the Restructuring Transactions are consummated, Host REIT
expects to qualify as a REIT beginning with its first full taxable year
commencing after the REIT Conversion is completed, which currently is expected
to be the year commencing January 1, 1999. See "Federal Income Tax
Consequences."
 
  This Proxy Statement/Prospectus also constitutes the prospectus of Host REIT
relating to the common stock, par value $.01 per share, of Host REIT (the "Host
REIT Common Stock") into which the outstanding shares of Host Common Stock will
be converted as part of the Reincorporation by means of the Merger. If the
Agreement is approved by the Host stockholders and the Merger is consummated,
Host REIT will be the surviving entity in the Merger, the separate existence of
Host will terminate and each issued and outstanding share of Host Common Stock,
together with the associated right (the "Host Right") issued under the Rights
Agreement dated as of February 3, 1989 between Marriott Corporation (the former
name of Host) and the Bank of New York (the "Host Rights Agreement"), will be
converted into one share of Host REIT Common Stock. In addition, the Agreement
provides that, in the Merger, outstanding options and other rights to acquire
Host Common Stock will be converted into rights to acquire Host REIT Common
Stock, subject to certain adjustments to take into account aspects of the REIT
Conversion.
 
  ANY SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK HELD AS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT EFFECTIVE
TIME (AS DEFINED HEREIN) IN VIOLATION OF THE 9.8% OWNERSHIP LIMIT (AS DEFINED
HEREIN) WILL BE TRANSFERRED AUTOMATICALLY TO A TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT OF A
DESIGNATED CHARITABLE BENEFICIARY, AND THE PERSON WHO HOLDS SUCH EXCESS SHARES
OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY DISTRIBUTIONS THEREON OR
TO VOTE SUCH EXCESS SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK. TO AVOID THE ADVERSE
EFFECTS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT, ANY HOLDER OF HOST COMMON STOCK WHO WOULD OWN
SHARES IN EXCESS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT AS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT EFFECTIVE
TIME SHOULD DISPOSE OF ANY SUCH EXCESS SHARES PRIOR THERETO.
 
  SEE "RISK FACTORS" BEGINNING ON PAGE 29 FOR MATERIAL RISKS THAT SHOULD BE
CONSIDERED WHEN VOTING ON THE AGREEMENT, INCLUDING THE FOLLOWING:
  . Since Host REIT will lease virtually all of its hotels to lessees, Host
    REIT will be dependent for its revenue upon the ability of the lessees of
    Host REIT's hotels, Marriott International, Inc. ("Marriott
    International"), which currently manages all but 16 of Host's hotels, and
    other companies that manage the hotels and upon various non-controlled
    subsidiaries of Host REIT, and Host REIT will have limited control over
    the operation of the hotels and no control over the non-controlled
    subsidiaries.
  . Rental payments from the lessees of Host REIT's hotels will be the primary
    source of Host REIT's revenues.

<PAGE>
 
  . After the REIT Conversion, Host REIT, as the sole general partner of the
    Operating Partnership, will have fiduciary obligations to the limited
    partners in the Operating Partnership, and the discharge of such
    obligations may result in decisions that do not fully reflect the
    interests of Host REIT's stockholders. Conflicts of interest also may be
    involved in Host REIT's relationships with Marriott International and the
    lessees.
  . If the REIT Conversion does not occur in time for Host REIT to elect REIT
    status effective January 1, 1999, the effectiveness of Host REIT's
    election could be delayed until January 1, 2000, which would result in
    Host or Host REIT continuing to pay substantial corporate-level income
    taxes in 1999 and could cause the Blackstone Acquisition (as defined
    herein) not to be consummated.
  . The current stock price of Host reflects the current market valuation of
    Host's current business and assets and not the business and assets of
    Host REIT following the REIT Conversion.
  . The preliminary estimated initial annual cash distributions of the
    Operating Partnership during the twelve months ending December 31, 1999
    ($226 million) will exceed its estimated pro forma cash available for
    distribution during the twelve months ending December 31, 1999 ($214
    million), which would require borrowings of approximately $13 million
    (including interest thereon of $1 million) to make such distributions.
  . There are several uncertainties relating to the REIT Conversion that will
    exist at the time Host stockholders vote on the Agreement. There is no
    assurance as to the outcome of various matters, and if certain of these
    events or transactions are not consummated as expected, it is possible
    that the value of the Host REIT Common Stock and the cash available for
    distribution to stockholders of Host REIT could be materially adversely
    affected or Host REIT could fail to qualify as a REIT for federal income
    tax purposes.
  . The inability of Host, the Operating Partnership and Host REIT to obtain
    material third-party consents prior to consummation of the REIT
    Conversion could have a material adverse effect on the Operating
    Partnership and Host REIT, and thus could reduce the value of the Host
    REIT Common Stock.
  . The Ownership Limit under the Host REIT Charter will adversely affect
    the value of any Host REIT Common Stock held in excess of such Ownership
    Limit and may have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a
    change in control of Host REIT.
  . The Host REIT Charter and Bylaws, the Maryland General Corporation Law, as
    amended (the "MGCL"), certain existing rights of Marriott International
    and Host REIT's stockholder rights plan contain or will contain a number
    of provisions that may limit the ability of outside parties to acquire, or
    discourage them from acquiring, control of Host REIT.
  . Taxation of Host REIT as a regular corporation if it fails to qualify as
    a REIT, or taxation of the Operating Partnership as a corporation if it
    fails to qualify as a partnership for federal income tax purposes, would,
    among other things, result in a material decrease in cash available for
    distribution and a material reduction in the value of the Host REIT
    Common Stock.
  . No assurance can be provided that new legislation, Treasury Regulations,
    administrative interpretations or court decisions will not significantly
    change the tax laws with respect to Host REIT's qualification as a REIT
    or the federal income tax consequences of such qualification.
 
  The Board of Directors has fixed the close of business on November  , 1998
as the record date for the determination of stockholders entitled to receive
notice of and vote at the Special Meeting (the "Record Date"). As of the
Record Date, there were    outstanding shares of Host Common Stock and
holders of record. See "Voting and Proxies."
 
  This Proxy Statement/Prospectus and the accompanying proxy card are first
being mailed to stockholders of Host on or about November  , 1998.
 
  This Proxy Statement/Prospectus does not cover any resales of Host REIT
Common Stock to be received by stockholders of Host upon consummation of the
Merger, and no person is authorized to make use of this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus in connection with any such resale.
 
                               ----------------
 
THE SECURITIES DESCRIBED HEREIN HAVE NOT BEEN APPROVED OR DISAPPROVED BY THE
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION OR ANY STATE SECURITIES COMMISSION NOR HAS
THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION OR ANY STATE SECURITIES COMMISSION
PASSED UPON THE ACCURACY OR ADEQUACY OF THIS PROXY STATEMENT/PROSPECTUS. ANY
REPRESENTATION TO THE CONTRARY IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE.
 
                               ----------------
 
       THE DATE OF THIS PROXY STATEMENT/PROSPECTUS IS DECEMBER  , 1998.
 
                                      ii

<PAGE>
 
                INCORPORATION OF CERTAIN DOCUMENTS BY REFERENCE
 
  THIS PROXY STATEMENT/PROSPECTUS INCORPORATES DOCUMENTS BY REFERENCE THAT ARE
NOT PRESENTED HEREIN OR DELIVERED HEREWITH. HOST WILL PROVIDE WITHOUT CHARGE
TO EACH PERSON TO WHOM THIS PROXY STATEMENT/PROSPECTUS IS DELIVERED A COPY OF
ANY OR ALL OF SUCH DOCUMENTS THAT ARE INCORPORATED HEREIN BY REFERENCE (OTHER
THAN EXHIBITS TO SUCH DOCUMENTS UNLESS SUCH EXHIBITS ARE SPECIFICALLY
INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE INTO THE DOCUMENTS THAT THIS PROXY
STATEMENT/PROSPECTUS INCORPORATES). ORAL OR WRITTEN REQUESTS FOR SUCH
DOCUMENTS SHOULD BE DIRECTED TO HOST MARRIOTT CORPORATION, 10400 FERNWOOD
ROAD, BETHESDA, MARYLAND 20817-1109, (301) 380-9000, ATTENTION: CHRISTOPHER G.
TOWNSEND, SECRETARY. IN ORDER TO ENSURE TIMELY DELIVERY OF THE DOCUMENTS, ANY
REQUEST SHOULD BE MADE BY DECEMBER  , 1998.
 
  The following documents heretofore filed by Host with the Securities and
Exchange Commission (the "Commission") pursuant to the Exchange Act are hereby
incorporated by reference in this Proxy Statement/Prospectus and shall be
deemed to be a part hereof:
 
    (1) Host's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended January 2, 1998
  (the "1997 Form 10-K");
 
    (2) Host's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 27,
  1998; and Host's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June
  19, 1998; and
 
    (3) Host's Current Report on Form 8-K dated April 17, 1998, filed with
  the Commission on April 17, 1998; Host's Current Report on Form 8-K dated
  July 15, 1998, filed with the Commission on July 17, 1998; Host's Current
  Report on Form 8-K dated July 17, 1998, filed with the Commission on July
  28, 1998; Host's Current Report on Form 8-K dated July 29, 1998, filed with
  the Commission on July 30, 1998; Host's Current Report on Form 8-K dated
  July 29, 1998, filed with the Commission on July 31, 1998; Host's Current
  Report on Form 8-K dated July 29, 1998, filed with the Commission on August
  6, 1998; and Host's Current Report on Form 8-K dated August 5, 1998, filed
  with the Commission on September 11, 1998.
 
  All documents filed with the Commission by Host pursuant to Section 13(a),
13(c), 14 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act subsequent to the date hereof and prior
to the date of the Special Meeting shall be deemed to be incorporated by
reference in this Proxy Statement/Prospectus and to be a part hereof from the
date any such document is filed. Any statement contained herein or in any
document incorporated or deemed to be incorporated herein by reference shall
be deemed to be modified or superseded for all purposes of this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus to the extent a statement contained in this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus or in any subsequently filed document that also is deemed
to be incorporated herein by reference modifies or supersedes such statement.
Any statement so modified or superseded shall not be deemed, except as so
modified or superseded, to constitute a part of this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus. All information appearing in this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus is qualified in its entirety by the information and
financial statements (including notes thereto) appearing in the documents
incorporated herein by reference, except to the extent set forth in the
immediately preceding statement.
 
  No persons have been authorized to give any information or to make any
representation with respect to the matters described in this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus other than those contained herein or in the documents
incorporated by reference herein and, if given or made, such information or
representation must not be relied upon as having been authorized by Host or
Host REIT. This Proxy Statement/Prospectus does not constitute an offer to
sell, or a solicitation of an offer to buy, any securities in any jurisdiction
to or from any person to whom it is not lawful to make any such offer or
solicitation in such jurisdiction. Neither the delivery of this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus nor any distribution of securities made hereunder shall
under any circumstances create an implication that there has been no change in
the facts set forth in this Proxy Statement/Prospectus or the affairs of Host
or Host REIT since the date hereof or that the information herein is correct
as of any time subsequent to the date hereof.
 
                                      iii

<PAGE>
 
                               TABLE OF CONTENTS
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                           PAGE
                                                                           ----
<S>                                                                        <C>
INCORPORATION OF CERTAIN DOCUMENTS BY REFERENCE...........................  iv
SUMMARY...................................................................   1
  Forward-Looking Statements..............................................   1
  Certain Key Definitions.................................................   2
  Overview................................................................   4
  Risk Factors............................................................   9
  Date, Time, Place and Purpose of Special Meeting........................  13
  Stockholders Entitled to Vote...........................................  13
  Vote Required; No Dissenters' Rights....................................  14
  The Restructuring Transactions..........................................  14
  The REIT Conversion.....................................................  19
  Federal Income Tax Consequences.........................................  24
  Recommendation of the Board of Directors................................  25
  Distributions and Market Prices of Host Common Stock....................  25
  Distribution and Dividend Policy After the Merger.......................  26
  Unaudited Per Share Data................................................  27
  Summary Financial Information...........................................  27
RISK FACTORS..............................................................  29
  Risks and Effects of the Merger and the REIT Conversion.................  29
    Lack of Control over Hotel Operations.................................  29
    Lack of Control over Non-Controlled Subsidiaries......................  29
    Dependence upon Crestline.............................................  29
    Conflicts of Interest.................................................  30
    Current Host Common Stock Price Is Not Necessarily Indicative of the
     Price of Host REIT Common Stock Following the REIT Conversion........  30
    Cash Distributions May Exceed Cash Available for Distribution.........  30
    Timing of the Restructuring Transactions and the REIT Conversion......  31
    Uncertainties at the Time of Voting on the Agreement..................  31
    Inability to Obtain Third-Party Consents..............................  31
    Expiration of the Leases and Possible Inability to Find Other
     Lessees..............................................................  31
    Leases Could Impair the Sale or Other Disposition of Host REIT's Ho-
     tels.................................................................  32
    Limitations on Sale or Refinancing of Certain Hotels..................  32
  Risks of Ownership of Host REIT Common Stock............................  32
    Possible Adverse Consequences of Limits on Ownership of Host REIT Com-
     mon Stock............................................................  32
    Limitations on Acquisition of Host REIT Common Stock and Change in
     Control..............................................................  33
    Effect on Stock Price of Shares Available for Future Sale.............  36
    Effect on Stock Price of Market Conditions............................  36
    Effect on Stock Price of Earnings and Cash Distributions..............  37
    Effect on Stock Price of Market Interest Rates........................  37
    Effect on Stock Price of Unrelated Events.............................  37
    Dependence on External Sources of Capital.............................  37
  Federal Income Tax Risks Relating to REIT Qualification.................  37
    General...............................................................  37
    Required Distributions and Payments...................................  38
    Consequences of Failure to Qualify as a REIT..........................  38
    "Earnings and Profits" Attributable to "C" Corporation Taxable Years..  38
    Treatment of Leases...................................................  39
    Other Tax Liabilities; Host REIT's Substantial Deferred and Contingent
     Tax Liabilities......................................................  39
    Failure of the Operating Partnership to Qualify as a Partnership......  39
</TABLE>

 
                                       iv

<PAGE>
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                           PAGE
                                                                           ----
<S>                                                                        <C>
  Other Tax Risks.........................................................  40
    Tax Consequences of the OP Contribution...............................  40
    Effects of Subsequent Events upon Recognition of Gain.................  40
  Risks of Operation......................................................  40
    Competition in the Lodging Industry...................................  40
    Substantial Indebtedness of Host REIT.................................  40
    No Limitation on Debt.................................................  41
    The Board May Change Investment Policies Without Stockholder Approv-
     al...................................................................  41
    Management Agreements Could Impair the Sale or Other Disposition of
     Host REIT's Hotels...................................................  41
    Rental Revenues from Hotels Subject to Prior Rights of Lenders........  41
    Hotels Subject to Ground Leases May Affect Host REIT's Revenues.......  42
    General Real Estate Investment Risks..................................  42
    Possible Underperformance of New Acquisitions.........................  42
    Seasonality...........................................................  42
    Illiquidity of Real Estate............................................  42
  Miscellaneous Risks.....................................................  43
    Changes in Laws.......................................................  43
    Dependence upon Key Personnel.........................................  43
    Potential Litigation Related to the REIT Conversion...................  43
    Risk Involved in Investments through Partnerships or Joint Ventures...  43
    Uninsured Loss........................................................  44
    Americans with Disabilities Act.......................................  44
    Other Regulatory Issues...............................................  44
    Possible Environmental Liabilities....................................  44
CONFLICTS OF INTEREST.....................................................  45
  Responsibilities of Host REIT to Other Limited Partners in the Operating
   Partnership............................................................  45
  Potential Conflicts Involving Marriott International and Crestline......  45
  Policies with Respect to Conflicts of Interest..........................  45
VOTING AND PROXIES........................................................  46
  Matters to be Considered at the Special Meeting.........................  46
  Record Date and Outstanding Shares......................................  46
  Voting of Proxies.......................................................  46
  Vote Required...........................................................  46
  Quorum; Abstentions and Treatment of Broker Non-Votes; Adjournment; Rev-
   ocation................................................................  47
  Solicitation of Proxies and Expenses....................................  47
THE RESTRUCTURING TRANSACTIONS............................................  49
  Background and Reasons for the Restructuring Transactions and the REIT
   Conversion.............................................................  49
  The OP Contribution.....................................................  51
  Terms of the Merger.....................................................  51
  Absence of Dissenters' Rights...........................................  53
  Accounting Treatment....................................................  53
  Conditions to the Restructuring Transactions............................  53
  Comparison of Rights of Stockholders of Host and Host REIT..............  54
  Limitation of Liability and Indemnification of Directors and Officers...  67
THE REIT CONVERSION.......................................................  69
  The Initial E&P Distribution............................................  69
  Other Transactions Comprising the REIT Conversion.......................  70
</TABLE>

 
 
                                       v

<PAGE>
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                            PAGE
                                                                            ----
<S>                                                                         <C>
BUSINESS AND PROPERTIES...................................................   75
  Business of the Company.................................................   75
  General.................................................................   76
  Business Objectives.....................................................   76
  Business Strategy.......................................................   76
  Hotel Lodging Industry..................................................   79
  Hotel Lodging Properties................................................   80
  Hotel Properties........................................................   85
  1998 Acquisitions.......................................................   87
  Blackstone Acquisition..................................................   87
  Investments in Affiliated Partnerships..................................   88
  Marketing...............................................................   88
  Competition.............................................................   89
  Relationship with HM Services...........................................   89
  Relationship with Marriott International; Marriott International Distri-
   bution.................................................................   89
  Employees...............................................................   90
  Environmental and Regulatory Matters....................................   90
  Legal Proceedings.......................................................   90
  The Leases..............................................................   92
  The Management Agreements...............................................   97
  Noncompetition Agreements...............................................  100
  Indebtedness............................................................  101
DISTRIBUTION AND OTHER POLICIES...........................................  103
  Distribution Policy.....................................................  103
  Investment Policies.....................................................  105
  Financing Policies......................................................  106
  Lending Policies........................................................  107
  Conflicts of Interest Policies..........................................  107
  Policies with Respect to Other Activities...............................  108
SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA...................................................  109
MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF
 OPERATIONS...............................................................  111
  Lack of Comparability Following the Merger and the REIT Conversion......  111
  Historical Results of Operations........................................  111
  First Two Quarters 1998 Compared to First Two Quarters 1997 (Histori-
   cal)...................................................................  111
  1997 Compared to 1996 (Historical)......................................  113
  1996 Compared to 1995 (Historical)......................................  115
  Pro Forma Results of Operations.........................................  116
  100% Participation with No Notes Issued--First Two Quarters 1998
   Compared to First Two Quarters 1997 (Pro Forma)........................  117
  100% Participation with Notes Issued--First Two Quarters 1998 Compared
   to First Two Quarters 1997 (Pro Forma).................................  118
  100% Participation with No Notes Issued--1997 Compared to 1996 (Pro
   Forma).................................................................  119
  100% Participation with Notes Issued--1997 Compared to 1996 (Pro
   Forma).................................................................  120
  Liquidity and Capital Resources.........................................  121
MANAGEMENT................................................................  130
  Directors, Executive Officers and Key Employees of Host REIT............  130
  Committees of the Board of Directors....................................  132
  Compensation of Directors...............................................  133
</TABLE>

 
                                       vi

<PAGE>
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                           PAGE
                                                                           ----
<S>                                                                        <C>
  Executive Compensation.................................................. 133
  Aggregate Stock Option Exercises and Year-End Value..................... 135
  Long-Term Incentive Plan................................................ 135
  Employment Agreements................................................... 136
  1998 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement............................. 136
  Comprehensive Stock Plan................................................ 137
  Stock Purchase Plan..................................................... 138
  401(k) Plan............................................................. 138
  Deferred Compensation Plan.............................................. 138
  Limitation of Liability and Indemnification............................. 138
  Indemnification Agreements.............................................. 138
CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS............................ 139
  Relationship Between Host and Marriott International.................... 139
  Relationship Between Host and Host Marriott Services Corporation........ 142
  Relationship Between Host and Crestline Capital Corporation After the
   Initial E&P Distribution............................................... 143
PRINCIPAL STOCKHOLDERS.................................................... 146
DESCRIPTION OF HOST REIT CAPITAL STOCK.................................... 148
  General................................................................. 148
  Host REIT Common Stock.................................................. 148
  Preferred Stock......................................................... 149
  Power to Issue Additional Host REIT Common Stock and Preferred Stock.... 149
  Restrictions on Ownership and Transfer.................................. 149
  Transfer Agent and Registrar............................................ 152
CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF MARYLAND LAW AND THE HOST REIT CHARTER AND BYLAWS... 153
  Number of Directors; Classification and Removal of Board of Directors;
   Other Provisions....................................................... 153
  Changes in Control Pursuant to Maryland Law............................. 154
  Advance Notice of Director Nominations and New Business................. 155
  Meetings of Stockholders; Call of Special Meetings; Stockholder Action
   in Lieu of Meeting by Unanimous Consent................................ 155
  Merger, Consolidation, Share Exchange and Transfer of Assets of Host
   REIT................................................................... 155
  Determination of Advisability of Mergers, Consolidations, Share Ex-
   changes, Transfers of Assets and Other Business Combinations Involving
   Host REIT.............................................................. 156
  Amendments to the Host REIT Charter and Bylaws.......................... 156
  Anti-Takeover Effect of Certain Provisions of Maryland Law and the Host
   REIT Charter and Bylaws................................................ 156
  Marriott International Purchase Right................................... 156
  Stockholder Rights Plan................................................. 157
DESCRIPTION OF THE PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT AND OP UNITS..................... 159
  General................................................................. 159
  Formation............................................................... 159
  Purposes, Business and Management....................................... 159
  Host REIT May Not Engage in Other Businesses; Conflicts of Interest..... 160
  Distributions; Allocations of Income and Loss........................... 160
  Borrowing by the Operating Partnership.................................. 160
  Reimbursement of Host REIT; Transactions with Host REIT and its Affili-
   ates................................................................... 160
  Liability of Host REIT and Limited Partners............................. 161
  Exculpation and Indemnification of Host REIT............................ 161
  Sales of Assets......................................................... 162
  Removal or Withdrawal of Host REIT; Transfer of Host REIT's Interests... 162
</TABLE>

 
                                      vii

<PAGE>
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                            PAGE
                                                                            ----
<S>                                                                         <C>
  Certain Voting Rights of Holders of OP Units During the First Year
   Following the Effective Date of the Partnership Mergers................. 163
  Restrictions on Transfers of Interests by Limited Partners............... 163
  Unit Redemption Right.................................................... 164
  No Withdrawal by Limited Partners........................................ 164
  Issuance of Limited Partnership Interests................................ 164
  Meetings; Voting......................................................... 165
  Amendment of the Partnership Agreement................................... 165
  Books and Reports........................................................ 166
  Power of Attorney........................................................ 166
  Dissolution, Winding Up and Termination.................................. 166
  Ownership Limitation..................................................... 167
ERISA CONSIDERATIONS....................................................... 168
  Status of Host REIT and the Operating Partnership Under ERISA............ 168
FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSEQUENCES............................................ 169
  Introduction............................................................. 169
  Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Merger............................ 170
  Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Initial E&P Distribution.......... 171
  Federal Income Tax Consequences of the OP Contribution................... 174
  Federal Income Taxation of Host REIT Following the Merger................ 175
  Taxation of Taxable U.S. Stockholders Generally.......................... 187
  Backup Withholding for Host REIT Distributions........................... 189
  Taxation of Tax-Exempt Stockholders of Host REIT......................... 189
  Taxation of Non-U.S. Stockholders........................................ 190
  Tax Aspects of Host REIT's Ownership of OP Units......................... 192
  Other Tax Consequences for Host REIT and Its Stockholders................ 196
LEGAL MATTERS.............................................................. 196
EXPERTS.................................................................... 196
OTHER MATTERS.............................................................. 196
STOCKHOLDER PROPOSALS...................................................... 197
AVAILABLE INFORMATION...................................................... 197
GLOSSARY................................................................... 199
INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS.............................................. F-1
</TABLE>

 
APPENDICES
 
  Appendix A--Agreement and Plan of Merger
 
                                      viii

<PAGE>
 
                                    SUMMARY
 
  This Summary does not purport to be complete and is qualified in its entirety
by the more detailed information appearing elsewhere in this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus, including the appendices attached hereto (this "Proxy
Statement/Prospectus"), and is presented solely to provide an overview of the
transactions described in detail in the remainder of this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus and of the business and investment considerations and
risks that should be considered carefully when voting on the Agreement.
Stockholders are advised not to rely on this Summary, but to carefully review
this entire Proxy Statement/Prospectus.
 
  The information contained herein, unless otherwise indicated, assumes the
Restructuring Transactions and the other transactions comprising the REIT
Conversion (including the Blackstone Acquisition, as defined below) occur, all
Partnerships (as defined below) participate in the Partnership Mergers (as
defined below) and no shares of Host REIT Common Stock or Notes (as defined
below) are issued in the Partnership Mergers (the "Full Participation
Scenario").
 
FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
 
  Certain matters discussed herein or delivered in connection with this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus are forward-looking statements. Certain, but not
necessarily all, of such forward-looking statements can be identified by the
use of forward-looking terminology, such as "believes," "expects," "may,"
"will," "should," "estimates" or "anticipates" or the negative thereof or other
variations thereof or comparable terminology. All forward-looking statements
involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may
cause the actual transactions, results, performance or achievements of Host
REIT to be materially different from any future transactions, results,
performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking
statements. The cautionary statements set forth under the caption "Risk
Factors" and elsewhere in this Proxy Statement/Prospectus identify important
factors with respect to such forward-looking statements, including the
following factors that could affect such forward-looking statements: (i)
national and local economic and business conditions that will, among other
things, affect demand for hotels and other properties, the level of rates and
occupancy that can be achieved by such properties and the availability and
terms of financing; (ii) the ability to maintain the properties in a first-
class manner (including meeting capital expenditure requirements); (iii) Host
REIT's ability to compete effectively in areas such as access, location,
quality of accommodations and room rate structures; (iv) Host REIT's ability to
acquire or develop additional properties and the risk that potential
acquisitions or developments may not perform in accordance with expectations;
(v) Host REIT's ability to obtain required consents of stockholders, lenders,
debt holders, partners and ground lessors of Host and its affiliates and of
other third parties in connection with the REIT Conversion and to consummate
all of the transactions constituting part of the REIT Conversion (including the
Blackstone Acquisition); (vi) changes in travel patterns, taxes and government
regulations which influence or determine wages, prices, construction procedures
and costs; (vii) governmental approvals, actions and initiatives, including the
need for compliance with environmental and safety requirements, and changes in
laws and regulations or the interpretation thereof; (viii) the effects of tax
legislative action; and (ix) the timing of Host REIT's election to be taxed as
a REIT and the ability of Host REIT to satisfy complex rules in order to
qualify for taxation as a REIT for federal income tax purposes and to operate
effectively within the limitations imposed by these rules. Although Host REIT
believes the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are
based upon reasonable assumptions, it can give no assurance that its
expectations will be attained or that any deviations will not be material. Host
REIT undertakes no obligation to publicly release the result of any revisions
to these forward-looking statements that may be made to reflect any future
events or circumstances.
 
                                       1

<PAGE>
 
CERTAIN KEY DEFINITIONS
 
  The following terms have the meanings set forth below. See the "Glossary" on
page 199 for the definitions of other capitalized terms used in this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus.
 
"Host"........................  Host Marriott Corporation, a Delaware
                                corporation, and either the general partner or
                                an affiliate of the general partner of each
                                Partnership (as defined below), or, as the
                                context may require, Host Marriott Corporation
                                together with its subsidiaries or any of such
                                subsidiaries.
 
"Host REIT"...................  HMC Merger Corporation, a wholly-owned, newly
                                formed Maryland subsidiary of Host (to be
                                renamed "Host Marriott Corporation" in
                                connection with the Merger), which was formed
                                for the sole purpose of effecting the
                                Reincorporation by means of the Merger, and
                                which will be the sole general partner of the
                                Operating Partnership, and the successor to
                                Host, or, as the context may require, HMC
                                Merger Corporation and the Operating
                                Partnership collectively together with their
                                subsidiaries or any of such subsidiaries.
 
"Operating Partnership".......  Host Marriott L.P., a Delaware limited
                                partnership, the sole general partner of which
                                will be Host REIT, or as the context may
                                require, such entity together with its
                                subsidiaries, including the Non-Controlled
                                Subsidiaries (as defined below), or any of
                                them.
 
"Company".....................  Host (to the extent of its business and assets
                                to be contributed to the Operating Partnership)
                                with respect to the period prior to the REIT
                                Conversion, and Host REIT and the Operating
                                Partnership collectively with respect to the
                                period after the REIT Conversion.
 
"Non-Controlled                 The one or more taxable corporations in which
Subsidiaries".................  the Operating Partnership will own 95% of the
                                economic interest but no voting stock and which
                                will hold various assets contributed by Host
                                and its subsidiaries to the Operating
                                Partnership, which assets, if owned directly by
                                the Operating Partnership, could jeopardize
                                Host REIT's status as a REIT.
 
"Crestline"...................  Crestline Capital Corporation (formerly HMC
                                Senior Communities, Inc.), a Delaware
                                corporation, or, as the context may require,
                                such entity together with the Lessees (as
                                defined below) and its other subsidiaries or
                                any of them, which currently is a wholly-owned
                                subsidiary of Host but will become a separate
                                public company as part of the REIT Conversion
                                when Host or Host REIT distributes the common
                                stock of Crestline to its existing
                                stockholders, as part of the Initial E&P
                                Distribution.
 
"REIT Conversion".............  (i) The OP Contribution, (ii) the
                                Reincorporation by means of the Merger, (iii)
                                the Initial E&P Distribution, (iv) the recently
                                completed refinancing and amendment of the debt
                                securities and certain credit facilities of
                                Host substantially in the manner described
                                herein, (v) the Partnership Mergers (if and to
                                the extent
 
                                       2

<PAGE>
 
                                consummated), (vi) the Private Partnership
                                Transactions (if and to the extent
                                consummated), (vii) the Blackstone Acquisition
                                (if and to the extent consummated), (viii) the
                                creation and capitalization of the Non-
                                Controlled Subsidiaries, (ix) the leasing of
                                all of the full-service hotels owned or
                                controlled by Host REIT for initial terms
                                ranging from seven to ten years (the "Leases")
                                to lessees, which will be indirect wholly-owned
                                subsidiaries of Crestline (the "Lessees"),
                                whereby the Lessees will operate the hotels
                                under their existing brand names and pursuant
                                to their existing management agreements, and
                                (x) such other related transactions described
                                in "The REIT Conversion" and such other steps
                                occurring prior to, substantially concurrent
                                with or within a reasonable time after the
                                Effective Date, as Host may determine in its
                                discretion to be necessary or desirable to
                                complete or facilitate the transactions
                                contemplated herein or otherwise to permit Host
                                REIT to elect to be treated as a REIT for
                                federal income tax purposes.
 
"OP Contribution".............  The contribution by Host of its wholly-owned
                                full-service Hotels (as defined below), its
                                interests in hotel partnerships and certain
                                other businesses and assets to the Operating
                                Partnership in exchange for OP Units.
 
"Reincorporation".............  The reincorporation of Host from the State of
                                Delaware to the State of Maryland by means of
                                the Merger.
 
"Merger"......................  The proposed merger of Host with and into Host
                                REIT, as described in this Proxy
                                Statement/Prospectus.
 
"Effective Date"..............  The date upon which the Reincorporation by
                                means of the Merger is consummated.

"Restructuring                
Transactions".................  The OP Contribution and the Reincorporation by
                                means of the Merger.
 
"Initial E&P Distribution"....  One or more taxable distributions by Host or
                                Host REIT to their stockholders in connection
                                with the REIT Conversion consisting of shares
                                of common stock of Crestline and cash or other
                                consideration in an amount to be determined.
 
"OP Units"....................  The limited partnership interests in the
                                Operating Partnership.
 
"Partnership Mergers".........  The acquisition by merger, if and to the extent
                                consummated, of up to eight limited
                                partnerships (the "Partnerships") that own
                                full-service hotels in which Host or its
                                subsidiaries are general partners in exchange
                                for OP Units (which may be exchanged for Host
                                REIT Common Stock or unsecured notes of the
                                Operating Partnership (the "Notes")).

"Private Partnership          
Transactions".................  The acquisition of the partnership interests
                                from unaffiliated partners of certain
                                partnerships or limited liability companies
                                (the "Private Partnerships") that own one or
                                more full-service hotels
 
                                       3

<PAGE>
 
                                and that, prior to the REIT conversion, are
                                partially but not wholly-owned by Host or one
                                of its subsidiaries in exchange for OP Units,
                                if and to the extent such acquisitions are
                                consummated.
 
"Blackstone Acquisition"......  The expected acquisition from The Blackstone
                                Group and a series of funds controlled by
                                Blackstone Real Estate Partners (collectively,
                                the "Blackstone Entities") of ownership of, or
                                controlling interests in, twelve hotels and a
                                mortgage loan secured by a thirteenth hotel in
                                exchange for OP Units, the assumption of
                                certain liabilities and other consideration,
                                including up to 18% of the shares of Crestline
                                common stock, to the extent such acquisition is
                                consummated.
 
"Ownership Limit".............  The prohibition in Host REIT's charter against
                                ownership, directly or indirectly by virtue of
                                the attribution provisions of the Internal
                                Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"),
                                by any person or persons acting as a group of
                                more than (i) 9.8% of the lesser of the number
                                or value of shares of Host REIT Common Stock
                                outstanding or (ii) 9.8% of the lesser of the
                                number or value of the issued and outstanding
                                shares of any class or series of Host REIT
                                preferred stock, subject to waiver or
                                modification by Host REIT in certain limited
                                circumstances and to certain limited exceptions
                                for a holder of shares of Host REIT Common
                                Stock solely by reason of the Merger so long as
                                such holder would not own, directly or by
                                attribution under the Code, more than 9.8% by
                                value of the outstanding capital stock of Host
                                REIT after the Merger.
 
OVERVIEW
 
  General. Host has adopted a plan to restructure its business operations so
that it will qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes. Host REIT was
organized as a Maryland subsidiary of Host on September 28, 1998 for the sole
purpose of effecting the Reincorporation by means of the Merger. Upon
consummation of the Restructuring Transactions, Host REIT will succeed to and
continue the business of Host. The Restructuring Transactions are part of a
series of transactions comprising the REIT Conversion. If Host REIT qualifies
as a REIT, it generally will not be subject to federal corporate income taxes
on that portion of its ordinary income or capital gain that is distributed to
its stockholders. Such treatment would substantially eliminate the federal
"double taxation" on earnings (at the corporate and stockholder levels) that
generally results from investment in a corporation. See "Federal Income Tax
Consequences." Host REIT has conducted no business to date other than that
incident to the REIT Conversion. This Proxy Statement/Prospectus is being
furnished to the holders of Host Common Stock to solicit their approval of the
Agreement, which contemplates the OP Contribution and the Reincorporation by
means of the Merger.
 
  The principal executive offices of both Host and Host REIT are located at
10400 Fernwood Road, Bethesda, Maryland, 20817-1109, telephone number (301)
380-9000.
 
  The OP Contribution. As a preliminary step in the REIT Conversion, during
1998, various subsidiaries of Host will be contributing and, subject to
approval of the Agreement at the Special Meeting, after the Special Meeting
Host will contribute (as the OP Contribution) the wholly-owned full-service
hotel assets held by such entities, certain interests in the Partnerships and
the Private Partnerships and certain other
 
                                       4

<PAGE>
 
assets to the Operating Partnership in exchange for a number of OP Units equal
to the number of shares of Host REIT Common Stock that will be outstanding upon
the completion of the REIT Conversion (reduced by any OP Units to be owned by
subsidiaries of Host REIT). Following these contributions, the Operating
Partnership and its subsidiaries will directly or indirectly own all of Host's
and its subsidiaries' wholly-owned hotels, substantially all of Host's direct
and indirect interests in both the Partnerships and the Private Partnerships
and all of Host's other assets (excluding its senior living assets and the cash
and any other consideration to be distributed as part of the Initial E&P
Distribution and certain other de minimis assets that cannot be contributed to
the Operating Partnership). These contributions, which include the OP
Contribution, will enable Host REIT, following the Reincorporation by means of
the Merger, to operate together with the Operating Partnership in an umbrella
partnership REIT ("UPREIT") structure, through which Host REIT would continue
the full-service hotel ownership business currently conducted by Host, and
which is expected to improve Host REIT's ability to acquire additional hotel
and other properties in the future on favorable terms. See "The Restructuring
Transactions--The OP Contribution."
 
  Federal Income Tax Consequences of the OP Contribution. Section 721 of the
Code provides that no gain or loss is recognized in the case of a contribution
of property to a partnership in exchange for an interest in the partnership.
However, there are a number of potential exceptions to the availability of such
treatment. The application of these exceptions is highly complex and depends
upon a number of factual determinations and other outside events which may or
may not occur, but Host believes that it will not recognize a material amount
of gain in connection with the OP Contribution. See "Federal Income Tax
Consequences--Federal Income Tax Consequences of the OP Contribution."
 
  The Reincorporation by Means of the Merger. If the requisite stockholder
approval of the Agreement is obtained and the other conditions to consummation
of the Restructuring Transactions and the REIT Conversion (including, among
others, determination by the Host Board of Directors that Host REIT can elect
to be treated as a REIT for federal income tax purposes effective no later than
the first full taxable year commencing after the REIT Conversion is completed,
approval of the Host REIT Common Stock for listing on the New York Stock
Exchange (the "NYSE"), the receipt of governmental and material third-party
consents and certain other conditions relating to the REIT Conversion) are
satisfied or waived, then pursuant to the Merger, Host would be merged with and
into Host REIT, Host REIT would be the surviving entity in the Merger, the
separate existence of Host would terminate and each issued and outstanding
share of Host Common Stock, together with the associated Host Right under the
Host Rights Agreement, would be converted into one share of Host REIT Common
Stock, in accordance with the terms of the Agreement. In addition, in the
Merger, outstanding options and other rights to acquire Host Common Stock would
be converted into rights to acquire Host REIT Common Stock, subject to
adjustment for the Initial E&P Distribution. It is expected that, upon
consummation of the Merger, the Host REIT Common Stock will be listed and trade
on the NYSE under the "HMT" symbol in the same manner as shares of Host Common
Stock currently trade on the NYSE. See "The Restructuring Transactions--
Conditions to the Restructuring Transactions" and "--Absence of Dissenters'
Rights."
 
  Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Merger. The Merger is expected to
qualify as a tax-free reorganization within the meaning of Section 368(a) of
the Code. Accordingly, no gain or loss will be recognized by Host or Host REIT
as a result of the Merger. In addition, (i) no gain or loss will be recognized
by holders of shares of Host Common Stock upon the conversion of such shares
into Host REIT Common Stock (except for certain stockholders who are not
considered "U.S. persons" for purposes of the Code and who own (or have owned)
in excess of 5% of Host); (ii) the tax basis of shares of Host REIT Common
Stock received by a former holder of Host Common Stock pursuant to the Merger
in the aggregate will be the same as the holder's adjusted tax basis in the
shares of Host Common Stock being converted in the Merger (subject to any
adjustment resulting from the Initial E&P Distribution); and (iii) the holding
period of shares of Host REIT Common Stock received by a former holder of Host
Common Stock pursuant to the Merger will include the holder's holding period
with respect to the shares of Host Common Stock being converted in the Merger,
assuming that the Host Common
 
                                       5

<PAGE>
 
Stock was held as a capital asset at the effective time of the Merger. See
"Federal Income Tax Consequences--Federal Income Tax Consequences of the
Merger."
 
  The Initial E&P Distribution. In order to qualify as a REIT for federal
income tax purposes, Host REIT and/or Host, as its predecessor, must have
distributed all of the accumulated "earnings and profits" ("E&P") of Host to
their stockholders in one or more taxable dividends prior to the end of the
first full taxable year for which the REIT election of Host is effective, which
currently is expected to be the taxable year commencing January 1, 1999. In
order to help accomplish the requisite distributions of the accumulated E&P of
Host, Host or Host REIT will make the Initial E&P Distribution, consisting of
one or more taxable distributions to their stockholders consisting of shares of
common stock of Crestline, and cash or other consideration in an amount to be
determined, in connection with the REIT Conversion. Although there is no
assurance that such other consideration comprising the Initial E&P Distribution
will take this form, it is currently contemplated that such other consideration
will consist of a specified dollar amount of cash or a specified fraction of a
share of Host Common Stock (or a share of Host REIT Common Stock if the Merger
has occurred), as elected by the Host stockholders. The actual amount of the
Initial E&P Distribution will be based in part upon the estimated amount of
accumulated E&P of Host as of the last day of its taxable year ending on or
immediately following completion of the REIT Conversion. To the extent that the
Initial E&P Distribution is not sufficient to eliminate Host's estimated
accumulated E&P, Host REIT will make one or more additional taxable
distributions to its stockholders (in the form of cash or securities) prior to
the last day of Host REIT's first full taxable year as a REIT (currently
expected to be December 31, 1999) in an amount intended to be sufficient to
eliminate such E&P, and the Operating Partnership will make corresponding
distributions to all holders of OP Units (including Host REIT) in an amount
sufficient to permit Host REIT to make such additional distributions. See "The
REIT Conversion--The Initial E&P Distribution."
 
  Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Initial E&P Distribution. Generally,
the Initial E&P Distribution will be a taxable dividend to a Host stockholder
to the extent that the Initial E&P Distribution is made out of the Host
stockholder's share of the portion of the current and accumulated E&P of Host
and Host REIT allocable to the Initial E&P Distribution. Host and Host REIT
currently believe that the substantial majority, if not all, of the Initial E&P
Distribution (the fair market value of which Host currently estimates will
range from approximately $2.10 to $2.50 per share of Host Common Stock) will be
considered made out of such E&P and, therefore, will be taxable as a dividend.
See "Federal Income Tax Consequences--Federal Income Tax Consequences of the
Initial E&P Distribution."
 
  The Ownership Limit. Primarily to satisfy certain additional requirements
under the Code that are applicable to REITs in general, the Ownership Limit
under the Host REIT Articles of Incorporation (the "Host REIT Charter") will
provide that no person or persons acting as a group may own, or be deemed to
own by virtue of the attribution provisions of the Code, more than 9.8% of the
lesser of the number or value of shares of Host REIT Common Stock (or any other
class or series of Host REIT preferred stock) outstanding, subject to waiver or
modification by Host REIT in certain limited circumstances and to certain
limited exceptions for a holder of shares of Host REIT Common Stock solely by
reason of the Merger so long as such holder would not own, directly or by
attribution under the Code, more than 9.8% by value of the outstanding capital
stock of Host REIT after the Merger. The Ownership Limit would become effective
as of 12:01 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the day following the Effective Date (the
"Ownership Limit Effective Time"). See "Description of Host REIT Capital
Stock--Restrictions on Ownership and Transfer."
 
  Other Transactions Comprising the REIT Conversion. In addition to the
Restructuring Transactions and the Initial E&P Distribution, the REIT
Conversion includes the following transactions, among others: (i) the recently
completed refinancing and amendment of the debt securities and certain credit
facilities of Host substantially in the manner described herein; (ii) the
Partnership Mergers (if and to the extent consummated); (iii) the Private
Partnership Transactions (if and to the extent consummated); (iv) the
Blackstone Acquisition (if and to the extent consummated); (v) the creation and
capitalization of the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries; (vi)
 
                                       6

<PAGE>
 
the leasing of the Hotels to the Lessees; and (vii) such other related
transactions and such other steps occurring prior to, substantially concurrent
with or within a reasonable time after the Effective Date as may be necessary
or desirable to complete the transactions contemplated herein or otherwise to
permit Host REIT to elect to be treated as a REIT for federal income tax
purposes. See "The REIT Conversion--Other Transactions Comprising the REIT
Conversion."
 
  Because REITs are not permitted under current federal income tax law to
derive revenues directly from the operation of hotels, Host REIT will lease the
Hotels to Lessees that will operate the Hotels under the existing long-term
management agreements (the "Management Agreements") and pay rent to Host REIT
as more fully described under "Business and Properties--The Leases." The
Lessees will be indirect wholly-owned subsidiaries of Crestline. Crestline,
which currently is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Host, will become a separate
public company when Host or Host REIT distributes the common stock of Crestline
and cash and other consideration to its existing stockholders (and the
Blackstone Entities) in connection with the Initial E&P Distribution. Shares of
Host REIT and Crestline will be separately traded securities, and the companies
will operate independently. There will be no overlap between the boards of Host
REIT and Crestline. There will be a substantial overlap of stockholders of the
two companies initially, but this overlap will diverge over time.
 
  As the first step in a strategy to acquire non-Marriott as well as Marriott
branded hotels, Host has entered into an agreement with various affiliates of
the Blackstone Entities to acquire from the Blackstone Entities ownership of,
or controlling interests in, twelve upscale and luxury full-service hotel
properties (the "Blackstone Hotels") and certain other related assets
(including a mortgage loan secured by an additional hotel) in exchange for a
combination of cash and the assumption of debt totalling $862 million, 43.7
million OP Units (based upon a negotiated value of $20.00 per OP Unit) and up
to 18% of the shares of Crestline common stock and other consideration. If the
Blackstone Acquisition is consummated, the interests in the Blackstone Hotels
will be contributed by the Blackstone Entities to the Operating Partnership as
part of the REIT Conversion. The Blackstone Hotels will be leased to Lessees
that are subsidiaries of Crestline and will continue to be managed under their
existing management agreements. See "Business and Properties--Blackstone
Acquisition."
 
  Reasons for the Restructuring Transactions and the REIT Conversion. The Host
Board of Directors is proposing the Restructuring Transactions primarily for
the following reasons:
 
  . The Restructuring Transactions are essential components of Host's
    conversion to REIT status for federal income tax purposes. In particular,
    the OP Contribution will enable Host REIT, following the Merger, to
    operate, together with the Operating Partnership, in an UPREIT structure,
    through which Host REIT would continue the full-service hotel ownership
    business currently conducted by Host. Host believes that the UPREIT
    structure will improve its ability to acquire additional properties in
    the future on favorable terms. Specifically, under certain circumstances,
    OP Units could be issued to acquire properties in transactions that would
    not trigger immediate tax obligations for certain sellers. Accordingly,
    converting to an UPREIT structure could enable Host REIT to acquire
    hotels and other properties in the future at lower prices because of the
    tax advantages to some sellers of receiving OP Units as consideration. OP
    Units would subsequently be redeemable for cash or common stock of Host
    REIT (at the option of Host REIT) at such time as the recipient desires
    liquidity.
 
  . The provisions of Maryland law have generally been viewed as favorable to
    REITs organized in corporate or trust form, as evidenced by the large
    number of publicly-traded REITs that have chosen to operate as a regular
    Maryland corporation or as a special statutory Maryland real estate
    investment trust. According to the National Association of Real Estate
    Investment Trusts, Inc. ("NAREIT"), as of September 1998, there were over
    100 publicly-traded REITs organized under Maryland law.
 
  . In order to satisfy certain requirements that are applicable to REITs in
    general, many REITs impose ownership limits and transfer restrictions,
    similar to the Ownership Limit under Host REIT's Charter, by
 
                                       7

<PAGE>
 
   inclusion of such provisions in their charters. Under Delaware law, such
   restrictions would not be binding with respect to securities issued prior
   to adoption of the restriction unless holders of such securities agree to
   or vote in favor of such restriction. However, under Maryland law and by
   reason of the Merger, all shares of Host REIT Common Stock issued in the
   Merger and thereafter would be subject to the Ownership Limit, for which
   express statutory authority exists under Maryland law.
 
  . Host's principal executive offices and a substantial number of Host's
    employees are employed in Maryland.
 
  The Board of Directors of Host believes that the Restructuring Transactions
and the other transactions comprising the REIT Conversion are advisable for
Host and its stockholders based on the belief that:
 
  . The REIT structure, as a more tax efficient structure, will provide
    improved operating results through changing economic conditions and all
    phases of the hotel economic cycle.
 
  . The REIT Conversion, which will reduce corporate-level taxes and the need
    to incur debt to reduce corporate taxes through interest deductions, will
    improve its financial flexibility and allow it to continue to strengthen
    its balance sheet by reducing its overall debt to equity ratio over time.
 
  . As a REIT, Host will be able to compete more effectively with other
    public lodging real estate companies that already are organized as REITs
    and to make performance comparisons with its peers more meaningful.
 
  . By becoming a dividend paying company, Host's stockholder base will
    expand to include investors attracted by yield as well as asset quality.
 
  . The adoption of an UPREIT structure will facilitate tax-deferred
    acquisition of additional hotels (such as in the case of the Blackstone
    Acquisition and the Partnership Mergers).
 
  See "The Restructuring Transactions--Background and Reasons for the
Restructuring Transactions and the REIT Conversion."
 
  Certain Effects of the REIT Conversion. The Host Board believes that Host's
conversion to a REIT and the distribution of Crestline shares as part of the
Initial E&P Distribution will benefit Host's stockholders by providing them
with a tax advantaged REIT security that is expected to provide both the
opportunity for regular cash dividends and capital appreciation as Host REIT
acquires additional properties, as well as a continuing interest in Crestline,
Host's senior living company and the initial lessee of substantially all of
Host REIT's hotels, if a Host stockholder so desires. As a REIT, Host REIT
would be able to benefit from the tax advantages that apply to REITs, and
stockholders would receive quarterly distributions that are expected to be at
least sufficient to satisfy the annual distribution requirements applicable to
REITs under the Code. The Host Board believes that this will highlight the
value of Host REIT's hotel properties and permit stockholders to realize a
regular cash return on that value. Upon completion of the REIT Conversion,
Crestline is expected to own Host's 31 senior living communities, which will
continue to be managed by Marriott International, and a 25% interest in the
Swissotel management company expected to be acquired in the Blackstone
Acquisition, and will lease substantially all of the hotels owned by Host REIT
and its affiliates, as further described in this Proxy Statement/Prospectus. At
that time, Crestline will operate independently of Host, will be publicly
traded and separately listed on the NYSE, and will pursue its own growth
opportunities.
 
  Following the Restructuring Transactions and the other transactions
comprising the REIT Conversion (including the Blackstone Acquisition), Host
REIT and its subsidiaries are expected initially to own outright, or have
controlling interests in, approximately 125 full-service hotels operated
primarily under the Marriott, Ritz-Carlton, Four Seasons, Swissotel and Hyatt
brand names (the "Hotels"). Upon completion of the REIT
 
                                       8

<PAGE>
 
Conversion, Host REIT will be the sole general partner of the Operating
Partnership and is expected to own approximately 76% of the OP Units in the
Operating Partnership, and the remaining OP Units, which are intended to be
substantially equivalent on an economic basis to shares of Host REIT Common
Stock, will be owned by the limited partners (that are unaffiliated with Host)
of the Partnerships participating in the Partnership Mergers (the "Limited
Partners"), unaffiliated partners of the Private Partnerships and the
Blackstone Entities. Host REIT and its subsidiaries will own a number of OP
Units equal to the number of shares of Host REIT Common Stock outstanding. Host
REIT will be managed by its Board of Directors and will have no employees who
are not also employees of the Operating Partnership.
 
  Although a number of the transactions comprising the REIT Conversion are
expected to be consummated immediately prior to, or in certain instances,
immediately following the Merger, the Merger will not be consummated unless
Host's Board of Directors has determined prior to consummating the Merger that
the conditions to the Merger have been satisfied or waived, and in particular,
that the transactions constituting the REIT Conversion which impact Host REIT's
status as a REIT for federal income tax purposes have occurred or are
reasonably likely to occur, and based on advice of counsel, that Host REIT can
elect to be treated as a REIT for federal income tax purposes effective no
later than the first full taxable year commencing after the REIT Conversion is
completed. In the event the Agreement is not approved by Host stockholders at
the Special Meeting, Host will continue to operate as a Delaware corporation,
and the REIT Conversion will not be completed.
 
RISK FACTORS
 
  The following is a summary of the material risks associated with the
Restructuring Transactions and the other transactions comprising the REIT
Conversion. This summary is qualified in its entirety by the detailed
discussion in the section entitled "Risk Factors" contained in this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus. Some of the significant matters that stockholders of Host
should consider carefully when voting on the Agreement, and the transactions
contemplated thereby, include:
 
  . Lack of Control over Hotel Operations and Non-Controlled
    Subsidiaries. Due to current federal income tax law restrictions on a
    REIT's ability to derive revenues directly from the operation of a hotel,
    Host REIT will lease virtually all of its consolidated Hotels to the
    Lessees, which will operate the Hotels by continuing to retain the
    existing managers of the Hotels (the "Managers") pursuant to the existing
    long-term Management Agreements. Host REIT will not operate the Hotels or
    participate in the decisions affecting the daily operations of the
    Hotels. Host REIT will have only a limited ability to require the Lessees
    or the Managers to operate or manage the Hotels in any particular manner,
    and no ability to govern any particular aspect of their day-to-day
    operation or management. Host REIT also will not own any of the voting
    stock of the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries, which may own up to 20% in the
    aggregate by value of Host REIT's assets. Therefore, Host REIT will be
    dependent for its revenue upon the ability of the Lessees and the
    Managers to operate and manage the Hotels and the Non-Controlled
    Subsidiaries to operate and manage their businesses.
 
  . Dependence upon Crestline. Crestline and its subsidiaries will be the
    Lessees of substantially all of the Hotels and their rent payments will
    be the primary source of Host REIT's revenues. Crestline's financial
    condition and ability to meet its obligations under the Leases will
    determine the Operating Partnership's ability to make distributions to
    holders of OP Units, including Host REIT, and Host REIT's ability, in
    turn, to make distributions to its stockholders. As of June 19, 1998, on
    a pro forma basis, after giving effect to the REIT Conversion, Crestline
    would have had approximately $315 million of indebtedness (including $100
    million due to Host REIT to pay for hotel working capital purchased from
    Host REIT but not including guarantees of obligations of Crestline's
    subsidiaries under the Leases and the Management Agreements), and
    Crestline can incur additional indebtedness in the future. There can be
    no assurance that Crestline will have sufficient assets, income and
    access to financing to enable it to satisfy its obligations under the
    Leases. In addition, the credit rating of the Operating Partnership and
    Host REIT will be affected by the general creditworthiness of Crestline.
 
                                       9

<PAGE>
 
 
  . Responsibilities of Host REIT to Other Limited Partners in the Operating
    Partnership. After the REIT Conversion, Host REIT, as the sole general
    partner of the Operating Partnership, will have fiduciary obligations to
    the limited partners in the Operating Partnership, and the discharge of
    such obligations may result in decisions that do not fully reflect the
    interests of Host REIT's stockholders.
 
  . Relationships with Marriott International and Crestline. Marriott
    International currently serves as manager for all but 16 of Host's
    Hotels, and will continue to manage those Hotels pursuant to the
    Management Agreements that will be assigned to the Lessees. In addition,
    Marriott International acts as manager of hotels that compete with Host
    REIT's Hotels. As a result, Marriott International may make decisions
    regarding competing lodging facilities which it manages that would not
    necessarily be in the best interests of Host REIT or the Lessees.
    Further, J.W. Marriott, Jr. and Richard E. Marriott, who are brothers,
    currently serve as directors of Host and directors (and, in the case of
    J.W. Marriott, Jr., also an officer) of Marriott International. After the
    REIT Conversion, J.W. Marriott, Jr. will serve as a director of Host REIT
    and will continue to serve as a director of Marriott International, and
    Richard E. Marriott will serve as Chairman of the Board of Host REIT and
    continue to serve as a director of Marriott International. J.W. Marriott,
    Jr. and Richard E. Marriott also beneficially own approximately  % and
     %, respectively, of the outstanding shares of common stock of Marriott
    International, and will beneficially own  % and  %, respectively, of the
    outstanding shares of common stock of Crestline (but neither will serve
    as an officer or director thereof). As a result, J.W. Marriott, Jr. and
    Richard E. Marriott may have a potential conflict of interest with
    respect to their obligations as directors of Host REIT in connection with
    any decisions regarding Marriott International itself (including
    decisions relating to the Management Agreements involving the Hotels),
    Marriott International's management of competing lodging properties and
    Crestline's leasing and other businesses that would not necessarily be in
    the best interests of Host REIT.
 
  . Current Host Common Stock Price Is Not Necessarily Indicative of the
    Price of Host REIT Common Stock Following the REIT Conversion. Host's
    current stock price is not necessarily indicative of how the market will
    value Host REIT Common Stock following the REIT Conversion. The current
    stock price of Host reflects the current market valuation of Host's
    current business and assets (including the Crestline common stock and
    cash or other consideration to be distributed in connection with the
    Initial E&P Distribution) and not solely the business and assets of Host
    REIT following the REIT Conversion. Host's current stock price also is
    affected by general market conditions.
 
  . Cash Distributions May Exceed Cash Available for Distribution. The
    preliminary estimated initial annual cash distributions of the Operating
    Partnership during the twelve months ending December 31, 1999 ($226
    million) will exceed its estimated pro forma cash available for
    distribution during the twelve months ending December 31, 1999 ($214
    million), which would require borrowings of approximately $13 million
    (including interest thereon of $1 million) to make such distributions in
    accordance with the Operating Partnership's distribution policy.
 
  . Timing of the Restructuring Transactions and the REIT Conversion. If the
    Restructuring Transactions and the other transactions comprising the REIT
    Conversion do not occur in time for Host REIT to elect REIT status
    effective January 1, 1999, the effectiveness of Host REIT's election
    could be delayed to January 1, 2000, which would result in Host or Host
    REIT continuing to pay substantial corporate-level income taxes in 1999
    and could cause the Blackstone Acquisition not to be consummated.
 
  . Uncertainties at the Time of Voting on the Agreement. There are several
    uncertainties relating to the REIT Conversion that will exist at the time
    Host stockholders vote on the Agreement, including: (i) the occurrence of
    the Blackstone Acquisition, (ii) the results of the Partnership Mergers
    and the number and value of the OP Units to be issued to the Limited
    Partners therein, (iii) the assets and liabilities of the Non-Controlled
    Subsidiaries and (iv) the value and components of the Initial E&P
    Distribution. There is no assurance as to the outcome of such matters,
    and if certain of these transactions or events are not
 
                                       10

<PAGE>
 
   consummated as expected, the value of Host REIT Common Stock and the
   amount of cash available for distribution to stockholders could be
   adversely affected, and Host REIT could fail to qualify as a REIT for
   federal income tax purposes.
 
  . Inability to Obtain Third-Party Consents May Have a Material Adverse
    Effect. There are numerous third-party consents which are required to be
    obtained in order to consummate the Restructuring Transactions and the
    other transactions comprising the REIT Conversion. The inability of Host,
    the Operating Partnership or Host REIT to obtain one or more such
    consents could cause a default under cross-default provisions of the
    Company's principal credit facilities or otherwise have a material
    adverse effect on the Operating Partnership and Host REIT and thus could
    reduce the value of Host REIT Common Stock.
 
  . Expiration of the Leases and Possible Inability to Find Other
    Lessees. The Leases generally will expire seven to ten years after the
    Effective Date, and there can be no assurance that the affected Hotels
    will be relet (or if relet, will be relet on terms as favorable to Host
    REIT). If the Hotels are not relet to the Lessees, Host REIT will be
    required to find other lessees, which lessees must meet certain
    requirements set forth in the Management Agreements and the Code. There
    can be no assurance that satisfactory lessees could be found or as to the
    terms and conditions on which Host REIT would be able to relet the Hotels
    or enter into new leases with such lessees, which could result in a
    failure of Host REIT to qualify as a REIT or in reduced cash available
    for distribution.
 
  . Leases Could Impair the Sale or Other Disposition of Host REIT's
    Hotels. Each Lease generally provides for a termination payment if the
    Lease is terminated by Host REIT prior to the expiration of the term of
    such Lease, except following a default by a Lessee and in certain other
    circumstances (including in connection with the sale of up to 12 Hotels
    without a termination payment) or unless Host REIT leases to the Lessee a
    comparable substitute hotel. The payment of such termination fee under
    the Leases could have the effect of impairing the ability of Host REIT to
    sell its Hotels if market conditions otherwise warrant such a sale and
    would reduce the net proceeds of any such sale.
 
  . Limitations on Sale or Refinancing of Certain Hotels. For reasons
    relating to federal income tax considerations, the agreements by which
    the Operating Partnership will acquire certain Hotels (or obtain consent
    to lease certain Hotels to the Lessees) will also restrict the ability of
    the Operating Partnership to dispose of or refinance the debt secured by
    such Hotels for varying periods from the Effective Date, depending on the
    Hotel. Similarly, the Operating Partnership will agree generally not to
    dispose of the Blackstone Hotels for five years or ten years, depending
    on the circumstances. Thus, it may be difficult or impossible for Host
    REIT to sell such Hotels or refinance such debt during their respective
    lock-out periods.
 
  . Possible Adverse Consequences of the Ownership Limit. Any shares of Host
    REIT Common Stock held as of the Ownership Limit Effective Time, or
    thereafter acquired in violation of the Ownership Limit, will be
    transferred automatically to a trust for the benefit of a designated
    charitable beneficiary, and the person holding such excess shares of Host
    REIT Common Stock will not be entitled to any distributions thereon or to
    vote such excess shares of Host REIT Common Stock. If excess shares of
    Host REIT Common Stock are held as of the Ownership Limit Effective Time,
    the holder of such excess shares of Host REIT Common Stock will receive
    the lesser of the value of such excess shares as of the Ownership Limit
    Effective Time or the cash proceeds of the sale of such excess shares of
    Host REIT Common Stock by the designated charitable beneficiary.
    Thereafter, any person who acquires Host REIT Common Stock in excess of
    the Ownership Limit will not receive any proceeds from the subsequent
    sale thereof in excess of the lesser of the price paid therefor or the
    amount realized from such sale. As a result, the Ownership Limit would
    adversely effect the value of any Host REIT Common Stock held in excess
    of the Ownership Limit. In addition, the Ownership Limit may have the
    effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of Host
    REIT and, as a result, could adversely effect the value of Host REIT
    Common Stock.
 
  . Anti-Takeover Effect of Certain Provisions of the Host REIT Charter and
    Bylaws, Maryland Law, and the Stockholder Rights Plan. The Host REIT
    Charter and the bylaws of Host REIT (the "Host REIT
 
                                       11

<PAGE>
 
   Bylaws") to be effective upon completion of the Merger, as well as
   provisions of Maryland law, contain certain provisions that could have the
   effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of Host
   REIT. These provisions could limit the price that certain investors might
   be willing to pay in the future for Host REIT Common Stock. Certain of
   these provisions provide for a staggered board and allow Host REIT to
   issue, without stockholder approval, preferred stock having rights senior
   to those of the Host REIT Common Stock. The Board of Directors also is
   authorized, without a vote of stockholders, to classify or reclassify
   unissued common stock or preferred stock into another class or series of
   stock. Other provisions impose various procedural and other requirements
   that could make it difficult for stockholders to effect certain corporate
   actions. The Host REIT Charter also provides that no person or persons
   acting as a group may own more that 9.8% (in number or value) of the
   outstanding shares of any class or series of Host REIT stock. Host REIT
   also intends to adopt a Stockholder Rights Plan to replace the existing
   stockholder rights plan of Host. Host REIT also will become subject to the
   business combination and control share provisions under Maryland law. Host
   REIT also will become subject to the business combination and control
   share provisions under Maryland law. Marriott International has the right
   to purchase 20% of each class of Host's outstanding voting stock at the
   then fair market value upon the occurrence of certain change of control
   (or potential change of control) events involving Host, which right will
   continue in effect after the Merger until June 2017, subject to certain
   limitations intended to protect the REIT status of Host REIT. See "Certain
   Provisions of Maryland Law and the Host REIT Charter and Bylaws--Marriott
   International Purchase Right."
 
  . Failure of Host REIT to Qualify as a REIT for Tax Purposes. Taxation of
    Host REIT as a corporation if it fails to qualify as a REIT, and Host
    REIT's subsequent liability for federal, state and local taxes on its
    income and property, would, among other things, have the effect of
    reducing cash available for distribution to Host REIT's stockholders and
    materially reducing the value of the Host REIT Common Stock.
 
  . Change in Tax Laws. No assurance can be provided that new legislation,
    Treasury Regulations, administrative interpretations or court decisions
    will not significantly change the tax laws with respect to Host REIT's
    qualification as a REIT or the federal income tax consequences of such
    qualification.
 
  . Failure of the Operating Partnership to Qualify as a Partnership for Tax
    Purposes. Taxation of the Operating Partnership as a corporation if it
    fails to qualify as a partnership and the Operating Partnership's
    subsequent liability for federal, state and local income taxes would,
    among other things, have the effect of reducing cash available for
    distributions and would cause Host REIT to fail to qualify as a REIT for
    tax purposes.
 
  . Failure of the Leases to Qualify as Leases. If one or more of the Leases
    of the Hotels to the Lessees were to be disregarded for tax purposes (for
    example, because a Lease was determined to lack economic substance), Host
    REIT would fail to qualify as a REIT and the Operating Partnership might
    be treated as a corporation for federal income tax purposes, all of which
    would have a material adverse impact on Host REIT and the value of the
    Host REIT Common Stock.
 
  . Host REIT's Substantial Deferred and Contingent Tax Liabilities. Host
    REIT will have substantial deferred tax liabilities attributable to
    Host's assets and operations that are likely to be recognized in the next
    ten years (notwithstanding Host REIT's status as a REIT), and the IRS
    could assert substantial additional liabilities for taxes against Host
    for taxable years prior to the time Host REIT qualifies as a REIT.
 
  . Competition in the Lodging Industry. The profitability of the Hotels is
    subject to general economic conditions, the management abilities of the
    Managers (including primarily Marriott International), competition, the
    desirability of particular locations and other factors relating to the
    operation of the Hotels. The full-service segment of the lodging
    industry, in which virtually all of the Hotels operate, is highly
    competitive, and the Hotels generally operate in geographical markets
    that contain numerous competitors. The Hotels' success will be dependent,
    in large part, upon their ability to compete in such
 
                                       12

<PAGE>
 
   areas as access, location, quality of accommodations, room rate structure,
   the quality and scope of food and beverage facilities and other services
   and amenities. The lodging industry, including the Hotels (and thus Host
   REIT), may be adversely affected in the future by (i) national and
   regional economic conditions, (ii) changes in travel patterns, (iii) taxes
   and government regulations which influence or determine wages, prices,
   interest rates, construction procedures and costs, (iv) the availability
   of credit and (v) other factors beyond the control of Host REIT.
 
  . Substantial Indebtedness of Host REIT. Host REIT will have substantial
    indebtedness. As of June 19, 1998, on a pro forma basis assuming the Full
    Participation Scenario, Host REIT had outstanding indebtedness totaling
    $5.0 billion, which represents an approximately 55% debt-to-total market
    capitalization ratio on a pro forma basis at such date (based upon an
    assumed price per share of Host REIT Common Stock of $13.00 after giving
    effect to the REIT Conversion). Host REIT's business is capital
    intensive, and it will have significant capital requirements in the
    future. Host REIT's leverage level could affect its ability to (i) obtain
    financing in the future, (ii) undertake refinancings on terms and subject
    to conditions deemed acceptable by Host REIT, (iii) make distributions,
    (iv) pursue its acquisition strategy or (v) compete effectively or
    operate successfully under adverse economic conditions.
 
  . No Limitation on Debt. There are no limitations in the Operating
    Partnership's or Host REIT's organizational documents limiting the amount
    of indebtedness that either may incur, although certain of Host REIT's
    debt instruments will contain a number of restrictions on the amount of
    indebtedness that Host REIT may incur. In addition, Host REIT will have a
    policy of incurring debt only if upon such incurrence the debt-to-total
    market capitalization of Host REIT and the Operating Partnership would be
    60% or less. If Host REIT's policy of incurring debt were changed, Host
    REIT could become more highly leveraged which could adversely affect Host
    REIT's cash flow and the cash available for distribution to stockholders
    of Host REIT, and could increase the risk of default on Host REIT's
    indebtedness.
 
  . The Board May Change Investment Policies Without Stockholder
    Approval. Host REIT's Board of Directors may change the investment,
    financing and other policies of Host REIT without stockholder approval.
    Such policy changes may have adverse consequences to Host REIT.
 
  . Management Agreements Could Impair the Sale or Other Disposition of Host
    REIT's Hotels. The Hotels generally may not be sold or otherwise
    transferred unless the transferee assumes the Management Agreements
    relating thereto and meets certain other conditions. The possible desire
    of Host REIT, from time to time, to finance, refinance or effect a sale
    of any of the properties managed by Marriott International (which
    currently serves as manager for all but 16 of Host REIT's Hotels) may,
    depending upon the structure of such transactions, result in a need to
    modify the Management Agreements with Marriott International with respect
    to such property. The lack of consent from Marriott International could
    adversely affect Host REIT's ability to consummate such financing or
    sale.
 
DATE, TIME, PLACE AND PURPOSE OF SPECIAL MEETING
 
  The Special Meeting will be held at        on December  , 1998 at   , local
time, to approve the Agreement.
 
STOCKHOLDERS ENTITLED TO VOTE
 
  The Board of Directors has fixed the close of business on November  , 1998 as
the Record Date for the determination of stockholders entitled to receive
notice of and vote at the Special Meeting. As of the Record Date, Host had
outstanding and entitled to vote     shares of Host Common Stock and
holders of record. See "Voting and Proxies."
 
 
                                       13

<PAGE>
 
VOTE REQUIRED; NO DISSENTERS' RIGHTS
 
  Under the Delaware General Corporation Law, as amended (the "DGCL"), the
affirmative vote of a majority of the outstanding capital stock of the
corporation entitled to vote thereon is needed to adopt a merger agreement.
Similarly, if the OP Contribution were deemed to constitute a sale, lease or
exchange of all or substantially all of the assets of Host under the DGCL, the
affirmative vote of a majority of the outstanding capital stock of the
corporation entitled to vote thereon would be needed to approve the OP
Contribution. Pursuant to Host's Restated Certificate of Incorporation (the
"Host Certificate"), the affirmative vote of the holders of two-thirds (66
2/3%) of the outstanding shares of Host Common Stock is necessary for approval
of the Merger, as well as the OP Contribution if it were deemed to constitute a
sale, lease or exchange of all or substantially all of the assets of Host. On
the Record Date, directors and executive officers of Host, together with their
affiliates, as a group, beneficially owned approximately  % of the issued and
outstanding shares of Host Common Stock. It is currently expected that each
director and executive officer of Host will vote the shares of Host Common
Stock beneficially owned by such director or executive officer for approval of
the Agreement and the transactions contemplated thereby. See "Principal
Stockholders."
 
  Under the DGCL, Host's stockholders will not be entitled to dissenters'
rights of appraisal as a result of the Merger or other Restructuring
Transactions. See "Voting and Proxies" and "The Restructuring Transactions--
Absence of Dissenters' Rights."
 
  IF THE RESTRUCTURING TRANSACTIONS AND THE OTHER TRANSACTIONS COMPRISING THE
REIT CONVERSION DO NOT OCCUR IN TIME FOR HOST REIT TO ELECT REIT STATUS
EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 1999, THE EFFECTIVENESS OF HOST REIT'S ELECTION COULD BE
DELAYED TO JANUARY 1, 2000, WHICH WOULD RESULT IN HOST OR HOST REIT CONTINUING
TO PAY SUBSTANTIAL CORPORATE-LEVEL INCOME TAXES IN 1999 AND COULD CAUSE THE
BLACKSTONE ACQUISITION NOT TO BE CONSUMMATED. THEREFORE, IT IS EXTREMELY
IMPORTANT THAT STOCKHOLDERS RETURN THE PROXY CARDS AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. ANY
DELAY IN RETURNING PROXIES COULD CAUSE THE SPECIAL MEETING TO BE DELAYED, WHICH
COULD PREVENT THE RESTRUCTURING TRANSACTIONS AND THE OTHER TRANSACTIONS
COMPRISING THE REIT CONVERSION FROM BEING EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 1999.
 
THE RESTRUCTURING TRANSACTIONS
 
  Background and Reasons for The Restructuring Transactions and the REIT
Conversion. Host is proposing the Restructuring Transactions in connection with
a plan adopted by Host to restructure its business operations so that it will
qualify as a REIT under the Code. Host REIT expects to qualify as a REIT
beginning with its first full taxable year commencing after the REIT Conversion
is completed, which currently is expected to be the year commencing January 1,
1999. The Host Board of Directors is proposing the Restructuring Transactions
primarily for the following reasons:
 
  . The Restructuring Transactions are essential components of Host's
    conversion to REIT status for federal income tax purposes. In particular,
    the OP Contribution will enable Host REIT, following the Merger, to
    operate, together with the Operating Partnership, in an UPREIT structure,
    through which Host REIT would continue the full-service hotel ownership
    business currently conducted by Host. Host believes that the UPREIT
    structure will improve its ability to acquire additional properties in
    the future on favorable terms. Specifically, under certain circumstances,
    OP Units could be issued to acquire properties in transactions that would
    not trigger immediate tax obligations for certain sellers. Accordingly,
    converting to an UPREIT structure could enable Host REIT to acquire
    hotels and other properties in the future at lower prices because of the
    tax advantages to some sellers of receiving OP Units as consideration. OP
    Units would subsequently be redeemable for cash or common stock of Host
    REIT (at the option of Host REIT) at such time as the recipient desires
    liquidity.
 
  . The provisions of Maryland law have generally been viewed as favorable to
    REITs organized in corporate or trust form, as evidenced by the large
    number of publicly-traded REITs that have chosen to operate as a
 
                                       14

<PAGE>
 
   regular Maryland corporation or as a special statutory Maryland real
   estate investment trust. According to NAREIT, as of September 1998, there
   were over 100 publicly-traded REITs organized under Maryland law.
 
  . In particular, in order to satisfy certain requirements that are
    applicable to REITs in general, many REITs impose ownership limits and
    transfer restrictions, similar to the Ownership Limit under Host REIT's
    Charter, by inclusion of such provisions in their charters. Under
    Delaware law, such restrictions would not be binding with respect to
    securities issued prior to adoption of the restriction unless holders of
    such securities agree to or vote in favor of such restriction. However,
    under Maryland law and by reason of the Merger, all shares of Host REIT
    Common Stock issued in the Merger and thereafter would be subject to the
    Ownership Limit, for which express statutory authority exists under
    Maryland law.
 
  . Host's principal executive offices and a substantial number of Host's
    employees are employed in Maryland.
 
  The Board of Directors of Host believes that the Restructuring Transactions
and the other transactions comprising the REIT Conversion are advisable for
Host and its stockholders based on the belief that:
 
  . The REIT structure, as a more tax efficient structure, will provide
    improved operating results through changing economic conditions and all
    phases of the hotel economic cycle.
 
  . The REIT Conversion, which will reduce corporate-level taxes and the need
    to incur debt to reduce corporate taxes through interest deductions, will
    improve its financial flexibility and allow it to continue to strengthen
    its balance sheet by reducing its overall debt to equity ratio over time.
 
  . As a REIT, Host will be able to compete more effectively with other
    public lodging real estate companies that already are organized as REITs
    and to make performance comparisons with its peers more meaningful.
 
  . By becoming a dividend paying company, Host's stockholder base will
    expand to include investors attracted by yield as well as asset quality.
 
  . The adoption of an UPREIT structure will facilitate tax-deferred
    acquisition of additional hotels (such as in the case of the Blackstone
    Acquisition and the Partnership Mergers).
 
  Host explored the possibility of engaging in a business combination with a
so-called "paired share" REIT, Santa Anita, in December 1996 and January 1997.
Based upon an analysis of potential costs, the pricing of the transaction, the
time requirement to complete such a transaction and the possible legislative
risks associated with the "paired share" structure, Host decided not to pursue
such a transaction. During the fourth quarter of 1997, Host began to explore
internally the possibility of reorganizing as a REIT on a stand-alone basis. In
April 1998, Host decided that it would be advantageous for its stockholders if
Host were to convert to a REIT.
 
  The Host Board believes that Host's conversion to a REIT and the distribution
of Crestline shares as part of the Initial E&P Distribution will benefit Host's
stockholders by providing them with a tax advantaged REIT security that is
expected to provide both the opportunity for regular cash dividends and capital
appreciation as Host REIT acquires additional properties, as well as a
continuing interest in Crestline, Host's senior living company and the initial
lessee of substantially all of Host REIT's hotels, if a Host stockholder so
desires. If Host REIT qualifies for taxation as a REIT, it generally will not
be subject to federal corporate income taxes on that portion of its ordinary
income or capital gain that is distributed to stockholders. As a REIT, Host
REIT would be able to benefit from the tax advantages that apply to REITs, and
stockholders will receive quarterly distributions that are at least sufficient
to satisfy the annual distribution requirements applicable to REITs under the
Code. The Host Board believes that this will highlight the value of Host REIT's
hotel properties and permit stockholders to realize a regular cash return on
that value. Upon completion of the REIT Conversion, Crestline
 
                                       15

<PAGE>
 
is expected to own Host's 31 senior living communities, which will continue to
be managed by Marriott International, and a 25% interest in the Swissotel
management company expected to be acquired in the Blackstone Acquisition, and
will lease substantially all of the hotels owned by Host REIT and its
affiliates. At that time, Crestline will operate independently of Host, will be
publicly traded and separately listed on the NYSE, and will pursue its own
growth opportunities.
 
  Following the Restructuring Transactions and the other transactions
comprising the REIT Conversion (including the Blackstone Acquisition), Host
REIT and its subsidiaries are expected initially to own outright, or have
controlling interests in, approximately 125 full-service hotels operated
primarily under the Marriott, Ritz-Carlton, Four Seasons, Swissotel and Hyatt
brand names (the "Hotels"). Upon completion of the REIT Conversion, Host REIT
will be the sole general partner of the Operating Partnership and is expected
to own approximately 76% of the OP Units in the Operating Partnership, and the
remaining OP Units, which are intended to be substantially equivalent on an
economic basis to shares of Host REIT Common Stock, will be owned by the
limited partners (that are unaffiliated with Host) of the Partnerships
participating in the Partnership Mergers (the "Limited Partners"), unaffiliated
partners of the Private Partnerships and the Blackstone Entities. Host REIT and
its subsidiaries will own a number of OP Units equal to the number of shares of
Host REIT Common Stock outstanding. Host REIT will be managed by its Board of
Directors and will have no employees who are not also employees of the
Operating Partnership.
 
  ACCORDINGLY, THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF HOST BELIEVES THAT THE RESTRUCTURING
TRANSACTIONS ARE ADVISABLE FOR HOST AND ITS STOCKHOLDERS AND RECOMMENDS THAT
STOCKHOLDERS VOTE "FOR" APPROVAL OF THE AGREEMENT AND THE TRANSACTIONS
CONTEMPLATED THEREBY. In the event the Agreement is not approved by Host
stockholders at the Special Meeting, Host will continue to operate as a
Delaware corporation, and the REIT Conversion will not be completed. See "The
Restructuring Transactions--Background and Reasons for the Restructuring
Transactions and the REIT Conversion" and "--Comparison of Rights of
Stockholders of Host and Host REIT."
 
  The OP Contribution. As a preliminary step in the REIT Conversion, during
1998, various subsidiaries of Host will be contributing and, subject to
approval of the Agreement at the Special Meeting, after the Special Meeting
Host will contribute (as the OP Contribution) the wholly-owned full-service
hotel assets held by such entities, certain interests in the Partnerships and
the Private Partnerships (other than their interests in the general partners of
the Partnerships, each of which is Host or a wholly-owned, direct or indirect
subsidiary of Host, who will remain in existence as subsidiaries of Host REIT
and will receive OP Units in the Partnership Mergers) and certain of their
other assets (excluding Host's senior living assets and the cash and any other
consideration to be distributed in connection with the Initial E&P
Distribution, and certain other de minimis assets that cannot be contributed to
the Operating Partnership) to the Operating Partnership in exchange for (i) a
number of OP Units equal to the number of outstanding shares of Host Common
Stock at the completion of the REIT Conversion (reduced by the number of OP
Units to be received by the general partners of the Partnerships and other
subsidiaries of Host in the Partnership Mergers), (ii) preferred partnership
interests in the Operating Partnership corresponding to any shares of Host
preferred stock outstanding at the time of the REIT Conversion and (iii) the
assumption by the Operating Partnership of all liabilities of Host including
past and future contingent liabilities, other than liabilities of Crestline.
Following these contributions, the Operating Partnership and its subsidiaries
will directly or indirectly own all of Host's and its subsidiaries' wholly-
owned hotels, substantially all of Host's direct and indirect interests in both
the Partnerships and the Private Partnerships and all of Host's other assets
(excluding its senior living assets, the cash and other consideration to be
distributed in connection with the Initial E&P Distribution, and certain other
de minimis assets that cannot be contributed to the Operating Partnership). See
"The Restructuring Transactions--The OP Contribution."
 
  The above-described contributions, which include the OP Contribution, will
enable Host REIT, following the Reincorporation by means of the Merger, to
operate together with the Operating Partnership in an UPREIT
 
                                       16

<PAGE>
 
structure, which is expected to improve Host REIT's ability to acquire
additional hotels and other properties in the future on favorable terms.
 
  Terms of the Merger. The Reincorporation will be effected through the merger
of Host with and into Host REIT. As a result of the Merger, Host REIT will be
the surviving entity, the separate existence of Host will terminate and each
issued and outstanding share of Host Common Stock, together with the associated
Host Right, will be converted into one share of Host REIT Common Stock. In
addition, outstanding options and certain other rights to acquire Host Common
Stock will be converted into rights to acquire Host REIT Common Stock, subject
to adjustment for the Initial E&P Distribution. Following the Merger, the
holders of Host REIT Common Stock will become subject to the Ownership Limit
under the Host REIT Charter. THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT WILL PROVIDE THAT NO PERSON OR
PERSONS ACTING AS A GROUP MAY OWN, OR BE DEEMED TO OWN BY VIRTUE OF THE
ATTRIBUTION PROVISIONS OF THE CODE, MORE THAN (I) 9.8% OF THE LESSER OF THE
NUMBER OR VALUE OF SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK OUTSTANDING OR (II) 9.8% OF
THE LESSER OF THE NUMBER OR VALUE OF THE ISSUED AND OUTSTANDING SHARES OF ANY
CLASS OR SERIES OF HOST REIT PREFERRED STOCK, SUBJECT TO WAIVER OR MODIFICATION
BY HOST REIT IN CERTAIN LIMITED CIRCUMSTANCES AND SUBJECT TO (A) AN EXCEPTION
FOR A HOLDER OF SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK SOLELY BY REASON OF THE MERGER
SO LONG AS SUCH HOLDER WOULD NOT OWN, DIRECTLY OR BY ATTRIBUTION UNDER THE
CODE, MORE THAN 9.8% BY VALUE OF THE OUTSTANDING CAPITAL STOCK OF HOST REIT
AFTER THE MERGER, AND (B) A LIMITATION ON THE APPLICATION OF THE "GROUP"
LIMITATION (BUT NO OTHER ELEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT) TO ANY "GROUP" THAT
OTHERWISE WOULD EXCEED THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT AT THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT EFFECTIVE
TIME SOLELY BY REASON OF ITS STATUS AS A "GROUP." THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT WILL
BECOME APPLICABLE TO ALL HOST REIT STOCKHOLDERS AS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT
EFFECTIVE TIME. ANY SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK HELD AS OF, OR OTHERWISE
HELD AT ANY TIME AFTER, THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT EFFECTIVE TIME IN VIOLATION OF THE
OWNERSHIP LIMIT WILL BE TRANSFERRED AUTOMATICALLY TO A TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT OF
A DESIGNATED CHARITABLE BENEFICIARY, AND THE PERSON WHO ACQUIRED (OR HELD) SUCH
EXCESS SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY
DISTRIBUTIONS THEREON OR TO VOTE SUCH EXCESS SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK.
IF EXCESS SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK ARE HELD AS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT
EFFECTIVE TIME, THE HOLDER OF SUCH EXCESS SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK WILL
RECEIVE THE LESSER OF THE VALUE OF SUCH EXCESS SHARES AS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT
EFFECTIVE TIME OR THE CASH PROCEEDS OF THE SALE OF SUCH EXCESS SHARES OF HOST
REIT COMMON STOCK BY THE TRUSTEE OF THE TRUST. THEREAFTER, ANY PERSON WHO
ACQUIRES HOST REIT COMMON STOCK IN EXCESS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT WILL NOT
RECEIVE ANY PROCEEDS FROM THE SUBSEQUENT SALE THEREOF IN EXCESS OF THE LESSER
OF THE PRICE PAID THEREFOR OR THE AMOUNT REALIZED FROM SUCH SALE. A TRANSFER OF
HOST REIT COMMON STOCK TO A PERSON WHO, AS A RESULT OF THE TRANSFER, VIOLATES
THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT MAY BE VOID UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES, AND, IN ANY EVENT,
WOULD DENY THE TRANSFEREE ANY OF THE ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF OWNING SHARES OF HOST
REIT COMMON STOCK IN EXCESS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT. TO AVOID THE ADVERSE
EFFECTS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT, ANY HOLDER OF HOST COMMON STOCK WHO WOULD OWN
SHARES IN EXCESS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT AS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT EFFECTIVE
TIME SHOULD DISPOSE OF ANY SUCH EXCESS SHARES PRIOR THERETO. See "Description
of Host REIT Capital Stock--Restrictions on Ownership and Transfer."
 
  As a consequence of the Merger, among other things, the assets of Host will
become assets of Host REIT without further action, and Host REIT will become
liable for all the debts and obligations of Host. As soon as practicable
following the Merger, Host REIT will complete any other transactions comprising
the REIT Conversion that have not already been completed. See "The REIT
Conversion."
 
  Following the Merger, each person who was a director of Host will continue as
a director of Host REIT, certain of the officers of Host will remain officers
of Host REIT (others will have become officers of Crestline in connection the
distribution of Crestline shares as part of the Initial E&P Distribution) and
the stockholders of Host REIT will be governed by the Host REIT Charter
attached to the Agreement as Exhibit A and the Host REIT Bylaws attached to the
Agreement as Exhibit B. See "The Restructuring Transactions--Comparison of
Rights of Stockholders of Host and Host REIT."
 
                                       17

<PAGE>
 
 
  The Agreement has been adopted by the Board of Directors of Host, subject to
stockholder approval. The Merger will become effective at the time the Articles
of Merger are accepted for filing (or later if so specified in the Articles of
Merger) by the State Department of Assessments and Taxation of Maryland (the
"SDAT") in accordance with the MGCL and in compliance with the DGCL (the
"Effective Time"). It is expected that the listing of Host REIT Common Stock on
the NYSE will occur at or prior to the Effective Time and that the listing of
Host Common Stock on the NYSE will be terminated at the Effective Time.
 
  Host anticipates that the Merger will become effective as promptly as
practicable following stockholder approval of the Agreement at the Special
Meeting and the satisfaction or waiver of the other conditions to the Merger.
The Agreement provides that the Merger may be abandoned by Host or Host REIT at
any time prior to its effectiveness. However, Host has no current intention of
abandoning or causing Host REIT to abandon the Merger subsequent to the Special
Meeting if stockholder approval is obtained and the other conditions to the
Merger are satisfied or waived. See "The Restructuring Transactions--Conditions
to the Restructuring Transactions."
 
  If the Agreement is approved by Host's stockholders and the Merger is
consummated, the rights and obligations of Host under the Host Marriott
Corporation 1997 Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan, the Host Marriott
Corporation Employee Stock Purchase Plan, the Host Marriott Corporation
Retirement and Savings Plan and the Host Marriott Corporation Executive
Deferred Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors (collectively, the
"Plans") and related and other option agreements will be assumed by Host REIT
in accordance with the Employee Benefits and Other Employee Benefits Allocation
Agreement between Host, the Operating Partnership and Crestline to be executed
in connection with the REIT Conversion (the "1998 Employee Benefits Allocation
Agreement)." See "The Restructuring Transactions--Terms of the Merger,"
"Description of Host REIT Capital Stock" and "Management--1998 Employee
Benefits Allocation Agreement."
 
  Neither Host nor Host REIT is aware of any federal, state or local regulatory
requirements that must be complied with or approvals that must be obtained
prior to consummation of the Merger pursuant to the Agreement, other than
compliance with applicable federal and state securities laws, and the filing of
the Articles of Merger as required under the MGCL and in compliance with the
DGCL and various state and local governmental authorizations. See "The
Restructuring Transactions--Terms of the Merger."
 
  Conditions to the Restructuring Transactions. Consummation of the
Restructuring Transactions is subject to the satisfaction or waiver of various
conditions, including: (i) approval of the Agreement by the stockholders of
Host; (ii) determination by the Host Board of Directors that the transactions
constituting the REIT Conversion which impact Host REIT's status as a REIT for
federal income tax purposes have occurred or are reasonably likely to occur,
and that Host REIT can elect to be treated as a REIT for federal income tax
purposes effective no later than the first full taxable year commencing after
the REIT Conversion is completed; (iii) approval of the Host REIT Common Stock
for listing on the NYSE; (iv) the receipt of all governmental and third-party
consents to the Restructuring Transactions except for consents as would not
reasonably be expected to have a material adverse effect on the business,
financial condition or results of operations of Host REIT, the Operating
Partnership and their subsidiaries taken as a whole; and (v) the United States
Congress shall not have proposed or enacted adverse tax legislation. See "The
Restructuring Transactions--Conditions to the Restructuring Transactions."
 
  Comparison of Rights of Stockholders of Host and Stockholders of Host
REIT. The rights of stockholders of Host are currently governed by the DGCL,
the Host Certificate, the Amended Bylaws of Host (the "Host Bylaws") and the
Host Rights Agreement. If the Agreement is approved by Host's stockholders and
the Merger is consummated, Host REIT will be the surviving entity in the Merger
and the rights of the stockholders of Host REIT will be governed by the MGCL,
the Host REIT Charter, the Host REIT Bylaws and the Host REIT Rights Agreement.
Certain important differences exist between the rights of stockholders of Host
and the rights of stockholders of Host REIT. See "The Restructuring
Transactions--Comparison of Rights of Stockholders of
 
                                       18

<PAGE>
 
Host and Host REIT." Copies of the Host REIT Charter and Host REIT Bylaws are
attached to the Agreement (which is attached to this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus) as Exhibits A and B, respectively.
 
  Limitation of Liability and Indemnification of Directors and Officers. The
Host REIT Charter and Host REIT Bylaws contain provisions limiting the
liability of Host REIT's present and former directors and officers to the
corporation and its stockholders and obligating Host REIT to indemnify present
and former directors and officers all in accordance with Maryland law. See "The
Restructuring Transactions--Limitation of Liability and Indemnification of
Directors and Officers."
 
THE REIT CONVERSION
 
  The transactions summarized below, together with the Restructuring
Transactions, constitute the transactions pursuant to which Host will
restructure its business so that it will qualify as a REIT. If the required
approvals for the various transactions are obtained and other conditions to the
different steps in the REIT Conversion are satisfied or waived, these
transactions are expected to occur at various times prior to the end of 1998
(or as soon thereafter as practicable). Although the Restructuring Transactions
are expected to occur at the final stages of the REIT Conversion, certain of
the REIT Conversion transactions (such as the Partnership Mergers, the Private
Partnership Transactions and the Blackstone Acquisition) may occur following
the Restructuring Transactions to the extent they are consummated.
 
  The Initial E&P Distribution. In order to qualify as a REIT for federal
income tax purposes, among other things, Host REIT and/or Host, as its
predecessor, must have distributed all of the accumulated E&P of Host to their
stockholders in one or more taxable dividends prior to the end of the first
full taxable year for which the REIT election of Host is effective, which
currently is expected to be the taxable year commencing January 1, 1999.
 
  In an effort to help accomplish the requisite distributions of the
accumulated E&P of Host, Host or Host REIT will make the Initial E&P
Distribution, consisting of one or more taxable distributions to their
stockholders in connection with the REIT Conversion consisting of shares of
common stock of Crestline and cash or other consideration in an amount to be
determined. Although there is no assurance that such other consideration
comprising the Initial E&P Distribution will take this form, it is currently
contemplated that such other consideration will consist of either a specified
dollar amount of cash or a specified fraction of a share of Host Common Stock
(or a share of Host REIT Common Stock if the Merger has occurred), as elected
by the Host stockholders (with the non-transferable rights to make such
election referred to as the "Election Rights"). Pursuant to the Election
Rights, recipients of the Election Rights would be entitled to elect between
the cash and Host REIT Common Stock alternative during the approximately 20
business day period after the record date for the Election Rights distribution
and such elections would be irrevocable. In such event, the cash/stock election
would be made by a recipient on a per-share basis so that an Election Rights
recipient could elect to receive cash for a portion of such recipient's shares
held on the record date and Host Common Stock (or Host REIT Common Stock if the
Merger has occurred) for the remaining portion. To the extent that a Host
stockholder does not make a timely election, the Election Rights would provide
that Host stockholders would receive shares of Host Common Stock (or Host REIT
Common Stock if the Merger has occurred), subject to the Ownership Limit. The
cash would be paid or Host REIT shares would be issued promptly after the end
of the election period. In connection with such Election Rights, cash would be
paid in lieu of fractional shares.
 
  The aggregate value of the Crestline common stock and the cash or other
consideration to be distributed to Host stockholders (and the Blackstone
Entities) in connection with the Initial E&P Distribution is currently
estimated to be approximately $525 million to $625 million (approximately $2.10
to $2.50 per share to the Host stockholders). The actual amount of the Initial
E&P Distribution will be based in part upon the estimated amount of accumulated
E&P of Host as of the last day of its taxable year ending on or immediately
following completion of the REIT Conversion. To the extent that the Initial E&P
Distribution is not sufficient to eliminate Host's
 
                                       19

<PAGE>
 
accumulated E&P, Host REIT will make one or more additional taxable
distributions to its stockholders (in the form of cash or securities) prior to
the last day of Host REIT's first full taxable year as a REIT (currently
expected to be December 31, 1999) in an amount intended to be sufficient to
eliminate such E&P, and the Operating Partnership will make corresponding
distributions to all holders of OP Units (including Host REIT) in an amount
sufficient to permit Host REIT to make such additional distributions.
 
  Limited Partners who elect to receive Host REIT Common Stock in exchange for
OP Units in connection with the Partnership Mergers will not receive the
Crestline common stock or any other portion of the Initial E&P Distribution,
which will have been distributed before they become stockholders of Host REIT
(approximately 25 trading days after the effective date of the Partnership
Mergers). No holder of Host REIT Common Stock will be required to pay any cash
or other consideration to Host REIT for shares of Crestline common stock
received in the Initial E&P Distribution or to surrender or exchange their Host
REIT Common Stock in order to receive shares of Crestline common stock or other
cash or securities as part of the Initial E&P Distribution. See "The REIT
Conversion--The Initial E&P Distribution."
 
  In addition, following the Restructuring Transactions, the Blackstone
Entities are entitled to receive a pro rata portion of the same consideration
received by Host REIT's stockholders in connection with the Initial E&P
Distribution, except to the extent the Blackstone Entities elected to receive
additional OP Units in lieu thereof pursuant to the terms of the Blackstone
Acquisition. The payment to the Blackstone Entities of Crestline shares and
other consideration is expected to be approximately $90 to $110 million of the
aggregate Initial E&P Distribution of approximately $525 to $625 million if the
REIT Conversion and the Blackstone Acquisition are consummated. See "Business
and Properties--Blackstone Acquisition." Following the Initial E&P
Distribution, Crestline's principal assets will include the senior living
assets of Host, which are expected to consist of 31 senior living communities,
a 25% interest in the Swissotel management company acquired from the Blackstone
Entities and the Lessees. The shares of Crestline common stock distributed to
Host REIT stockholders as part of the Initial E&P Distribution and the
Blackstone Entities will become a separately traded security from the Host REIT
Common Stock, and Crestline will operate independently from Host REIT. There
will be substantial overlap of stockholders of Crestline and Host REIT
initially, but this overlap likely will diverge over time.
 
  Other Transactions Comprising the REIT Conversion. In addition to the
Restructuring Transactions and the Initial E&P Distribution, the REIT
Conversion includes the following additional transactions:
 
  . Debt Refinancing. In August 1998, Host refinanced $1.55 billion of
    outstanding public bonds (the "Bond Refinancing") through offers to
    purchase such debt securities for cash and a concurrent solicitation of
    consents to amend the terms of the debt securities to facilitate the
    transactions constituting the REIT Conversion. Host obtained the funds
    for the Bond Refinancing primarily from the issuance of new debt
    securities and a new $1.25 billion credit facility (the "New Credit
    Facility"). See "Business and Properties--Indebtedness."
 
  . Treatment of Convertible Preferred Securities. In the REIT Conversion,
    the Operating Partnership will assume primary liability for repayment of
    the $567 million of convertible subordinated debentures of Host
    underlying the $550 million of outstanding Quarterly Income Preferred
    Securities of Host (the "Convertible Preferred Securities"). As the
    successor to Host, Host REIT also will be liable on the debentures and
    the debentures will become convertible into Host REIT Common Stock, but
    the Operating Partnership will have primary responsibility for payment of
    the debentures, including all costs of conversion. Upon conversion by a
    Convertible Preferred Securities holder, the Operating Partnership will
    acquire Host REIT Common Stock from Host REIT in exchange for an equal
    number of OP Units and distribute the Host REIT Common Stock to the
    Convertible Preferred Securities holder. As a result of the distribution
    of Crestline common stock and any cash and other consideration to Host or
    Host REIT stockholders in connection with the Initial E&P Distribution,
    the conversion ratio of the Convertible Preferred Securities will be
    adjusted to take into account certain effects of the REIT Conversion. See
    "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results
    of Operations--Liquidity and Capital Resources."
 
                                       20

<PAGE>
 
 
  . The Partnership Mergers. Immediately following the Effective Date, each
    Partnership that participates in the Partnership Mergers will merge with
    a subsidiary of the Operating Partnership. Such participating
    Partnerships will be the surviving entities of the Partnership Mergers
    and will continue in existence as indirect subsidiaries of the Operating
    Partnership. In the Partnership Mergers, each Limited Partner will
    receive a number of OP Units with a deemed value equal to the stated
    exchange value of his respective partnership interest. If a Limited
    Partner elects to receive Host REIT Common Stock or a Note in exchange
    for OP Units in connection with the Partnership Mergers, such Limited
    Partner will, upon receipt of his OP Units, tender (or be deemed to
    tender) such OP Units to Host REIT in exchange for an equal number of
    shares of Host REIT Common Stock or to the Operating Partnership in
    exchange for a Note with a specified principal amount. If a Limited
    Partner elects to tender his OP Units for Host REIT Common Stock or
    Notes, such Limited Partner must tender all of the OP Units he receives
    in the Partnership Mergers. The general partners of the Partnerships and
    other subsidiaries of Host will also receive OP Units in exchange for
    their interests in the Partnerships, and such general partners will
    continue as wholly-owned, direct or indirect subsidiaries of Host REIT.
    Partnerships that do not participate in a Partnership Merger will
    continue as separate partnerships, but the Operating Partnership would
    contribute some or all of the interests in certain of these Partnerships
    that it receives from Host and its subsidiaries to a Non-Controlled
    Subsidiary.
 
  . Restructuring of the Private Partnerships. The Operating Partnership will
    acquire the partnership interests from unaffiliated partners of certain
    Private Partnerships in exchange for OP Units and, accordingly, will own
    all of the interests in those Private Partnerships. For the remaining
    Private Partnerships, (i) the Operating Partnership will be a partner in
    the partnership if the unaffiliated partners consent to a lease of the
    partnership's Hotel(s) to a Lessee or (ii) if the requisite consents to
    enter into a lease are not obtained, the Operating Partnership may
    transfer its interest in such partnership to a Non-Controlled Subsidiary.
 
  . The Blackstone Acquisition. Subject to various terms and conditions, the
    Operating Partnership expects to acquire from the Blackstone Entities
    ownership of, or controlling interests in, the Blackstone Hotels. In
    addition, Host REIT will acquire a 25% interest in the Swissotel management
    company from the Blackstone Entities, which Host REIT will transfer to
    Crestline. If the Blackstone Acquisition is consummated, the Operating
    Partnership expects to issue approximately 43.7 million OP Units (based
    upon a negotiated value of $20.00 per OP Unit), assume debt and make cash
    payments totaling approximately $862 million and distribute up to 18% of
    the shares of Crestline common stock and other consideration to the
    Blackstone Entities. See "The REIT Conversion--Other Transactions
    Comprising the REIT Conversion--The Blackstone Acquisition."
 
  . Contribution of Assets to Non-Controlled Subsidiaries. The Operating
    Partnership will organize the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries to hold various
    assets (not exceeding, in the aggregate, 20% by value of the assets of
    the Operating Partnership) contributed by Host and its subsidiaries to
    the Operating Partnership. The direct ownership of most of these assets
    by the Operating Partnership could jeopardize Host REIT's status as a
    REIT. These assets primarily will consist of partnership or other
    interests in hotels which are not leased, certain furniture, fixtures and
    equipment ("FF&E") used in the Hotels and certain international hotels in
    which Host owns interests. In exchange for the contribution of these
    assets to the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries, the Operating Partnership will
    receive nonvoting common stock representing 95% of the total economic
    interests of the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries. In addition, the Operating
    Partnership and, prior to the Partnership Mergers, certain of the
    Partnerships (assuming they participate in the Partnership Mergers) will
    sell to a Non-Controlled Subsidiary an estimated $200 million in value of
    personal property associated with certain Hotels for notes or cash that
    has been contributed or loaned to the Non-Controlled Subsidiary by the
    Operating Partnership, or a combination thereof. The Operating
    Partnership could not lease this personal property to the Lessees without
    potentially jeopardizing Host REIT's qualification as a REIT. The Non-
    Controlled Subsidiary will lease such
 
                                       21

<PAGE>
 
   personal property to the applicable Lessees. The Host Marriott Employee
   Statutory Trust, the beneficiaries of which will be certain employees of
   Host REIT and a designated charity (the "Host Employee Trust"), and
   possibly certain other investors will acquire all of the voting common
   stock representing the remaining 5% of the total economic interests, and
   100% of the control, of each Non-Controlled Subsidiary. See "The REIT
   Conversion--Other Transactions Comprising the REIT Conversion."
 
  . Leases of Hotels. The Operating Partnership, its subsidiaries and its
    controlled partnerships, including the Partnerships participating in the
    Partnership Mergers, will lease virtually all of their Hotels to the
    Lessees pursuant to the Leases. See "Business and Properties--The
    Leases." The leased Hotels will be operated by the Lessees under their
    existing brand names pursuant to their existing long-term Management
    Agreements, which will be assigned to the Lessees for the terms of the
    applicable Leases but under which the Operating Partnership will remain
    obligated. See "Business and Properties--The Management Agreements."
 
                                       22

<PAGE>
 
  Following the REIT Conversion, assuming the Full Participation Scenario, the
organizational structure of Host REIT is expected to be as follows:
 
                           [FLOW CHART APPEARS HERE]
 
(1) Represents Limited Partners and others who retain OP Units and do not elect
    to receive shares of Host REIT Common Stock or Notes; excludes Host and its
    subsidiaries. Percentage ownership in the Operating Partnership assumes all
    Limited Partners in the Partnership Mergers elect to retain OP Units.
(2) Also will include Limited Partners in the Partnership Mergers who elect to
    receive shares of Host REIT Common Stock in exchange for the OP Units
    received in the Partnership Mergers. Immediately following the
    Restructuring Transactions and the distribution by Host or Host REIT of
    Crestline common stock to its stockholders and the Blackstone Entities, the
    stockholders of Crestline will consist of the stockholders of Host REIT
    (other than Limited Partners who elect to receive Host REIT Common Stock in
    connection with the Partnership Mergers) and the Blackstone Entities. The
    common ownership of the two public companies, however, will diverge over
    time.
(3) Percentage ownership in the Operating Partnership assumes no Limited
    Partners elect to receive either Host REIT Common Stock or Notes in
    connection with the Partnership Mergers and that the price per share of
    Host REIT Common Stock is $     , which is the maximum price per OP Unit
    for purposes of the Partnership Mergers.
(4) The Operating Partnership will own all or substantially all of the equity
    interests in the Partnerships participating in the Partnership Mergers,
    certain Private Partnerships and other Host subsidiaries that own Hotels,
    both directly and through other direct or indirect, wholly owned
    subsidiaries of the Operating Partnership or Host REIT. Host will
    contribute its partial equity interests in the Partnerships that do not
    participate in the Partnership Mergers and those Private Partnerships whose
    partners have not elected to exchange their interests for OP Units to the
    Operating Partnership, and the Operating Partnership will either hold such
    partial interests or contribute them to the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries.
 
                                       23

<PAGE>
 
  Ownership Interests in the Operating Partnership Following the Restructuring
Transactions and the Other Transactions Comprising the REIT
Conversion. Following the Restructuring Transactions and the other transactions
comprising the REIT Conversion, the Operating Partnership is expected to be
owned as set forth below:
 
                     OWNERSHIP OF THE OPERATING PARTNERSHIP
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                    PERCENTAGE
   ENTITY                                                           INTEREST(1)
   ------                                                           -----------
   <S>                                                              <C>
   Host REIT.......................................................     76.0%
   Limited Partners of the Partnerships............................      6.7
   Private Partnerships............................................      1.0
   Blackstone Entities.............................................     16.3
                                                                       -----
     TOTAL.........................................................    100.0%
                                                                       =====
</TABLE>

- --------
(1) Assumes that all Partnerships participate in the Partnership Mergers, that
    the Blackstone Acquisition is consummated, that all Limited Partners in the
    Partnership Mergers elect to retain OP Units, and that the price of an OP
    Unit is $      per share, which is the maximum price per share for purposes
    of the Partnership Mergers. The percentage interest of Host REIT will
    increase, and the percentage interest of the Limited Partners will
    decrease, if Limited Partners elect to receive Host REIT Common Stock or
    Notes in exchange for their OP Units in connection with the Partnership
    Mergers.
 
FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSEQUENCES
 
  Federal Income Tax Consequences of the OP Contribution. Section 721 of the
Code provides that no gain or loss is recognized in the case of a contribution
of property to a partnership in exchange for an interest in the partnership.
However, there are a number of potential exceptions to the availability of such
treatment. The application of these exceptions is highly complex and depends
upon a number of factual determinations and other outside events which may or
may not occur, but Host believes that it will not recognize a material amount
of gain in connection with the OP Contribution. See "Federal Income Tax
Consequences--Federal Income Tax Consequences of the OP Contribution."
 
  Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Merger. The Merger is expected to
qualify as a tax-free reorganization within the meaning of Section 368(a) of
the Code. Accordingly, no gain or loss will be recognized by Host or Host REIT
as a result of the Merger. In addition, (i) no gain or loss will be recognized
by holders of shares of Host Common Stock upon the conversion of such shares
into Host REIT Common Stock (except for certain stockholders who are not
considered "U.S. persons" for purposes of the Code and who own (or have owned)
in excess of 5% of Host); (ii) the tax basis of shares of Host REIT Common
Stock received by a former holder of Host Common Stock pursuant to the Merger
in the aggregate will be the same as the holder's adjusted tax basis in the
shares of Host Common Stock being converted in the Merger (subject to any
adjustment resulting from the Initial E&P Distribution); and (iii) the holding
period of shares of Host REIT Common Stock received by a former holder of Host
Common Stock pursuant to the Merger will include the holder's holding period
with respect to the shares of Host Common Stock being converted in the Merger,
assuming that the Host Common Stock was held as a capital asset at the
Effective Time. See "Federal Income Tax Consequences--Federal Income Tax
Consequences of the Merger."
 
  Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Initial E&P Distribution. Generally,
the Initial E&P Distribution will be a taxable dividend to a Host stockholder
to the extent that the Initial E&P Distribution is made out of the Host
stockholder's share of the portion of the current and accumulated E&P of Host
and Host REIT allocable to the Initial E&P Distribution. Host and Host REIT
currently believe that the substantial majority, if not all, of the Initial E&P
Distribution (the fair market value of which Host currently estimates will
range from
 
                                       24

<PAGE>
 
approximately $2.10 to $2.50 per share of Host Common Stock) will be considered
made out of such E&P and, therefore, will be taxable as a dividend. See
"Federal Income Tax Consequences--Federal Income Tax Consequences of the
Initial E&P Distribution."
 
  Qualification of Host REIT as a REIT. Host REIT expects to qualify as a REIT
for federal income tax purposes effective for its first full taxable year
commencing after the REIT Conversion is completed. If it so qualifies, Host
REIT will be permitted to (i) deduct dividends paid to its stockholders,
allowing the income represented by such dividends to avoid taxation at the
entity level and to be taxed only at the stockholder level and (ii) treat
retained net capital gains in a manner so that such gains are taxed at the Host
REIT level but effectively avoid taxation at the stockholder level. Host REIT,
however, will be subject to a separate corporate income tax on any gains
recognized during the ten years following the REIT Conversion that are
attributable to "built-in" gain with respect to the assets that Host owned at
the time of the REIT Conversion (which tax would be paid by the Operating
Partnership). Host REIT has substantial deferred tax liabilities that are
likely to be recognized as "built-in" gain (or by a Non-Controlled Subsidiary)
during such period without any corresponding receipt of cash, and the Operating
Partnership will be responsible for paying such taxes. Host REIT's ability to
qualify as a REIT will depend upon its continuing satisfaction following the
REIT Conversion of various requirements related to the nature of its assets,
the sources of its income and the distributions to its stockholders, including
a requirement that Host REIT distribute to its stockholders at least 95% of its
taxable income each year.
 
RECOMMENDATION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS
 
  FOR THE REASONS STATED HEREIN, THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF HOST RECOMMENDS THAT
HOST'S STOCKHOLDERS VOTE "FOR" APPROVAL OF THE AGREEMENT AND THE TRANSACTIONS
CONTEMPLATED THEREBY.
 
DISTRIBUTIONS AND MARKET PRICES OF HOST COMMON STOCK
 
  Host Common Stock has been listed on the NYSE under the symbol "HMT" since
October 8, 1993. Prior thereto, Host and Marriott International were operated
as a single consolidated company. See "Certain Relationships and Related
Transactions--Relationship Between Host and Marriott International."
 
  The table below sets forth, for the periods indicated, the reported high and
low sale prices of Host Common Stock on the NYSE. On April 15, 1998, the last
full trading day prior to the public announcement of the proposed REIT
Conversion, the closing sale price of Host Common Stock on the NYSE was $20.00
per share. On      , 1998, the latest practicable date before the printing of
this Proxy Statement/Prospectus, the closing sale price of Host Common Stock on
the NYSE was $  per share. Host has not declared any cash dividends on the Host
Common Stock during the two fiscal years ended January 2, 1998 and through the
date hereof.
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                            HIGH      LOW
                                                            ----      ----
   <S>                                                      <C>       <C>
   1997
     First Quarter......................................... $18 3/4   $15 3/4
     Second Quarter........................................  18 1/8    15 1/4
     Third Quarter.........................................  20 13/16  17 1/2
     Fourth Quarter........................................  23 3/4    18 1/16
   1998
     First Quarter......................................... $20 7/16  $17 1/2
     Second Quarter........................................  21 3/8    17 1/8
     Third Quarter.........................................  18 15/16  12 13/16
     Fourth Quarter (through September 28, 1998)...........  14 3/8    13 1/16
</TABLE>

 
  It is expected that, upon consummation of the Merger, the Host REIT Common
Stock will be listed and trade on the NYSE in the same manner as shares of Host
Common Stock currently trade on the NYSE. The
 
                                       25

<PAGE>
 
historical trading prices of Host's Common Stock are not necessarily indicative
of the future trading prices of Host REIT Common Stock. See "Risk Factors--
Current Host Common Stock Price Is Not Necessarily Indicative of the Price of
Host REIT Common Stock Following the REIT Conversion."
 
DISTRIBUTION AND DIVIDEND POLICY AFTER THE MERGER
 
  The Operating Partnership and Host REIT intend to pay regular quarterly
distributions to holders of OP Units and Host REIT Common Stock, respectively.
Host REIT and the Operating Partnership anticipate that distributions will be
paid during January, April, July and October of each year, except that the
first distribution in 1999 is expected to be paid at the end of February if the
REIT Conversion is completed in 1998. The distributions to stockholders per
share of Host REIT Common Stock are expected to be in an amount equal to the
amount distributed by the Operating Partnership per OP Unit. The Operating
Partnership intends to distribute an amount that will enable Host REIT to
distribute to its stockholders for each year an amount equal to 100% of Host
REIT's taxable income (other than capital gains, which will be addressed on a
case-by-case basis). Host REIT anticipates that distributions generally will be
paid from cash available for distribution (generally equal to cash from
operations less capital expenditures and principal amortization on
indebtedness); however, to the extent that cash available for distribution is
insufficient to make such distributions, the Operating Partnership intends to
borrow funds in order to make distributions to holders of OP Units in an amount
sufficient to allow Host REIT to distribute 100% of its taxable income for each
year (within a certain period after the end of such year). Based upon Host's
preliminary estimates of Host REIT's taxable income for the twelve months
ending December 31, 1999, Host and the Operating Partnership currently estimate
that this policy will result in an initial annual distribution by the Operating
Partnership of approximately $0.84 per OP Unit ($0.21 per quarter) during the
twelve months ending December 31, 1999. If distributions were made at this
level ($226 million) but the Operating Partnership's cash available for
distribution were only equal to its estimated pro forma cash available for
distribution of $0.80 per OP Unit during 1999 ($214 million), then the
Operating Partnership would be required to borrow approximately $13 million
(including estimated interest thereon of $1 million) to make such
distributions. While Host does not believe this will be necessary, it believes
that the Operating Partnership would be able to borrow the necessary amounts
under the New Credit Facility or from other sources and that any such borrowing
would not have a material adverse effect on its financial condition or results
of operations. Distributions will be made in the discretion of the Board of
Directors of Host REIT and will be affected by a number of factors, many of
which are beyond the control of Host REIT and the Operating Partnership. In
order to maintain its qualification as a REIT under the Code, Host REIT is
required to distribute (within a certain period after the end of each year) at
least 95% of its REIT taxable income for such year. See "Distribution and Other
Policies--Distribution Policy." Host REIT intends to establish a dividend
reinvestment plan.
 
                                       26

<PAGE>
 
 
UNAUDITED PER SHARE DATA
 
  The following table sets forth selected historical per share data for Host.
The per share data presented below are based on and derived from, and should be
read in conjunction with the historical consolidated statements and the related
notes thereto of Host, which are included in this Proxy Statement/Prospectus.
Interim data for the twenty-four weeks ended June 20, 1997 and June 19, 1998
and as of June 20, 1997 and June 19, 1998 are unaudited, but include, in the
opinion of management of Host, all adjustments (which are normal and recurring)
necessary for a fair presentation of such data. Results for the twenty-four
weeks ended June 19, 1998 are not necessarily indicative of the results that
may be expected for any other interim periods or for the year as a whole.
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                      AS OF AND FOR THE     AS OF AND FOR THE
                                       FISCAL YEAR(1)      FIRST TWO QUARTERS
                                     --------------------  -------------------
                                     1997   1996    1995     1998      1997
                                     ----- ------  ------  --------- ---------
<S>                                  <C>   <C>     <C>     <C>       <C>
Basic income from continuing
 operations......................... $0.23 $(0.07) $(0.39) $    0.47 $    0.16
Diluted income from continuing
 operations......................... $0.23 $(0.07) $(0.39) $    0.45 $    0.16
Cash distributions per share(2).....     0      0       0          0         0
Book value per share................ $5.89 $ 5.58  $ 4.23  $    6.36 $    6.24
</TABLE>

- --------
(1) Host's fiscal year ends on the Friday nearest to December 31. Fiscal years
    1997 and 1995 included 52 weeks compared to 53 weeks for fiscal year 1996.
(2) See "--Distributions and Market Prices of Host Common Stock."
 
SUMMARY FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
  The following table sets forth unaudited pro forma financial and other
information for the Company and Host REIT and combined consolidated historical
financial information for Host. The following summary financial information
should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and notes thereto
and Management's Discussion and Analysis of Results of Operations and Financial
Condition included elsewhere in this Consent Solicitation.
 
  The unaudited pro forma financial statements as of June 19, 1998 and for the
fiscal year ended January 2, 1998 and the twenty-four weeks ended June 19, 1998
("First Two Quarters 1998") are presented as if the REIT Conversion occurred as
of June 19, 1998 for the pro forma balance sheets and at the beginning of each
period presented for the pro forma statements of operations. The pro forma
information incorporates certain assumptions that are described in the Notes to
the Unaudited Pro Forma Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Consent
Solicitation.
 
  The pro forma information does not purport to represent what the Company's or
Host REIT's financial position or results of operations would actually have
been if these transactions had, in fact, occurred on such date or at the
beginning of the period indicated, or to project the Company's or Host REIT's
financial position or results of operations at any future date or for any
future period.
 
  In addition, the historical information contained in the following table is
not comparable to the operations of the Company or Host REIT on a going-forward
basis because the historical information relates to an operating entity which
owns and operates hotels and senior living communities, while the Company will
own the Hotels but will lease them to the Lessees and receive rental payments
in connection therewith.
 
                                       27

<PAGE>
 
                         SUMMARY FINANCIAL INFORMATION
                                 (IN MILLIONS)
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                          COMPANY PRO FORMA          HOST REIT PRO FORMA                     COMPANY PRO FORMA
                     --------------------------- ---------------------------    HOST    ---------------------------
                          FISCAL YEAR 1997            FISCAL YEAR 1997       HISTORICAL   FIRST TWO QUARTERS 1998
                     --------------------------- --------------------------- ---------- ---------------------------
                         100%          100%          100%          100%                     100%          100%
                     PARTICIPATION PARTICIPATION PARTICIPATION PARTICIPATION            PARTICIPATION PARTICIPATION
                        WITH NO     WITH NOTES      WITH NO     WITH NOTES     FISCAL      WITH NO     WITH NOTES
                     NOTES ISSUED    ISSUED(1)   NOTES ISSUED    ISSUED(1)   YEAR 1997  NOTES ISSUED    ISSUED(1)
                     ------------- ------------- ------------- ------------- ---------- ------------- -------------
<S>                  <C>           <C>           <C>           <C>           <C>        <C>           <C>
REVENUES:
 Hotel revenues....     $   --        $   --        $   --        $   --       $1,093       $  --         $  --
 Rental revenues...      1,170         1,170         1,170         1,170           --         396           396
 Other revenues....          1             1             1             1           54           3             3
                        ------        ------        ------        ------       ------       -----         -----
   Total revenues..      1,171         1,171         1,171         1,171        1,147         399           399
                        ------        ------        ------        ------       ------       -----         -----
OPERATING COSTS AND
EXPENSES:
 Hotel.............        639           637           639           637          649         294           293
 Other.............         11            11            11            11           49           5             5
                        ------        ------        ------        ------       ------       -----         -----
   Total operating
   costs and
   expenses........        650           648           650           648          698         299           298
                        ------        ------        ------        ------       ------       -----         -----
Operating profit...        521           523           521           523          449         100           101
Minority interest..        (10)          (10)          (16)          (12)         (32)        (11)          (11)
Corporate
expenses...........        (44)          (44)          (44)          (44)         (47)        (20)          (20)
REIT Conversion
expenses...........         --            --            --            --           --          --            --
Interest expense...       (468)         (485)         (430)         (447)        (302)       (216)         (224)
Dividends on
Convertible
Preferred
Securities.........         --            --           (37)          (37)         (37)         --            --
Interest income....         27            27            27            27           52          13            13
                        ------        ------        ------        ------       ------       -----         -----
Income (loss)
before income
taxes..............         26            11            21            10           83        (134)         (141)
Benefit (provision)
for income taxes...         (1)           (1)           (1)           (1)         (36)          7             7
                        ------        ------        ------        ------       ------       -----         -----
Income (loss)
before
extraordinary items
 ...................     $   25        $   10        $   20        $    9       $   47       $(127)        $(134)
                        ======        ======        ======        ======       ======       =====         =====
<CAPTION>
                         HOST REIT PRO FORMA
                     ---------------------------    HOST
                       FIRST TWO QUARTERS 1998   HISTORICAL
                     --------------------------- ----------
                         100%          100%
                     PARTICIPATION PARTICIPATION FIRST TWO
                        WITH NO     WITH NOTES    QUARTERS
                     NOTES ISSUED    ISSUED(1)      1998
                     ------------- ------------- ----------
<S>                  <C>           <C>           <C>
REVENUES:
 Hotel revenues....      $ --          $  --        $652
 Rental revenues...       396            396          --
 Other revenues....         3              3          95
                     ------------- ------------- ----------
   Total revenues..       399            399         747
                     ------------- ------------- ----------
OPERATING COSTS AND
EXPENSES:
 Hotel.............       294            293         343
 Other.............         5              5          30
                     ------------- ------------- ----------
   Total operating
   costs and
   expenses........       299            298         373
                     ------------- ------------- ----------
Operating profit...       100            101         374
Minority interest..        21             14         (30)
Corporate
expenses...........       (20)           (20)        (21)
REIT Conversion
expenses...........        --             --          (6)
Interest expense...      (198)          (206)       (162)
Dividends on
Convertible
Preferred
Securities.........       (17)           (17)        (17)
Interest income....        13             13          25
                     ------------- ------------- ----------
Income (loss)
before income
taxes..............      (101)          (115)        163
Benefit (provision)
for income taxes...         5              6         (67)
                     ------------- ------------- ----------
Income (loss)
before
extraordinary items
 ...................      $(96)         $(109)       $ 96
                     ============= ============= ==========
</TABLE>

 
                                        AS OF JUNE 19, 1998
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                   COMPANY PRO FORMA                    HOST REIT PRO FORMA
                         ------------------------------------- -------------------------------------
                         100% PARTICIPATION 100% PARTICIPATION 100% PARTICIPATION 100% PARTICIPATION
                           WITH NO NOTES        WITH NOTES       WITH NO NOTES        WITH NOTES        HOST
                               ISSUED           ISSUED(1)            ISSUED           ISSUED(1)      HISTORICAL
                         ------------------ ------------------ ------------------ ------------------ ----------
<S>                      <C>                <C>                <C>                <C>                <C>
BALANCE SHEET DATA:
 Property and equipment,
 net....................       $7,047             $7,006             $7,047             $7,006         $5,698
 Total assets...........        8,103              8,063              8,103              8,063          6,765
 Debt, excluding
 convertible debt.......        5,025              5,273              5,025              5,273          3,784
 Convertible debt ......          567                567                 --                 --             --
 Total liabilities......        6,670              6,918              6,092              6,340          4,917
 Convertible Preferred
 Securities.............           --                 --                550                550            550
 Limited Partner
 interests of third
 parties at redemption
 value..................        1,010                722                 --                 --             --
 Equity.................          423                423              1,087                947          1,298
</TABLE>

- -----
(1)  Assumes that all the Limited Partners of each Partnership elect to
     exchange their OP Units for Notes.
 
                                       28

<PAGE>
 
                                 RISK FACTORS
 
  In considering whether to approve the Agreement and the transactions
contemplated thereby, stockholders of Host should consider carefully, among
other factors, the material risks described below.
 
RISKS AND EFFECTS OF THE MERGER AND THE REIT CONVERSION
 
  LACK OF CONTROL OVER HOTEL OPERATIONS. Due to current federal income tax law
restrictions on a REIT's ability to derive revenues directly from the
operation of a hotel, Host REIT will lease virtually all of its consolidated
Hotels to the Lessees, which will operate the Hotels by continuing to retain
the Managers pursuant to the Management Agreements. Host REIT will not operate
the Hotels or participate in the decisions affecting the daily operations of
the Hotels. Host REIT will have only limited ability to require the Lessees or
the Managers to operate or manage the Hotels in any particular manner and no
ability to govern any particular aspect of their day-to-day operation or
management. Even if Host REIT's management believes the Lessees or the
Managers are operating or managing the Hotels inefficiently or in a manner
that does not result in the maximization of rental payments to Host REIT under
the Leases, Host REIT has only a limited ability to require the Lessees or the
Managers to change their method of operation or management. Therefore, Host
REIT will be dependent for its revenue upon the ability of the Lessees and the
Managers to operate and manage the Hotels. Host REIT is limited to seeking
redress only if the Lessees violate the terms of the Leases and then only to
the extent of the remedies set forth therein. Remedies under the Leases
include Host REIT's ability to terminate a Lease upon certain events of
default, such as the Lessee's failure to pay rent or failure to maintain
certain net worth requirements and breaches of other specified obligations
under the Leases. See "Business and Properties--The Leases." Termination of a
Lease, however, could impair Host REIT's ability to qualify as a REIT for
federal income tax purposes unless another suitable lessee could be found.
 
  LACK OF CONTROL OVER NON-CONTROLLED SUBSIDIARIES. The Non-Controlled
Subsidiaries will hold various assets (not exceeding in the aggregate 20% by
value of the assets of Host REIT), consisting primarily of interests in hotels
which are not leased, certain FF&E used in the Hotels and certain
international hotels. The direct ownership or control of most of these assets
by Host REIT could jeopardize Host REIT's status as a REIT. Although Host REIT
will own 95% of the total economic interests of the Non-Controlled
Subsidiaries, the Host Employee Trust and possibly certain other investors
will own all of the voting common stock of the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries
(which will represent the remaining 5% of the total economic interest
thereof). As the owner of the voting stock of the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries,
the Host Employee Trust and possibly certain other investors will select the
directors of the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries, who will be responsible for
overseeing the operations of those entities. As a result, Host REIT will have
no control over the operation or management of the hotels or other assets
owned by the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries even though it will depend upon the
Non-Controlled Subsidiaries for a significant portion of its revenues (and the
activities of the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries could cause Host REIT to be in
default under its principal debt facilities).
 
  DEPENDENCE UPON CRESTLINE. Crestline and its subsidiaries will be the
Lessees of substantially all of the Hotels and their rent payments will be the
primary source of Host REIT's revenues. Crestline's financial condition and
ability to meet its obligations under the Leases will determine Host REIT's
ability to make distributions to holders of OP Units, including Host REIT, and
Host REIT's ability, in turn, to make distributions to its stockholders. As of
June 19, 1998, on a pro forma basis, after giving effect to the REIT
Conversion, Crestline would have had approximately $315 million of
indebtedness (including $100 million due to Host REIT to pay for hotel working
capital purchased from Host REIT but not including guarantees of obligations
of Crestline's subsidiaries under the Leases and the Management Agreements)
and Crestline can incur additional indebtedness in the future. There can be no
assurance that Crestline will have sufficient assets, income and access to
financing to enable it to satisfy its obligations under the Leases. In
addition, the credit rating of Host REIT will be affected by the general
creditworthiness of Crestline.
 
                                      29

<PAGE>
 
  CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
 
    RESPONSIBILITIES OF HOST REIT TO OTHER LIMITED PARTNERS IN THE OPERATING
  PARTNERSHIP. After the REIT Conversion, Host REIT, as the sole general
  partner of the Operating Partnership, will have fiduciary obligations to
  the limited partners in the Operating Partnership, and the discharge of
  such obligations may result in decisions that do not fully reflect the
  interests of Host REIT's stockholders.
 
    RELATIONSHIPS WITH MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL AND CRESTLINE. Marriott
  International currently serves as manager for all but 16 of Host's Hotels,
  and will continue to manage those Hotels pursuant to the Management
  Agreements that will be assigned to the Lessees. In addition, Marriott
  International acts as manager of hotels that will compete with Host REIT's
  Hotels. As a result, Marriott International may make decisions regarding
  competing lodging facilities which it manages that would not necessarily be
  in the best interests of Host REIT or the Lessees. Further, J.W. Marriott,
  Jr. and Richard E. Marriott, who are brothers, currently serve as directors
  of Host and directors (and, in the case of J.W. Marriott, Jr., also an
  officer) of Marriott International. After the REIT Conversion, J.W.
  Marriott, Jr. will serve as a director of Host REIT and will continue to
  serve as a director of Marriott International, and Richard E. Marriott will
  serve as Chairman of the Board of Host REIT and continue to serve as a
  director of Marriott International. J.W. Marriott, Jr. and Richard E.
  Marriott also beneficially own approximately % and  %, respectively, of the
  outstanding shares of common stock of Marriott International, and will
  beneficially own  % and  %, respectively, of the outstanding shares of
  common stock of Crestline (but neither will serve as an officer or director
  thereof). As a result, J.W. Marriott, Jr. and Richard E. Marriott may have
  a potential conflict of interest with respect to their obligations as
  directors of Host REIT in connection with any decisions regarding Marriott
  International itself (including decisions relating to the Management
  Agreements involving the Hotels), Marriott International's management of
  competing lodging properties and Crestline's leasing and other businesses
  that would not necessarily be in the best interests of Host REIT.
 
  CURRENT HOST COMMON STOCK PRICE IS NOT NECESSARILY INDICATIVE OF THE PRICE
OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK FOLLOWING THE REIT CONVERSION. Host's current stock
price is not necessarily indicative of how the market will value Host REIT
Common Stock following the REIT Conversion, because of the effect of the
distribution of Crestline common stock and cash or other consideration in
connection with the Initial E&P Distribution, the acquisition of additional
assets in connection with the REIT Conversion, including the Blackstone
Acquisition, and the change in Host's organization from a taxable corporation
to a REIT. The current stock price of Host reflects the current market
valuation of Host's current business and assets (including the Crestline
common stock and the cash or other consideration that may be distributed in
connection with the Initial E&P Distribution), a significant portion of which
(except for the Crestline common stock and cash or other consideration to be
distributed and certain other de minimis assets) will be contributed to the
Operating Partnership and will comprise the core of Host REIT's business and
assets following the REIT Conversion. Host's current stock price also is
affected by general market conditions.
 
  CASH DISTRIBUTIONS MAY EXCEED CASH AVAILABLE FOR DISTRIBUTION. Distributions
will be made at the discretion of Host REIT's Board of Directors and will be
affected by a number of factors, including the rental payments received by the
Operating Partnership from the Lessees with respect to the Leases of the
Hotels, the operating expenses of the Operating Partnership, the level of
borrowings and interest expense incurred in borrowing, the Operating
Partnership's financial condition and cash available for distribution, the
taxable income of Host REIT and the Operating Partnership, the effects of
acquisitions and dispositions of assets, unanticipated capital expenditures
and distributions required to be made on any preferred units issued by the
Operating Partnership. To the extent that cash available for distribution
(generally cash from operations less capital expenditures and principal
amortization of indebtedness) is insufficient to pay distributions in
accordance with the Operating Partnership's distribution policy or to maintain
the REIT qualification of Host REIT, the Operating Partnership intends to
borrow to make such distributions. The preliminary estimated initial annual
cash distributions of the Operating Partnership during the twelve months
ending December 31, 1999 ($226 million) will exceed its estimated pro forma
cash available for distribution during the twelve months ending December 31,
 
                                      30

<PAGE>
 
1999 ($214 million), which would require borrowings of approximately $13
million (including interest thereon of $1 million) to make such distributions
in accordance with the Operating Partnership's distribution policy. Actual
results may vary substantially from the estimates and no assurance can be
given that the Operating Partnership's estimates will prove accurate or that
any level of distributions will be made or sustained.
 
  TIMING OF THE RESTRUCTURING TRANSACTIONS AND THE REIT CONVERSION. If the
Restructuring Transactions and the other transactions comprising the REIT
Conversion do not occur in time for Host REIT to elect REIT status effective
January 1, 1999, the effectiveness of Host REIT's election could be delayed to
January 1, 2000, which would result in Host or Host REIT continuing to pay
substantial corporate-level income taxes in 1999 and could cause the
Blackstone Acquisition not to be consummated.
 
  UNCERTAINTIES AT THE TIME OF VOTING ON THE AGREEMENT. There are several
uncertainties relating to the REIT Conversion, including the uncertainties
described below, that will exist at the time Host stockholders vote on the
Agreement. The results of the Partnership Mergers, including whether all or
less than all of the Partnerships voted to participate in the Partnership
Mergers, will not be known at the time Host stockholders vote on the
Agreement. The benefits to Host of the REIT Conversion will be markedly
reduced if one or more of the Partnerships do not participate in the
Partnership Mergers. In addition, the price of an OP Unit for purposes of the
Partnership Mergers will be equal to the average closing price on the NYSE of
a share of Host REIT Common Stock for the first 20 trading days after the
effective date of the Partnership Mergers (but in no event will it be less
than $   or greater than $   per OP Unit). Because the value of the OP Units
issued to the Limited Partners in the Partnership Mergers will not be
determined until after the Partnership Mergers, stockholders cannot know at
the time they vote on the Agreement (a) the value of the OP Units to be issued
to the Limited Partners, which value could be higher or lower than the value
of Host REIT Common Stock at the time of the Merger, and (b) the percentage
interest in the Operating Partnership that such OP Units represent, which
affects the allocation of distributions from the Operating Partnership to Host
REIT and the Limited Partners. Moreover, because the Limited Partners can
tender the OP Units they receive in the Partnership Mergers to Host REIT in
exchange for an equal number of shares of Host REIT Common Stock, which Host
REIT Common Stock will be issued promptly following the 20th trading day after
the effective date of the Partnership Mergers, or to the Operating Partnership
for Notes, Host stockholders cannot know the exact number of Notes or shares
of Host REIT Common Stock that may be issued in connection with the
Partnership Mergers or the extent of the dilutive effect on Host REIT
stockholders from the issuance of additional shares of Host REIT Common Stock
to the Limited Partners. In addition, the assets and liabilities of the Non-
Controlled Subsidiaries will not be known at the time stockholders vote on the
Agreement. Although the Restructuring Transactions may be consummated with the
expectation that certain other transactions comprising the REIT Conversion,
such as the Private Partnership Transactions and the Blackstone Acquisition,
will occur, there is no assurance that such will be the case. There is no
assurance as to the outcome of such matters, and if certain of these
transactions or events are not consummated as expected, the value of Host REIT
Common Stock and the amount of cash available for distribution to stockholders
could be adversely affected, and Host REIT could fail to qualify as a REIT for
federal income tax purposes.
 
  INABILITY TO OBTAIN THIRD-PARTY CONSENTS. There are numerous third-party
consents which are required to be obtained in order to consummate the
Restructuring Transactions and the other transactions comprising the REIT
Conversion. These include consents of many hotel project lenders, ground
lessors, joint venture partners, Marriott International and others. The
inability of Host, the Operating Partnership or Host REIT to obtain one or
more consents could cause a default under cross-default provisions of the
Company's principal credit facilities. Although Host will not consummate the
Restructuring Transactions or the REIT Conversion unless it believes that the
inability of Host, the Operating Partnership or Host REIT to obtain one or
more consents would not reasonably be expected to have a material adverse
effect on the Company's business, financial condition or results of
operations, there can be no assurance that such a material adverse effect will
not occur, which could reduce the value of Host REIT Common Stock.
 
  EXPIRATION OF THE LEASES AND POSSIBLE INABILITY TO FIND OTHER LESSEES. The
Leases generally will expire seven to ten years after the Effective Date, and
there can be no assurance that the affected Hotels will be relet to the
Lessees (or if relet, will be relet on terms as favorable to Host REIT). If
the Hotels are not relet, Host REIT will be required to find other lessees,
which lessees must meet certain requirements set forth in the
 
                                      31

<PAGE>
 
Management Agreements and the Code. There can be no assurance that
satisfactory lessees could be found or as to the terms and conditions on which
Host REIT would be able to relet the Hotels or enter into new leases with such
lessees, which could result in a failure of Host REIT to qualify as a REIT or
in reduced cash available for distribution.
 
  LEASES COULD IMPAIR THE SALE OR OTHER DISPOSITION OF HOST REIT'S
HOTELS. Each Lease generally provides for a termination payment if the Lease
is terminated by Host REIT prior to the expiration of the term of such Lease
(including due to a change in the federal income tax laws that allows Host
REIT to operate the Hotels without jeopardizing Host REIT's status as a REIT),
except following a default by a Lessee and in certain other circumstances
(including in connection with the sale of up to 12 Hotels without a
termination payment) or unless Host REIT leases to the Lessee a comparable
substitute hotel. The termination fee is equal to the fair market value of the
Lessee's leasehold interest in the remaining term of the Lease. The payment of
such termination fee under the Leases could have the effect of impairing the
ability of Host REIT to sell its Hotels if market conditions otherwise warrant
such a sale and would reduce the net proceeds of any such sale. See "Business
and Properties--The Leases--Termination of Leases upon Disposition of Hotels."
 
  LIMITATIONS ON SALE OR REFINANCING OF CERTAIN HOTELS. For reasons relating
to federal income tax considerations, the agreements by which the Operating
Partnership will acquire certain Hotels (or obtain consent to lease certain
Hotels to the Lessees) will also restrict the ability of the Operating
Partnership to dispose of or refinance the debt secured by such Hotels for
varying periods from the Effective Date, depending on the Hotel. Similarly,
upon acquiring the Blackstone Hotels, the Operating Partnership will agree not
to dispose of the Blackstone Hotels for ten years (although the Operating
Partnership may dispose of up to 50% of the value of the assets contributed to
the Operating Partnership by the Blackstone Entities commencing after five
years). Thus, even if it were in the best interests of Host REIT to sell such
hotels or refinance the debt secured by any of these Hotels, it may be
difficult or impossible for Host REIT to do so during their respective lock-
out periods.
 
RISKS OF OWNERSHIP OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK
 
  POSSIBLE ADVERSE CONSEQUENCES OF LIMITS ON OWNERSHIP OF HOST REIT COMMON
STOCK. To maintain its qualification as a REIT for federal income tax
purposes, not more than 50% in value of the outstanding shares of capital
stock of Host REIT may be owned, directly or indirectly, by five or fewer
individuals (as defined in the Code to include certain entities). See "Federal
Income Tax Consequences--Federal Income Taxation of Host REIT Following the
Merger--Requirements for Qualification." In addition, a person who owns,
directly or by attribution, 10% or more of an interest in a tenant of Host
REIT (or a tenant of any partnership in which Host REIT is a partner) cannot
own, directly or by attribution, 10% or more of the shares of Host REIT
without jeopardizing Host REIT's qualification as a REIT. Primarily to
facilitate maintenance of its qualification as a REIT for federal income tax
purposes, the Ownership Limit under the Host REIT Charter will prohibit
ownership, directly or by virtue of the attribution provisions of the Code, by
any person or persons acting as a group of more than 9.8% of the issued and
outstanding shares of Host REIT Common Stock and will prohibit ownership,
directly or by virtue of the attribution provisions of the Code, by any person
or persons acting as a group of more than 9.8% of the issued and outstanding
shares of any class or series of Host REIT's preferred stock. The Ownership
Limit will become applicable to all Host REIT stockholders at the Ownership
Limit Effective Time (subject to a limited exception for a holder of shares of
Host REIT Common Stock solely by reason of the Merger so long as the holder
thereof would not own, directly or by attribution under the Code, more than
9.8% in value of the outstanding shares of capital stock of Host REIT, and to
a limitation on the application of the "group" limitation (but not any other
element of the Ownership Limit) to any "group" that otherwise would exceed the
Ownership Limit at the Ownership Limit Effective Time solely by reason of its
status as a "group"). The Board of Directors, in its sole and absolute
discretion, may waive or modify the Ownership Limit with respect to one or
more persons who would not be treated as "individuals" for purposes of the
Code if it is satisfied, based upon information required to be provided by the
party seeking the waiver and upon an opinion of counsel satisfactory to the
Board of Directors, that ownership in excess of this limit will not cause a
person who is an individual to be treated as owning shares in excess of the
Ownership Limit, applying the applicable constructive ownership rules, and
will not otherwise jeopardize Host REIT's status as a REIT for federal income
tax purposes (for example, by causing any tenant of Host REIT or any of the
Partnerships or Private Partnerships (including but not limited to Crestline
 
                                      32

<PAGE>
 
and the Lessees) to be considered a "related party tenant" for purposes of the
REIT qualification rules). The constructive ownership rules are complex and
may cause Host REIT Common Stock owned directly or constructively by a group
of related individuals or entities to be constructively owned by one
individual or entity. As a result, the acquisition of less than 9.8% of the
outstanding shares of Host REIT Common Stock or 9.8% of the outstanding shares
of any class of Host REIT preferred stock (or the acquisition of an interest
in an entity which owns shares of Host REIT's capital stock) by an individual
or entity could cause that individual or entity (or another individual or
entity) to own constructively in excess of 9.8% of the outstanding shares of
Host REIT Common Stock or 9.8% of the outstanding shares of any class of Host
REIT's preferred stock and thus subject such shares to the Ownership Limit.
 
  ANY SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK HELD AS OF, OR ACQUIRED OR HELD AT ANY
TIME AFTER, THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT EFFECTIVE TIME IN VIOLATION OF THE OWNERSHIP
LIMIT WILL BE TRANSFERRED AUTOMATICALLY TO A TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT OF A
DESIGNATED CHARITABLE BENEFICIARY, AND THE PERSON WHO ACQUIRED SUCH EXCESS
SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY DISTRIBUTIONS
THEREON OR TO VOTE SUCH EXCESS SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK. IF EXCESS
SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK ARE HELD AS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT EFFECTIVE
TIME, THE HOLDER OF SUCH EXCESS SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK WILL RECEIVE
THE LESSER OF THE VALUE OF SUCH EXCESS SHARES AS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT
EFFECTIVE TIME OR THE CASH PROCEEDS OF THE SALE OF SUCH EXCESS SHARES OF HOST
REIT COMMON STOCK BY THE TRUSTEE OF THE TRUST. THEREAFTER, ANY PERSON WHO
ACQUIRES HOST REIT COMMON STOCK IN EXCESS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT WILL NOT
RECEIVE ANY PROCEEDS FROM THE SUBSEQUENT SALE THEREOF IN EXCESS OF THE LESSER
OF THE PRICE PAID THEREFOR OR THE AMOUNT REALIZED FROM SUCH SALE. A TRANSFER
OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK TO A PERSON WHO, AS A RESULT OF THE TRANSFER,
VIOLATES THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT MAY BE VOID UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES, AND, IN
ANY EVENT, WOULD DENY THE TRANSFEREE ANY OF THE ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF OWNING
HOST REIT COMMON STOCK IN EXCESS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT. TO AVOID THE ADVERSE
EFFECTS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT, ANY HOLDER OF HOST COMMON STOCK WHO WOULD OWN
SHARES IN EXCESS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT AS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT EFFECTIVE
TIME SHOULD DISPOSE OF ANY SUCH EXCESS SHARES PRIOR THERETO. See "Description
of Host REIT Capital Stock--Restrictions on Ownership and Transfer." The
Ownership Limit may have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a
change in control and, therefore, could adversely affect the stockholders'
ability to realize a premium over the then-prevailing market price for Host
REIT Common Stock in connection with such transaction.
 
  LIMITATIONS ON ACQUISITION OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK AND CHANGE IN
CONTROL. The Host REIT Charter and Host REIT Bylaws, the Partnership
Agreement, the Stockholder Rights Plan (to be adopted by Host REIT to replace
the existing stockholder rights plan under the Host Rights Agreement) and
Maryland law contain a number of provisions that could delay, defer or prevent
a transaction or a change of control of Host REIT that might involve a premium
price for holders of Host REIT Common Stock or otherwise be in their best
interests, including the following:
 
    OWNERSHIP LIMIT. The 9.8% Ownership Limit described under "--Possible
  Adverse Consequences of Limits on Ownership of Host REIT Common Stock"
  below may have the effect of precluding a change in control of Host REIT by
  a third party without the consent of the Board of Directors, even if such
  change in control would be in the interest of the stockholders of Host REIT
  (and even if such change in control would not reasonably jeopardize the
  REIT status of Host REIT).
 
    STAGGERED BOARD. The Host REIT Charter will provide that the Board of
  Directors initially shall consist of eight members and may be thereafter
  increased or decreased in accordance with the Host REIT Bylaws, provided
  that the total number of directors may not be fewer than three nor more
  than thirteen. Pursuant to the Host REIT Bylaws, the number of directors
  shall be fixed by the Board of Directors within the limit set forth in the
  Host REIT Charter. The Board of Directors of Host REIT will be divided into
  three classes of directors. The terms of the first, second and third
  classes will expire in 1999, 2000 and 2001, respectively. Directors for
  each class will be chosen for a three-year term upon the expiration of the
  then current class' term, beginning in 1999. The staggered terms for
  directors may affect the stockholders' ability
 
                                      33

<PAGE>
 
  to effect a change in control of Host REIT even if a change in control
  would be in the interest of the stockholders of Host REIT.
 
    REMOVAL OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS. The Host REIT Charter will provide that,
  except for any directors who may be elected by holders of a class or series
  of shares of capital stock other than Host REIT Common Stock, directors may
  be removed only for cause and only by the affirmative vote of stockholders
  holding at least two-thirds of the shares then outstanding and entitled to
  be cast for the election of directors. Vacancies on the Board of Directors
  may be filled by the concurring vote of a majority of the remaining
  directors and, in the case of a vacancy resulting from the removal of a
  director by the stockholders by at least two-thirds of all the votes
  entitled to be cast in the election of directors.
 
    PREFERRED STOCK; CLASSIFICATION OR RECLASSIFICATION OF UNISSUED SHARES OF
  CAPITAL STOCK WITHOUT STOCKHOLDER APPROVAL. The Host REIT Charter provides
  that the total number of shares of stock of all classes which Host REIT has
  authority to issue is 800,000,000 shares of stock, initially consisting of
  750,000,000 shares of Host REIT Common Stock, par value $.01 per share, and
  50,000,000 shares of preferred stock, par value $.01 per share ("Host REIT
  Preferred Stock"). The Board of Directors is authorized, without a vote of
  stockholders, to classify or reclassify any unissued shares of stock,
  including Host REIT Common Stock into Host REIT Preferred Stock or vice
  versa, and to establish the preferences and rights of any preferred or
  other class or series of stock to be issued. The issuance of preferred
  shares or other stock having special preferences or rights could have the
  effect of delaying or preventing a change in control of Host REIT even if a
  change in control would be in the interest of the stockholders of Host
  REIT. Because the Board of Directors will have the power to establish the
  preferences and rights of additional classes or series of stock without a
  stockholder vote, the Board of Directors may afford the holders of any such
  class or series preferences, powers and rights, including voting rights,
  senior to the rights of holders of the Host REIT Common Stock.
 
    CONSENT RIGHTS OF THE LIMITED PARTNERS. Under the Partnership Agreement,
  Host REIT generally will be able to merge or consolidate with another
  entity with the consent of partners holding percentage interests in the
  Operating Partnership ("Percentage Interests") that are more than 50% of
  the aggregate Percentage Interests of the outstanding partnership interests
  entitled to vote thereon (including any such partnership interests held by
  Host REIT) as long as the holders of OP Units either will receive or will
  have the right to receive the same consideration as the holders of Host
  REIT Common Stock. Host REIT, as holder of a majority of the OP Units,
  would be able to control the outcome of such vote. Under the Host REIT
  Charter, the approval of the holders of at least two-thirds of the
  outstanding Host REIT Common Stock generally is necessary to effectuate
  such merger or consolidation.
 
    MARYLAND BUSINESS COMBINATION LAW. Under the MGCL, certain "business
  combinations" (including certain issuances of equity securities) between a
  Maryland corporation and any person who owns 10% or more of the voting
  power of the corporation's then outstanding shares (an "Interested
  Stockholder") or an affiliate of the Interested Stockholder are prohibited
  for five years after the most recent date in which the Interested
  Stockholder becomes an Interested Stockholder. Thereafter, any such
  business combination must be approved by a supermajority (80%) of
  outstanding voting shares, and by two-thirds of voting shares other than
  voting shares held by an Interested Stockholder unless, among other
  conditions, the corporation's common stockholders receive a minimum price
  (as defined in the MGCL) for their shares and the consideration is received
  in cash or in the same form as previously paid by the Interested
  Stockholder. Host REIT will be subject to the Maryland business combination
  statute. See "Certain Provisions of Maryland Law and The Host REIT Charter
  and Bylaws--Changes in Control Pursuant to Maryland Law."
 
    MARYLAND CONTROL SHARE ACQUISITION LAW. Under the MGCL, "control shares"
  acquired in a "control share acquisition" have no voting rights except to
  the extent approved by a vote of two-thirds of the votes entitled to be
  cast on the matter, excluding shares owned by the acquiror and by officers
  or directors who are employees of the corporation. "Control shares" are
  voting shares which, if aggregated with all other such shares previously
  acquired by the acquiror or in respect of which the acquiror is able to
  exercise or direct the exercise of voting power (except solely by virtue of
  a revocable proxy), would entitle the acquiror to exercise voting power in
  electing directors within one of the following ranges of voting
 
                                      34

<PAGE>
 
  power: (i) one-fifth or more but less than one-third, (ii) one-third or
  more but less than a majority or (iii) a majority or more of the voting
  power. Control shares do not include shares the acquiring person is then
  entitled to vote as a result of having previously obtained stockholder
  approval. A "control share acquisition" means the acquisition of control
  shares, subject to certain exceptions. Host REIT will be subject to these
  control share provisions of Maryland law.
 
    ADVANCE NOTICE OF DIRECTOR NOMINATIONS AND NEW BUSINESS. The Host REIT
  Bylaws impose certain advance notice requirements that must be met for
  nominations of persons for election to the Board of Directors and the
  proposal of business to be considered by stockholders. The advance notice
  provisions contained in the Host REIT Bylaws generally require nominations
  and new business proposals by stockholders to be delivered to the Secretary
  of Host REIT not later than the close of business on the 60th day nor
  earlier than the close of business on the 90th day prior to the first
  anniversary of the preceding year's annual meeting.
 
    MEETINGS OF STOCKHOLDERS; CALL OF SPECIAL MEETINGS; STOCKHOLDER ACTION IN
  LIEU OF MEETING BY UNANIMOUS CONSENT. The Host REIT Bylaws provide that
  annual meetings of stockholders shall be held on a date and at the time set
  by the Board of Directors during the month of May each year (commencing in
  May 1999). Special meetings of the stockholders may be called by the
  President or the Board of Directors or on the written request of
  stockholders entitled to cast a majority of all the votes entitled to be
  cast at the meeting. Any action required or permitted to be taken by the
  stockholders must be effected at a duly called annual or special meeting of
  stockholders or by unanimous written consent.
 
    MERGER, CONSOLIDATION, SHARE EXCHANGE AND TRANSFER OF ASSETS OF HOST
  REIT. Pursuant to the Host REIT Charter, subject to the terms of any class
  or series of capital stock at the time outstanding, Host REIT may merge
  with or into another entity, may consolidate with one or more other
  entities, may participate in a share exchange or may transfer its assets
  within the meaning of the MGCL if approved (i) by the Board of Directors in
  the manner provided in the MGCL and (ii) by stockholders by the affirmative
  vote of two-thirds of all the votes entitled to be cast on the matter,
  except that any merger of Host REIT with or into a trust organized for the
  purpose of changing Host REIT's form of organization from a corporation to
  a trust will require the approval of stockholders of Host REIT by the
  affirmative vote only of a majority of all the votes entitled to be cast on
  the matter. Under the MGCL, certain mergers may be accomplished without a
  vote of stockholders and a share exchange need be approved by a Maryland
  successor only by its Board of Directors. A voluntary dissolution of Host
  REIT also would require the affirmative vote of two-thirds of all the votes
  entitled to be cast on the matter.
 
    DETERMINATION OF ADVISABILITY OF MERGERS, CONSOLIDATIONS, SHARE
  EXCHANGES, TRANSFERS OF ASSETS AND OTHER BUSINESS COMBINATIONS INVOLVING
  HOST REIT. The Host REIT Charter will provide that, in determining whether
  a merger, consolidation, share exchange, transfer of assets or other
  business combination involving Host REIT is advisable, a director shall
  consider the interests of the stockholders of Host REIT and, in his sole
  discretion, may consider (i) the interests of Host REIT's employees,
  suppliers, creditors and customers, (ii) the economy of the nation, (iii)
  community and societal interests and (iv) the long-term as well as short-
  term interests of Host REIT and its stockholders, including the possibility
  that such interests may be best served by the continued independence of
  Host REIT.
 
    AMENDMENTS TO THE HOST REIT CHARTER AND BYLAWS. The provisions contained
  in the Host REIT Charter relating to restrictions on transferability of
  Host REIT Common Stock, the classified Board and fixing the size of the
  Board within the range set forth in the Host REIT Charter, as well as the
  provisions relating to removal of directors, the filling of Board vacancies
  and other constituencies that may be considered in determining the
  advisability of mergers, consolidations, share exchanges and transfers of
  assets and other business combinations involving Host REIT, may be amended
  only by a resolution adopted by the Board of Directors and approved by
  stockholders by the affirmative vote of the holders of not less than two-
  thirds of the votes entitled to be cast on the matter. As permitted under
  the MGCL, the Host REIT Bylaws provide that directors have the exclusive
  right to amend the Host REIT Bylaws.
 
 
 
                                      35

<PAGE>
 
    MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL PURCHASE RIGHT. In connection with Host's spin-off
  of Marriott International in 1993, Marriott International obtained the
  right to purchase up to 20% of each class of Host's outstanding voting
  shares at the then fair market value upon the occurrence of certain change
  of control events involving Host (the "Marriott International Purchase
  Right"). The Marriott International Purchase Right will continue in effect
  after the Merger (until June 2017), subject to certain limitations intended
  to protect the REIT status of Host REIT. The Marriott International
  Purchase Right may have the effect of discouraging a takeover of Host REIT,
  because any person considering acquiring a substantial or controlling block
  of Host REIT Common Stock will face the possibility that its ability to
  obtain or exercise control would be impaired or made more expensive by the
  exercise of the Marriott International Purchase Right.
 
    STOCKHOLDER RIGHTS PLAN. Host REIT intends to adopt a Stockholder Rights
  Plan to replace the existing stockholder rights plan under the Host Rights
  Agreement. The new Stockholder Rights Plan is expected to provide, among
  other things, that upon the occurrence of certain events, stockholders will
  be entitled to purchase from Host REIT a newly created series of junior
  preferred stock, subject to Host REIT's Ownership Limit. The preferred
  stock purchase rights will be triggered by the earlier to occur of (i) ten
  days following the date of a public announcement that a person or group
  acting in concert has acquired, or obtained the right to acquire,
  beneficial ownership of 20% or more of the outstanding shares of Host REIT
  Common Stock or (ii) ten business days following the commencement of or
  announcement of an intention to make a tender or exchange offer, the
  consummation of which would result in the acquiring person becoming the
  beneficial owner of 20% or more of such outstanding shares of Host REIT
  Common Stock. The preferred stock purchase rights would cause substantial
  dilution to a person or group that attempts to acquire Host REIT on terms
  not approved by the Board of Directors. See "Description of Host REIT
  Capital Stock" and "--Certain Provisions of Maryland Law and the Host REIT
  Charter and Bylaws."
 
  EFFECT ON STOCK PRICE OF SHARES AVAILABLE FOR FUTURE SALE. Sales of a
substantial number of shares of Host REIT Common Stock, or the perception that
such sales could occur, could adversely affect prevailing market prices for
Host REIT Common Stock. Limited Partners who elect to receive shares of Host
REIT Common Stock in connection with the Partnership Mergers will be able to
sell such shares at any time after they are received (unless held by an
affiliate of Host REIT). Beginning July 1, 1999, half of the approximately
43.7 million OP Units to be issued in the Blackstone Acquisition will become
redeemable pursuant to the holder's right to redeem them for shares of Host
REIT Common Stock or the cash equivalent thereof (as elected by Host REIT)
("Unit Redemption Right"), an additional 25% will be redeemable on October 1,
1999, and the balance will be redeemable on January 1, 2000. In addition,
beginning at least one year after the effective date of the Partnership
Mergers (or after a lesser period in certain circumstances), other holders of
OP Units, including Limited Partners who retain OP Units received in the
Partnership Mergers, may be able to sell shares of Host REIT Common Stock
received upon exercise of their Unit Redemption Right in the public market
pursuant to registration or exemptions from registration. Further, a
substantial number of shares of Host REIT Common Stock would, pursuant to
employee benefit plans, be issued or reserved for issuance from time to time,
including Host REIT Common Stock reserved for issuance pursuant to options
granted prior to the consummation of the REIT Conversion, and these shares of
Host REIT Common Stock would be available for sale in the public markets from
time to time pursuant to exemptions from registration or upon registration.
Moreover, the issuance of additional Host REIT Common Stock by Host or Host
REIT in the future (including any Host REIT Common Stock that may be issued in
connection with the Initial E&P Distribution) would be available for sale in
the public markets. Although not yet certain, it is currently contemplated
that the Initial E&P Distribution will include a nontransferable right
entitling Host stockholders who receive the Initial E&P Distribution and the
Blackstone Entities to elect to receive either a specified dollar amount of
cash or a specified fraction of a share of Host Common Stock (or a share of
Host REIT Common Stock if the Merger has occurred). No prediction can be made
about the effect that future sales of shares of Host REIT Common Stock would
have on the market price of Host REIT Common Stock.
 
  EFFECT ON STOCK PRICE OF MARKET CONDITIONS. As with other publicly traded
equity securities, the value of Host REIT Common Stock will depend upon
various market conditions, which may change from time to time. Among the
market conditions that may affect the value of the Host REIT Common Stock are
the following: (i)
 
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<PAGE>
 
the extent of institutional investor interest in Host REIT, (ii) the general
market perception of REITs in general and hotel REITs in particular and the
attractiveness of their equity securities in comparison to other equity
securities (including securities issued by other real estate-based companies),
(iii) Host REIT's financial performance, (iv) changes in the tax laws
affecting REITs (particularly REITs that primarily own hotels) and (v) general
stock and bond market conditions. There can be no assurance that these market
conditions would not have a material adverse effect on the market price of
Host REIT Common Stock or that the Host REIT Common Stock will not trade at
prices below the value of Host REIT's business and assets.
 
  EFFECT ON STOCK PRICE OF EARNINGS AND CASH DISTRIBUTIONS. It is generally
believed that the market value of the equity securities of a REIT is primarily
based upon the market's perception of the REIT's growth potential for its core
portfolio, the value of its real estate portfolio and its prospects for
accretive acquisitions and development. The combination of these factors
creates a market perception of a REIT's current and potential future cash
distributions, whether from operations, sales, acquisitions, development or
refinancings, and is secondarily based upon the value of the underlying
assets. For that reason, Host REIT Common Stock may trade at prices that are
higher or lower than the net asset value per share. To the extent Host REIT
retains operating cash flow for investment purposes, working capital reserves
or other purposes rather than distributing such cash flow to stockholders,
these retained funds, while increasing the value of Host REIT's underlying
assets, may not correspondingly increase the market price of Host REIT Common
Stock. The failure of Host REIT to meet the market's expectation with regard
to future earnings and cash distributions would likely adversely affect the
market price of Host REIT Common Stock.
 
  EFFECT ON STOCK PRICE OF MARKET INTEREST RATES. One of the factors that will
influence the price of Host REIT Common Stock will be the dividend yield on
Host REIT Common Stock (as a percentage of the price of Host REIT Common
Stock) relative to market interest rates. Thus, an increase in market interest
rates may lead prospective purchasers of Host REIT Common Stock to expect a
higher dividend yield, which would adversely affect the market price of Host
REIT Common Stock.
 
  EFFECT ON STOCK PRICE OF UNRELATED EVENTS. As with other publicly traded
equity securities, the value of Host REIT Common Stock will depend upon
various market conditions, including conditions unrelated to real estate
investments generally. Thus, events which depress equity market prices may not
have any effect on real estate market values, with the result that Host REIT
Common Stock may trade at prices below Host REIT's net asset value.
 
  DEPENDENCE ON EXTERNAL SOURCES OF CAPITAL. As with other REITs, but unlike
corporations generally, Host REIT's ability to reduce its debt and finance its
growth largely must be funded by external sources of capital because Host REIT
generally will have to distribute to its stockholders 95% of its taxable
income in order to qualify as a REIT (including taxable income where Host REIT
does not receive corresponding cash). Host REIT's access to external capital
will depend upon a number of factors, including general market conditions, the
market's perception of Host REIT's growth potential, its current and potential
future earnings, cash distributions and the market price of Host REIT Common
Stock.
 
FEDERAL INCOME TAX RISKS RELATING TO REIT QUALIFICATION
 
  GENERAL. Host REIT intends to operate so as to qualify as a REIT under the
Code effective for Host REIT's first full taxable year commencing following
the REIT Conversion. A REIT generally is not taxed at the corporate level on
income it currently distributes to its stockholders as long as it distributes
currently at least 95% of its taxable income (excluding net capital gain). No
assurance can be provided, however, that Host REIT will so qualify or be able
to remain so qualified or that new legislation, Treasury Regulations,
administrative interpretations or court decisions will not significantly
change the tax laws with respect to Host REIT's qualification as a REIT or the
federal income tax consequences of such qualification. In this regard, Host
REIT has received an opinion of Hogan & Hartson L.L.P. to the effect that Host
REIT, effective for its first full taxable year commencing after the REIT
Conversion is completed, will be organized in conformity with the requirements
for qualification as a REIT under the Code, and that Host REIT's proposed
method of operation will enable it to
 
                                      37

<PAGE>
 
satisfy the requirements for qualification and taxation as a REIT. This
opinion is conditioned upon completion of the REIT Conversion and upon certain
factual representations made by Host REIT and the Operating Partnership as to
matters relating to the organization and operation of Host REIT, the Operating
Partnership, the Partnerships and the Private Partnerships, the Subsidiary
Partnerships, the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries, the Host Employee Trust and
Crestline and the Lessees. In addition, this opinion is based upon the factual
representations of Host REIT concerning its business and properties as set
forth in this Proxy Statement/Prospectus and assumes that the actions
described in this Proxy Statement/Prospectus are completed in a timely
fashion. Moreover, an opinion of counsel does not bind the IRS or the courts,
and no assurance can be provided that such opinion will not be challenged by
the IRS or will be sustained by a court if so challenged.
 
  REQUIRED DISTRIBUTIONS AND PAYMENTS. In order to qualify as a REIT, Host
REIT will be required each year to distribute to its stockholders at least 95%
of its net taxable income (excluding any net capital gain). Due to certain
transactions entered into in prior years, Host REIT is expected to recognize
substantial amounts of "phantom" taxable income in future years that is not
matched by cash flow or EBITDA to the Operating Partnership or Host REIT. As
discussed below in "--"Earnings and Profits" Attributable to "C" Corporation
Taxable Years," to qualify as a REIT, Host REIT also will have to distribute
to its stockholders not later than the end of its first full taxable year as a
REIT an amount equal to the E&P accumulated by Host and its subsidiaries and
not distributed before or at the time of the REIT Conversion (including any
increases thereto resulting from subsequent IRS audits of years prior to Host
REIT's first taxable year as a REIT). In addition, Host REIT will be subject
to a 4% nondeductible excise tax on the amount, if any, by which certain
distributions made by it with respect to the calendar year are less than the
sum of (i) 85% of its ordinary income, (ii) 95% of its capital gain net income
for that year, and (iii) any undistributed taxable income from prior periods.
Host REIT intends to make distributions to its stockholders to comply with the
95% distribution requirement and to avoid the nondeductible excise tax and
will rely for this purpose on distributions from the Operating Partnership.
However, differences in timing between taxable income and cash available for
distribution due to, among other things, the seasonality of the hospitality
industry and the fact that some taxable income will be "phantom" income (i.e.,
taxable income that is not matched by cash flow or EBITDA to the Operating
Partnership) could require the Operating Partnership to borrow funds or to
issue additional equity to enable Host REIT to meet the 95% distribution
requirement (and therefore to maintain its REIT status) and to avoid the
nondeductible excise tax. Host REIT also could be required to pay taxes and
liabilities attributable to periods and events prior to the REIT Conversion
and taxes in the event it were to fail to qualify as a REIT. In addition, the
Operating Partnership's inability to retain earnings (resulting from Host
REIT's 95% and other distribution requirements) will generally require the
Operating Partnership to refinance debt that matures with additional debt or
equity. There can be no assurance that any of these sources of funds, if
available at all, would be available to meet the Operating Partnership's
distribution and tax obligations.
 
  CONSEQUENCES OF FAILURE TO QUALIFY AS A REIT. If Host REIT fails to qualify
as a REIT, it will be subject to federal income tax (including any applicable
alternative minimum tax) on its taxable income at regular corporate rates. In
addition, unless entitled to relief under certain statutory provisions, Host
REIT will be disqualified from treatment as a REIT for the four taxable years
following the year during which REIT qualification is lost. The additional tax
would significantly reduce the cash available for distribution by Host REIT to
its stockholders. Failure of Host REIT to qualify as a REIT could reduce
materially the value of the Host REIT Common Stock and would cause all
distributions to stockholders to be taxable as ordinary income to the extent
of Host REIT's current and accumulated E&P (although, subject to certain
limitations under the Code, corporate distributees may be eligible for the
dividends received deduction with respect to these distributions). See
"Federal Income Tax Consequences--Federal Income Taxation of Host REIT
Following the Merger--Failure of Host REIT to Qualify as a REIT." Failure of
Host REIT to qualify as a REIT also would result in a default under the New
Senior Notes and the New Credit Facility.
 
  "EARNINGS AND PROFITS" ATTRIBUTABLE TO "C" CORPORATION TAXABLE YEARS. In
order to qualify as a REIT, Host REIT cannot have at the end of any taxable
year any undistributed E&P that is attributable to a "C" corporation taxable
year. A REIT has until the close of its first full taxable year as a REIT in
which it has non-
 
                                      38

<PAGE>
 
REIT E&P to distribute such accumulated E&P. Host REIT will be required to
distribute this E&P prior to the end of 1999 (the first full taxable year for
which the REIT election of Host REIT currently is expected to be effective).
Failure to do so would result in disqualification of Host REIT as a REIT at
least for taxable year 1999. Host REIT believes that the Initial E&P
Distribution, together with any additional distributions of non-REIT E&P made
after the REIT Conversion but prior to December 31, 1999, will be sufficient
to distribute all of the non-REIT E&P as of December 31, 1999, but there are
substantial uncertainties relating to the estimate of Host REIT's non-REIT E&P
and the value of noncash consideration to be distributed as part of the
Initial E&P Distribution and, thus, there can be no assurance that this
requirement will be met. Hogan & Hartson L.L.P. will not provide any opinion
as to the amount of Host's undistributed E&P and has relied, for purposes of
its opinion as to the qualification of Host REIT as a REIT, upon a
representation that Host REIT will not have any undistributed non-REIT E&P as
of the end of 1999. See "Federal Income Tax Consequences--Federal Income
Taxation of Host REIT Following the Merger--Requirements for Qualification."
 
  TREATMENT OF LEASES. To qualify as a REIT, a REIT must satisfy two gross
income tests. Rent paid pursuant to the Leases will constitute substantially
all of the gross income of Host REIT. In order for the rent paid pursuant to
the Leases to constitute qualifying income for purposes of the gross income
tests (a) the Leases must be respected as true leases for federal income tax
purposes and not be treated as service contracts, joint ventures or some other
type of arrangement and (b) the Lessees must not be regarded as "related party
tenants" (as defined in the Code). Hogan & Hartson L.L.P. has provided to Host
REIT an opinion to the effect that, based upon certain representations of Host
REIT regarding the terms of the Leases and the expectations of Host REIT and
the Lessees with respect thereto, the Leases will be respected as leases for
federal income tax purposes. An opinion of counsel, however, does not bind the
IRS or the courts and this determination ultimately will depend upon the
accuracy of the factual representations of Host REIT regarding the Leases. In
this regard, if the Leases were not respected as true leases for federal
income tax purposes or if the Lessees were regarded as "related party
tenants," Host REIT would not be able to satisfy either of the two gross
income tests applicable to REITs and, as a result, would lose its REIT status.
Accordingly, Host REIT would be subject to corporate level income taxation,
which would significantly reduce the cash available for distribution to its
stockholders. See "Federal Income Tax Consequences--Federal Income Taxation of
Host REIT Following the Merger--Income Tests Applicable to REITs."
 
  OTHER TAX LIABILITIES; HOST REIT'S SUBSTANTIAL DEFERRED AND CONTINGENT TAX
LIABILITIES. Even if Host REIT qualifies as a REIT, it will be subject,
through the Operating Partnership, the Partnerships and the Private
Partnerships, to certain federal, state and local taxes on its income and
property. See "Federal Income Tax Consequences--Federal Income Taxation of
Host REIT Following the Merger--General." In addition, Host REIT will be
subject to tax at the regular corporate rate (currently 35%) upon its share of
any gain recognized as a result of any sale by the Operating Partnership
(within the 10-year period beginning on the effective date of the OP
Contribution) of assets, including the full-service hotels, contributed to the
Operating Partnership by Host in connection with the OP Contribution, to the
extent that such gain existed as of the first day of Host REIT's first taxable
year as a REIT. Host has substantial deferred tax liabilities that likely will
be recognized by Host REIT in the next ten years as "built-in gain" under
these rules (or by a Non-Controlled Subsidiary), without any corresponding
receipt of cash by Host REIT or the Operating Partnership. In addition, the
IRS may assert liabilities against Host REIT for corporate income taxes for
taxable years of Host prior to the time Host REIT qualifies as a REIT.
Finally, the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries will be taxable "C" corporations and
will pay federal and state income tax on their net income at the full
applicable corporate rates.
 
  FAILURE OF THE OPERATING PARTNERSHIP TO QUALIFY AS A PARTNERSHIP. The
Operating Partnership and Host REIT have received an opinion of Hogan &
Hartson L.L.P. to the effect that the Operating Partnership will be treated as
a partnership for federal income tax purposes. An opinion of counsel, however,
does not bind the IRS or the courts, and no assurance can be provided that
such opinion will not be challenged by the IRS or will be sustained by a court
if so challenged. If the IRS were to treat successfully the Operating
Partnership as an entity that is taxable as a corporation, Host REIT would
cease to qualify as a REIT because the value of Host REIT's ownership interest
in the Operating Partnership would exceed 5% of Host REIT's assets and because
Host REIT
 
                                      39

<PAGE>
 
would be considered to hold more than 10% of the voting securities of another
corporation. See "Federal Income Tax Consequences--Federal Income Taxation of
Host REIT Following the Merger--Asset Tests Applicable to REITs." Moreover,
the imposition of a corporate tax on the Operating Partnership would reduce
significantly the amount of cash available for distribution to Host REIT (and
thus its stockholders). See "Federal Income Tax Consequences--Tax Aspects of
Host REITs Ownership of OP Units."
 
OTHER TAX RISKS
 
  TAX CONSEQUENCES OF THE OP CONTRIBUTION. Host believes that it will not
recognize a material amount of gain in connection with the OP Contribution.
However, the tax treatment of the OP Contribution is highly complex and
depends upon a number of factual determinations and other outside events which
may or may not occur. Thus, no assurance can be provided that Host will not
recognize more gain in connection with the OP Contribution than it currently
anticipates.
 
  EFFECTS OF SUBSEQUENT EVENTS UPON RECOGNITION OF GAIN. In addition to any
gain that might be recognized by Host at the time of the OP Contribution,
there are a variety of subsequent events and transactions including (i) the
sale or other taxable disposition of appreciated assets contributed by Host to
the Operating Partnership in the OP Contribution (including one or more of the
Hotels contributed by Host), (ii) the refinancing or repayment of certain
liabilities secured by one or more of the Hotels contributed to the Operating
Partnership by Host in the OP Contribution, (iii) the issuance of additional
OP Units, including in connection with the acquisition of additional
properties by the Operating Partnership in exchange for OP Units or other
equity interests in the Operating Partnership, (iv) an increase to the basis
of one or more of the Hotels contributed to the Operating Partnership by Host
in the OP Contribution resulting from capital expenditures and (v) the
elimination over time of the disparity between the current tax basis of one or
more of the Hotels contributed to the Operating Partnership by Host in the OP
Contribution and the "book basis" of such assets (based upon their fair market
value at the time of the OP Contribution) that could cause Host REIT to
recognize part or all of the taxable gain that otherwise has been deferred
pursuant to the Merger and the OP Contribution.
 
RISKS OF OPERATION
 
  COMPETITION IN THE LODGING INDUSTRY. The profitability of the Hotels is
subject to general economic conditions, the management abilities of the
Managers (including primarily Marriott International), competition, the
desirability of particular locations and other factors relating to the
operation of the Hotels. The full-service segment of the lodging industry in
which the Hotels primarily operate is highly competitive and the Hotels
generally operate in geographical markets that contain numerous competitors.
The Hotels' success will be dependent, in large part, upon their ability to
compete in such areas as access, location, quality of accommodations, room
rate structure, the quality and scope of food and beverage facilities and
other services and amenities. Although the competitive position of each of
Host REIT's hotel properties differs from market to market, Host REIT believes
that its properties generally compare favorably to their competitive set in
the markets in which they operate on the basis of these factors. Furthermore,
Host REIT's strategy is to affiliate its properties with managers operating
under the highest quality brand names in the industry which Host REIT believes
will enhance their competitive position. Nonetheless, there can be no
assurance that these managers will maintain the quality of their brand names.
Furthermore, competing properties may be built or existing products enhanced
such that they offer characteristics more favorable than those offered by Host
REIT's properties. See "Business and Properties--Competition." The lodging
industry, including the Hotels (and thus Host REIT), may be adversely affected
in the future by (i) national and regional economic conditions, (ii) changes
in travel patterns, (iii) taxes and government regulations which influence or
determine wages, prices, interest rates, construction procedures and costs,
(iv) the availability of credit and (v) other factors beyond the control of
Host REIT.
 
  SUBSTANTIAL INDEBTEDNESS OF HOST REIT. Host REIT will have substantial
indebtedness. As of June 19, 1998, on a pro forma basis assuming the Full
Participation Scenario, Host REIT had outstanding indebtedness totaling
approximately $5.0 billion, which represents an approximately 55% debt-to-
total market capitalization
 
                                      40

<PAGE>
 
ratio on a pro forma basis at such date (based upon a price per share of Host
REIT Common Stock of $13.00 after giving effect to the REIT Conversion). Host
REIT's business is capital intensive and it will have significant capital
requirements in the future. Host REIT's leverage level could affect its
ability to (i) obtain financing in the future, (ii) undertake refinancings on
terms and subject to conditions deemed acceptable by Host REIT, (iii) make
distributions, (iv) pursue its acquisition strategy or (v) compete effectively
or operate successfully under adverse economic conditions. In the event that
Host REIT's cash flow and working capital are not sufficient to fund Host
REIT's expenditures or to service its indebtedness, Host REIT would be
required to raise additional funds through capital contributions, the
refinancing of all or part of its indebtedness, the incurrence of additional
permitted indebtedness or the sale of assets. There can be no assurance that
any of these sources of funds would be available, if at all, in amounts
sufficient for Host REIT to meet its obligations. Moreover, even if Host REIT
were able to meet its obligations, its leveraged capital structure could
significantly limit its ability to finance its acquisition program and other
capital expenditures, to compete effectively or to operate successfully,
especially under adverse economic conditions.
 
  NO LIMITATION ON DEBT. Host REIT will have a policy of incurring debt only
if, immediately following such incurrence, its debt-to-total market
capitalization ratio on a pro forma basis would be 60% or less. However, there
are no limitations in Host REIT's or the Operating Partnership's
organizational documents that limit the amount of indebtedness that either
entity may incur, although the Operating Partnership's and Host REIT's debt
instruments will contain certain restrictions on the amount of indebtedness
that Host REIT may incur. Accordingly, the Board of Directors could alter or
eliminate this policy from time to time to the extent permitted by its debt
agreements. If this policy were changed, Host REIT could become more highly
leveraged, resulting in an increase in debt service payments that could
adversely affect Host REIT's cash flow and consequently, the cash available
for distributions to holders of OP Units, including Host REIT and, in turn, to
stockholders of Host REIT and could increase the risk of default on Host
REIT's indebtedness.
 
  THE BOARD MAY CHANGE INVESTMENT POLICIES WITHOUT STOCKHOLDER APPROVAL. Host
REIT's Board of Directors may change the investment, financing and other
policies of Host REIT without stockholder approval. Such policy changes may
have adverse consequences to Host REIT.
 
  MANAGEMENT AGREEMENTS COULD IMPAIR THE SALE OR OTHER DISPOSITION OF HOST
REIT'S HOTELS. Marriott International serves as the manager for all but 16 of
Host REIT's Hotels and provides various other services to Host and its
subsidiaries. Although the Lessees will have primary liability under the
Management Agreements as long as the Leases are in effect, Host REIT will
remain liable thereunder. The Hotels generally may not be sold or otherwise
transferred unless the transferee assumes the Management Agreements relating
thereto and meets certain other conditions. The possible desire of Host REIT,
from time to time, to finance, refinance or effect a sale of any of the
properties managed by Marriott International or another manager may, depending
upon the structure of such transactions, result in a need to modify the
Management Agreements with Marriott International or such other manager with
respect to such property. Any such modification proposed by Host REIT may not
be acceptable to Marriott International or such other manager, and the lack of
consent from Marriott International or such other manager could adversely
affect Host REIT's ability to consummate such financing, refinancing or sale.
In addition, certain situations could arise where actions taken by Marriott
International or another manager in its capacity as manager of competing
lodging properties would not necessarily be in the best interests of Host
REIT. Nevertheless, Host REIT believes that there is sufficient mutuality of
interest between Host REIT and Marriott International or another manager to
result in a mutually productive relationship.
 
  RENTAL REVENUES FROM HOTELS SUBJECT TO PRIOR RIGHTS OF LENDERS. In
accordance with the mortgage loan agreements with respect to outstanding
indebtedness of certain of the Partnerships or the Private Partnerships, the
rental revenues received by such Partnerships under certain Leases first will
be used to satisfy the debt service on such outstanding indebtedness with only
the cash flow remaining after debt service being available to satisfy other
obligations of such Partnership or Private Partnership (including paying
property taxes and insurance, funding the required FF&E reserves for the
Hotels and capital improvements and paying debt
 
                                      41

<PAGE>
 
service with respect to unsecured debt) and to make distributions to holders
of OP Units (including Host REIT) and Host REIT's ability, in turn, to make
distributions to stockholders of Host REIT.
 
  HOTELS SUBJECT TO GROUND LEASES MAY AFFECT HOST REIT'S REVENUES. Of the
approximately 125 Hotels in which Host REIT initially is expected to hold an
interest, approximately 45 are subject to ground leases. Such ground leases
generally require increases in ground rent payments every five years. To the
extent that the rents payable under the Leases do not increase at the same
rate as the increases under the ground leases, it could affect Host REIT's
cash available for distributions to holders of OP Units, including Host REIT,
and Host REIT's ability, in turn, to make cash available for distributions to
stockholders of Host REIT. In addition, any sale of a Hotel encumbered by a
ground lease would be made subject to such ground lease and the value realized
by Host REIT in such sale might not be as high if such Hotel were not sold
subject to such ground lease or were sold subject thereto.
 
  GENERAL REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT RISKS. Host REIT stockholders will continue
to bear risks associated with real estate investments. The yields available
from equity investments in real estate and Host REIT's ability to service debt
depend, in large part, upon the amount of rental revenues generated, expenses
incurred and capital expenditures required in the operation of its business.
Host REIT's income and ability to make distributions will be dependent upon
the rent payable by the Lessees exceeding the amounts required for debt
service, property taxes and other expenses payable by Host REIT (including
required FF&E reserves and capital expenditures). The rental payments payable
by the Lessees will be affected in part by the sales generated by the Managers
from operation of the Hotels. The Lessees' ability to pay rent accrued under
the Leases will depend in significant part upon the ability of the Managers to
generate gross sales in excess of its requirements to meet operating expenses.
Host REIT's rental income from the Hotels may, therefore, directly or
indirectly, be adversely affected by a number of factors, including the
general economic climate, local real estate conditions, such as an oversupply
of, or a reduction in demand for, hotel space, the attractiveness of the
Hotels to consumers, the quality, philosophy and performance of management,
the ability of the Lessees to maximize rental payments to Host REIT, the
ability of the Manager to effectively operate the Hotels, competition from
comparable hotels, changes in room rates and increases in operating costs due
to inflation and other factors, which increases may not necessarily be passed
through fully to guests. In addition, Host REIT's rental income from the
Hotels and real estate values also are affected by such factors as the cost of
compliance with government regulation, including zoning and tax laws, the
potential for liability under applicable laws, interest rate levels and the
availability of financing. Certain significant expenditures associated with
each equity investment in a Hotel (such as mortgage payments, if any, real
estate taxes and maintenance costs) also may not decrease even though
circumstances cause a reduction in Host REIT's rental income from the Hotel.
If any of the above occurs, Host REIT's ability to make distributions to
holders of OP Units, including Host REIT, and Host REIT's ability, in turn, to
make distributions to its stockholders, could be adversely affected.
 
  POSSIBLE UNDERPERFORMANCE OF NEW ACQUISITIONS. In the future, Host REIT
expects to pursue acquisitions of additional full-service hotels and other
types of real estate. Acquisitions entail the risk that such investments will
fail to perform in accordance with expectations. Host REIT anticipates that,
in certain circumstances, it may use OP Units in the Operating Partnership as
consideration to acquire hotels from tax-sensitive sellers and, in connection
with such acquisitions, it may agree to certain restrictions on the Operating
Partnership's ability to sell, or reduce the amount of mortgage indebtedness
on, such acquired hotels, which may increase Host REIT's leverage and which
may impair Host REIT's ability to take actions that would otherwise be in the
best interests of Host REIT.
 
  SEASONALITY. The hotel industry is seasonal in nature. The seasonality of
the industry may, from time to time, affect either the amount of rent that
accrues under the Leases or the ability of the Lessees to make timely rent
payments under the Leases. An inability of the Lessees to make timely rent
payments to Host REIT could adversely affect the ability of Host REIT to make
distributions to holders of OP Units, including Host REIT, and Host REIT's
ability, in turn, to make distributions to its stockholders.
 
  ILLIQUIDITY OF REAL ESTATE. Real estate investments are relatively illiquid
and, therefore, will tend to limit the ability of Host REIT to sell and
purchase hotels promptly in response to changes in economic or other
 
                                      42

<PAGE>
 
conditions. This could make it difficult for Host REIT to sell any of its
Hotels, even if a sale were in the interest of Host REIT.
 
MISCELLANEOUS RISKS
 
  CHANGES IN LAWS. Increases in real estate or business improvement district
taxes will not result in increased rental payments to Host REIT under the
Leases, with the result that they may adversely affect Host REIT's cash flow
from operations and its ability to maintain the expected level of
distributions to holders of OP Units, including Host REIT, and, in turn, to
Host REIT's stockholders. Similarly, changes in laws increasing the potential
liability for environmental conditions existing at Hotels or increasing the
restrictions on discharges or other conditions, as well as changes in laws
affecting construction and safety requirements, may result in significant
unanticipated capital expenditures, which, to the extent such expenditures
must be borne by Host REIT as the lessor of the Hotels, would adversely affect
Host REIT's cash flow from operations and its ability to make distributions to
holders of OP Units, including Host REIT and Host REIT's ability, in turn, to
make distributions to its stockholders.
 
  DEPENDENCE UPON KEY PERSONNEL. Host REIT is dependent upon the efforts of
its executive officers. While Host REIT believes that it could find
replacements for these key personnel, the loss of their services could have a
significant adverse effect on the operations of Host REIT. Host REIT does not
intend to obtain key-man life insurance with respect to any of its executive
officers.
 
  POTENTIAL LITIGATION RELATED TO THE REIT CONVERSION. Over the last several
years, business reorganizations involving the combination of several
partnerships into a single entity occasionally have given rise to investor
lawsuits. These lawsuits have involved claims against the general partners of
the participating partnerships, the partnerships themselves and related
persons involved in the structuring of, or benefiting from, the conversion or
reorganization, as well as claims against the surviving entity and its
directors and officers. For example, limited partners of five of the six
limited partnerships controlled by Host that own limited service and extended-
stay hotels have filed a lawsuit against Host and the general partners (which
are subsidiaries of Host) of such limited partnerships alleging, among other
things, breaches of their fiduciary duties in connection with a potential
consolidation transaction. Certain other lawsuits are pending against Host and
its affiliates by limited partners in certain Partnerships. If any lawsuits
are filed in connection with the Partnership Mergers or other transactions
comprising the REIT Conversion, such lawsuits could delay the closing of the
REIT Conversion or result in substantial damage claims against Host REIT or
the general partners of the Partnerships, each of which is a wholly owned,
direct or indirect subsidiary of Host. The Partnerships are each obligated to
indemnify their general partner for claims against them arising from their
role as general partner other than to the extent they are guilty of
negligence, fraud, misconduct or breach of fiduciary duty. Because Host REIT
will be acquiring the Partnerships or Private Partnerships through the
Partnership Mergers, the Operating Partnership and Host REIT indirectly will
be subject to the indemnification obligations of the Partnerships and the
Private Partnerships to their general partners and any obligations of the
Partnerships and the Private Partnerships to pay damages to the extent not
covered by any available insurance. See "Business and Properties--Legal
Proceedings."
 
  RISK INVOLVED IN INVESTMENTS THROUGH PARTNERSHIPS OR JOINT VENTURES. Instead
of purchasing hotel properties directly, Host REIT may invest as a co-
venturer. Joint venturers often have shared control over the operation of the
joint venture assets. Therefore, such investments may, under certain
circumstances, involve risks such as the possibility that the co-venturer in
an investment might become bankrupt, or have economic or business interests or
goals that are inconsistent with the business interests or goals of Host REIT,
or be in a position to take action contrary to the instructions or the
requests of Host REIT or contrary to Host REIT's policies or objectives.
Consequently, actions by a co-venturer might result in subjecting hotel
properties owned by the joint venture to additional risk. Although Host REIT
generally will seek to maintain sufficient control of any joint venture to
permit Host REIT's objectives to be achieved, it may be unable to take action
without the approval of its joint venture partners or its joint venture
partners could take actions binding on the joint venture without Host REIT's
consent. Additionally, should a joint venture partner become bankrupt, Host
REIT could become liable for such partner's share of joint venture
liabilities.
 
                                      43

<PAGE>
 
  UNINSURED LOSS. Host REIT will carry comprehensive liability, fire, flood,
extended coverage and rental loss (for rental losses extending up to 12
months) with respect to its Hotels with policy specification and insured
limits customarily carried for similar hotels. Certain types of losses (such
as from earthquakes and environmental hazards), however, may be either
uninsurable or not economically insurable. Should an uninsured loss occur,
Host REIT could lose both its capital invested in, and anticipated profits
from, one or more of its Hotels.
 
  AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. The Hotels must comply with Title III of
the Americans with Disabilities Act (the "ADA") to the extent that such Hotels
are "public accommodations" or "commercial facilities" as defined by the ADA.
The ADA may require removal of structural barriers to access by persons with
disabilities in certain public areas of Host REIT's Hotels where such removal
is readily achievable. Host REIT believes that the Hotels will not be required
to make substantial non-budgeted capital expenditures to address the
requirements of the ADA. However, noncompliance with the ADA could result in
substantial capital expenditures to remove structural barriers, as well as the
imposition of fines or an award of damages to private litigants which might
adversely affect Host REIT's ability to make expected distributions to holders
of OP Units, including Host REIT and Host REIT's ability, in turn, to make
distributions to its stockholders. Under the Leases, Host REIT would be
required to fund all such expenditures.
 
  OTHER REGULATORY ISSUES. Host REIT's Hotels will be subject to various forms
of regulation in addition to the ADA, including building codes, regulations
pertaining to fire safety and other regulations which may from time to time be
enacted. Host REIT may be required to incur significant costs to comply with
any future changes in such regulations.
 
  POSSIBLE ENVIRONMENTAL LIABILITIES. Under various federal, state and local
laws, ordinances and regulations, owners or operators of real estate may be
required to investigate and clean up certain hazardous substances released at
a property, and may be held liable to a governmental entity or to third
parties for property damage or personal injuries and for investigation and
clean-up costs incurred by the parties in connection with any contamination.
In addition, some environmental laws create a lien on a contaminated site in
favor of the government for damages and costs it incurs in connection with the
contamination. The presence of contamination or the failure to remediate
contamination may adversely affect the owner's ability to sell or lease real
estate or to borrow using the real estate as collateral. No assurances can be
given that (i) a prior owner, operator or occupant, such as a tenant, did not
create a material environmental condition not known to Host REIT, (ii) a
material environmental condition with respect to any Hotel does not exist or
(iii) future uses or conditions (including, without limitation, changes in
applicable environmental laws and regulations) will not result in the
imposition of environmental liability.
 
  In addition, no assurances can be given that all potential environmental
liabilities have been identified or properly quantified. Moreover, no
assurances can be given that (i) future laws, ordinances, or regulations will
not impose any material environmental liability or (ii) the current
environmental condition of the Hotels will not be affected by the condition of
land or operations in the vicinity of the Hotels (such as the presence of
underground storage tanks) or by third parties unrelated to Host REIT.
 
                                      44

<PAGE>
 
                             CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
 
  As discussed below, the operation of Host REIT involves various potential
conflicts of interest.
 
RESPONSIBILITIES OF HOST REIT TO OTHER LIMITED PARTNERS IN THE OPERATING
PARTNERSHIP
 
  After the REIT Conversion, Host REIT, as the sole general partner of the
Operating Partnership, will have fiduciary obligations to the limited partners
in the Operating Partnership, and the discharge of such obligations may result
in decisions that do not fully reflect the interests of Host REIT's
stockholders.
 
POTENTIAL CONFLICTS INVOLVING MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL AND CRESTLINE
 
  Marriott International currently serves as manager for all but 16 of Host's
Hotels, and will continue to manage those Hotels pursuant to the Management
Agreements that will be assigned to the Lessees. In addition, Marriott
International acts as manager of hotels that will compete with Host REIT's
Hotels. As a result, Marriott International may make decisions regarding
competing lodging facilities which it manages that would not necessarily be in
the best interests of Host REIT or the Lessees. Further, J.W. Marriott, Jr.
and Richard E. Marriott, who are brothers, currently serve as directors of
Host and directors (and, in the case of J.W. Marriott, Jr., also an officer)
of Marriott International. After the REIT Conversion, J.W. Marriott, Jr. will
serve as a director of Host REIT and will continue to serve as a director of
Marriott International, and Richard E. Marriott will serve as Chairman of the
Board of Host REIT and continue to serve as a director of Marriott
International. J.W. Marriott, Jr. and Richard E. Marriott also beneficially
own approximately % and  %, respectively, of the outstanding shares of common
stock of Marriott International, and will beneficially own  % and  %,
respectively, of the outstanding shares of common stock of Crestline (but
neither will serve as an officer or director thereof). As a result, J.W.
Marriott, Jr. and Richard E. Marriott may have a potential conflict of
interest with respect to their obligations as directors of Host REIT in
connection with any decisions regarding Marriott International itself
(including decisions relating to the Management Agreements involving the
Hotels), Marriott International's management of competing lodging properties
and Crestline's leasing and other businesses that would not necessarily be in
the best interests of Host REIT.
 
POLICIES WITH RESPECT TO CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
 
  Host REIT has adopted certain policies and will enter into agreements with
the Operating Partnership and others designed to minimize the adverse effects
of these potential conflicts of interest. See "Distribution and Other
Policies--Conflicts of Interest Policies" and "Business and Properties--
Noncompetition Agreements." There can be no assurance, however, that the
policies and agreements will be successful in eliminating the influence of
such conflicts, and if they are not successful, decisions could be made at the
Host REIT level that might not fully reflect fully the interests of the
stockholders of Host REIT.
 
                                      45

<PAGE>
 
                              VOTING AND PROXIES
 
  This Proxy Statement/Prospectus is being furnished to holders of Host Common
Stock on the Record Date in connection with the solicitation of proxies by
Host's Board of Directors for use at the Special Meeting to be held at
on December , 1998 at   , local time, or at any adjournments or postponements
thereof, for the purposes set forth herein and in the accompanying Notice of
Special Meeting of Stockholders of Host.
 
  This Proxy Statement/Prospectus and the accompanying proxy cards are being
first mailed to Host's stockholders on or about November , 1998.
 
MATTERS TO BE CONSIDERED AT THE SPECIAL MEETING
 
  At the Special Meeting, stockholders of record as of the close of business
on the Record Date will be asked to (i) consider and vote upon the Agreement
which contemplates (a) the OP Contribution and (b) the Merger, and (ii)
transact such other business as may properly come before the Special Meeting
or any adjournments or postponements thereof.
 
RECORD DATE AND OUTSTANDING SHARES
 
  Only holders of record of Host Common Stock at the close of business on the
Record Date are entitled to notice of and to vote at the Special Meeting. As
of the Record Date, there were    shares of Host Common Stock and no shares of
preferred stock of Host issued and outstanding and  holders of record. Each
stockholder of Host is entitled to one vote for each share of Host Common
Stock held as of the close of business on the Record Date.
 
VOTING OF PROXIES
 
  The proxy accompanying this Proxy Statement/Prospectus is solicited on
behalf of Host's Board of Directors for use at the Special Meeting.
Stockholders are requested to complete, date and sign the accompanying proxy
and promptly return it in the accompanying envelope or otherwise mail it to
Host. If no instructions are indicated, such proxies will be voted for
approval of the Agreement at the Special Meeting. Host's Board of Directors
currently is not aware of any matters other than the Agreement referred to
herein which will come before the Special Meeting. If any other matter should
be properly presented at the Special Meeting for action, the persons named in
the accompanying proxy card will vote the proxy in their own discretion.
 
VOTE REQUIRED
 
  Under the DGCL, the affirmative vote of a majority of the outstanding
capital stock of the corporation entitled to vote thereon is needed to adopt a
merger agreement. Similarly, if the OP Contribution were deemed to constitute
a sale, lease or exchange of all or substantially all of the assets of Host
under the DGCL, the affirmative vote of a majority of the outstanding capital
stock of the corporation entitled to vote thereon would be needed to approve
the OP Contribution. Pursuant to the Host Certificate, the affirmative vote of
the holders of two-thirds (66 2/3%) of the outstanding shares of Host Common
Stock is necessary for approval of the Merger, as well as the OP Contribution
if it were deemed to constitute a sale, lease or exchange of all or
substantially all of the assets of Host.
 
  On the Record Date, directors and executive officers of Host, together with
their affiliates, as a group, beneficially owned approximately  % of the
issued and outstanding shares of Host Common Stock. It is currently expected
that each director and executive officer of Host will vote the shares of Host
Common Stock beneficially owned by such director or executive officer for
approval of the Agreement and the transactions contemplated thereby. See
"Principal Stockholders."
 
  Under the DGCL, the stockholders of Host will not be entitled to dissenters'
rights of appraisal as a result of the Merger or other Restructuring
Transactions. See "The Restructuring Transactions--Absence of Dissenters'
Rights."
 
                                      46

<PAGE>
 
QUORUM; ABSTENTIONS AND TREATMENT OF BROKER NON-VOTES; ADJOURNMENT; REVOCATION
 
  The holders of a majority of the shares of Host Common Stock issued and
outstanding and entitled to vote at the Special Meeting, present in person or
by proxy, will constitute a quorum at the Special Meeting. Abstentions and
broker non-votes will be counted for purposes of determining the presence of a
quorum at the Special Meeting.
 
  Votes cast in person or by proxy at the Special Meeting will be tabulated by
the inspectors of election appointed for the Special Meeting, who will
determine whether or not a quorum is present. Votes may be cast for, against
or as abstentions. Broker/dealers who hold their customers' shares in street
name may, under the applicable rules of the exchange and other self-regulatory
organizations of which the broker/dealers are members, sign and submit proxies
for such shares and may vote such shares on routine matters, which, under such
rules, typically include the election of directors. However, broker/dealers
may not vote such shares on certain other matters, which typically include
transactions related to mergers, without specific instructions from the
customer who owns such shares. Proxies signed and submitted by broker/dealers
which have not been voted on certain matters as described in the previous
sentence are referred to as broker non-votes. Because approval of the
Agreement requires the affirmative vote of not less than two-thirds percent
(66 2/3%) of the shares of Host Common Stock outstanding, abstentions and
broker non-votes will have the same effect as votes AGAINST the Agreement.
 
  In the event that a quorum is not present at the time the Special Meeting is
convened, or if for any other reason Host believes that additional time should
be allowed for the solicitation of proxies, Host may adjourn the Special
Meeting with or without a vote of the stockholders. If Host proposes to
adjourn the Special Meeting by a vote of the stockholders, the persons named
in the enclosed proxy card will vote all shares of Host Common Stock for which
they have voting authority in favor of such adjournment.
 
  Each stockholder who signs and returns a proxy in the form enclosed with
this Proxy Statement/Prospectus may revoke it at any time prior to its
exercise by giving notice of such revocation in writing to the Secretary of
Host, by signing and timely returning a later dated proxy, or by voting in
person at the Special Meeting. Unless so revoked, the shares of Host Common
Stock represented by each such proxy will be voted at the meeting and any
adjournment thereof. Presence at the meeting of a stockholder who has signed a
proxy but does not duly revoke it or request to vote in person does not revoke
that proxy.
 
  IF THE RESTRUCTURING TRANSACTIONS AND THE OTHER TRANSACTIONS COMPRISING THE
REIT CONVERSION DO NOT OCCUR IN TIME FOR HOST REIT TO ELECT REIT STATUS
EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 1999, THE EFFECTIVENESS OF HOST REIT'S ELECTION COULD BE
DELAYED TO JANUARY 1, 2000, WHICH WOULD RESULT IN HOST OR HOST REIT CONTINUING
TO PAY SUBSTANTIAL CORPORATE-LEVEL INCOME TAXES IN 1999 AND COULD CAUSE THE
BLACKSTONE ACQUISITION NOT TO BE CONSUMMATED. THEREFORE, IT IS EXTREMELY
IMPORTANT THAT STOCKHOLDERS RETURN THE PROXY CARDS AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. ANY
DELAY IN RETURNING PROXIES COULD CAUSE THE SPECIAL MEETING TO BE DELAYED,
WHICH COULD PREVENT THE RESTRUCTURING TRANSACTIONS AND THE OTHER TRANSACTIONS
COMPRISING THE REIT CONVERSION FROM BEING EFFECTIVE JANUARY 1, 1999.
 
SOLICITATION OF PROXIES AND EXPENSES
 
  The solicitation of proxies for the Special Meeting is being made by the
Board of Directors of Host and will be done principally by mail. Host will
bear the entire cost of solicitation of proxies from Host's stockholders and
of preparing, assembling, printing and mailing this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus, the proxy and any additional information furnished to
Host's stockholders. Copies of solicitation materials will be furnished to
brokerage houses, banks, fiduciaries and other custodians or nominees holding
in their names shares of Host Common Stock beneficially owned by others to
forward to such beneficial owners. Host may reimburse persons representing
owners of shares of Host Common Stock for their expenses in forwarding
solicitation materials to such beneficial owners. Original solicitation of
proxies by mail may be supplemented by telephone, telegram or personal
solicitation by directors, officers or other regular employees of Host. In
addition, Host has engaged       to furnish solicitation services on its
behalf. No additional compensation will be paid to directors, officers or
 
                                      47

<PAGE>
 
other regular employees for such services, but       will be paid a fee for
its services, estimated to be approximately $   , plus reimbursement of its
expenses.
 
  HOST'S STOCKHOLDERS SHOULD NOT SEND ANY STOCK CERTIFICATES WITH THEIR PROXY
CARDS.
 
  THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF HOST HAS DETERMINED THE RESTRUCTURING TRANSACTIONS
TO BE ADVISABLE FOR HOST AND ITS STOCKHOLDERS. ACCORDINGLY, THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS HAS APPROVED THE AGREEMENT AND THE TRANSACTIONS CONTEMPLATED THEREBY
AND RECOMMENDS THAT ALL STOCKHOLDERS VOTE "FOR" APPROVAL OF THE AGREEMENT AND
THE TRANSACTIONS CONTEMPLATED THEREBY.
 
                                      48

<PAGE>
 
                        THE RESTRUCTURING TRANSACTIONS
 
  The following summary of the terms of the Restructuring Transactions is
qualified in its entirety by reference to the Agreement, a copy of which is
attached as Appendix A to this Proxy Statement/Prospectus and is incorporated
by reference into this Proxy Statement/Prospectus. Stockholders of Host are
urged to review the Agreement in its entirety.
 
BACKGROUND AND REASONS FOR THE RESTRUCTURING TRANSACTIONS AND THE REIT
CONVERSION
 
  Host is proposing the Restructuring Transactions in connection with a plan
adopted by Host to restructure its business operations so that it will qualify
as a REIT under the Code. If the Agreement is approved by Host stockholders at
the Special Meeting and the Restructuring Transactions are consummated, Host
REIT expects to qualify as a REIT beginning with its first full taxable year
commencing after the REIT Conversion is completed, which currently is expected
to be the year commencing January 1, 1999. The Host Board of Directors is
proposing the Restructuring Transactions primarily for the following reasons:
 
  . The Restructuring Transactions are essential components of Host's
    conversion to REIT status for federal income tax purposes. In particular,
    the OP Contribution will enable Host REIT, following the Merger, to
    operate, together with the Operating Partnership, in an UPREIT structure,
    through which Host REIT would continue the full-service hotel ownership
    business currently conducted by Host. Host believes that the UPREIT
    structure will improve its ability to acquire additional properties in
    the future on favorable terms. Specifically, under certain circumstances,
    OP Units could be issued to acquire properties in transactions that would
    not trigger immediate tax obligations for certain sellers. Accordingly,
    converting to an UPREIT structure could enable Host REIT to acquire
    hotels and other properties in the future at lower prices because of the
    tax advantages to some sellers of receiving OP Units as consideration.
    OP Units would subsequently be redeemable for cash or common stock of
    Host REIT (at the option of Host REIT) at such time as the recipient
    desires liquidity.
 
  . The provisions of Maryland law have generally been viewed as favorable to
    REITs organized in corporate or trust form, as evidenced by the large
    number of publicly-traded REITs that have chosen to operate as a regular
    Maryland corporation or as a special statutory Maryland real estate
    investment trust. According to NAREIT, as of September 1998, there were
    over 100 publicly-traded REITs organized under Maryland law.
 
  . In order to satisfy certain requirements that are applicable to REITs in
    general, many REITs impose ownership limits and transfer restrictions,
    similar to the Ownership Limit under Host REIT's Charter, by inclusion of
    such provisions in their charters. Under Delaware law, such restrictions
    would not be binding with respect to securities issued prior to adoption
    of the restriction unless holders of such securities agree to or vote in
    favor of such restriction. However, under Maryland law and by reason of
    the Merger, all shares of Host REIT Common Stock issued in the Merger and
    thereafter would be subject to the Ownership Limit, for which express
    statutory authority exists under Maryland law.
 
  . Host's principal executive offices and a substantial number of Host's
    employees are employed in Maryland.
 
  The Board of Directors of Host believes that the Restructuring Transactions
and the other transactions comprising the REIT Conversion are advisable for
Host and its stockholders based on the belief that:
 
  . The REIT structure, as a more tax efficient structure, will provide
    improved operating results through changing economic conditions and all
    phases of the hotel economic cycle.
 
  . The REIT Conversion, which will reduce corporate-level taxes and the need
    to incur debt to reduce corporate-level taxes through interest
    deductions, will improve its financial flexibility and allow it to
    continue to strengthen its balance sheet by reducing its overall debt to
    equity ratio over time.
 
 
                                      49

<PAGE>
 
  . As a REIT, Host will be able to compete more effectively with other
    public lodging real estate companies that already are organized as REITs
    and to make performance comparisons with its peers more meaningful.
 
  . By becoming a dividend paying company, Host's stockholder base will
    expand to include investors attracted by yield as well as asset quality.
 
  . The adoption of the UPREIT structure will facilitate tax-deferred
    acquisition of additional hotels (such as in the case of the Blackstone
    Acquisition and the Partnership Mergers).
 
  Host explored the possibility of engaging in a business combination with a
so-called "paired share" REIT, Santa Anita, in December 1996 and January 1997.
Based upon an analysis of potential costs, the pricing of the transaction, the
time requirement to complete such a transaction and the possible legislative
risks associated with the "paired share" structure, Host decided not to pursue
such a transaction. During the fourth quarter of 1997, Host began to explore
internally the possibility of reorganizing as a REIT on a stand-alone basis.
In April 1998, Host decided that it would be advantageous for its
stockholders, as discussed in the following paragraphs, if Host were to
convert to a REIT.
 
  The Host Board believes that Host's conversion to a REIT and the
distribution of Crestline shares as part of the Initial E&P Distribution will
benefit Host's stockholders by providing them with a tax advantaged REIT
security that is expected to provide both the opportunity for regular cash
dividends and capital appreciation as Host REIT acquires additional
properties, as well as a continuing interest in Crestline, Host's senior
living company and the initial lessee of substantially all of Host REIT's
hotels, if a Host stockholder so desires. If Host REIT qualifies for taxation
as a REIT, it generally will not be subject to federal corporate income taxes
on that portion of its ordinary income or capital gain that is distributed to
stockholders. As a REIT, Host REIT would be able to benefit from the tax
advantages that apply to REIT's, and stockholders will receive quarterly
distributions that are at least sufficient to satisfy the annual distribution
requirements applicable to REITs under the Code. The Host Board believes that
this will highlight the value of Host REIT's hotel properties and permit
stockholders to realize a regular cash return on that value. Upon completion
of the REIT Conversion, Crestline is expected to own Host's 31 senior living
communities, which will continue to be managed by Marriott International, and
a 25% interest in the Swissotel management company expected to be acquired in
the Blackstone Acquisition, and will lease substantially all of the hotels
owned by Host REIT and its affiliates. At such time, Crestline will operate
independently of Host, will be publicly traded and separately listed on the
NYSE, and will pursue its own growth opportunities.
 
  Following the Restructuring Transactions and the other transactions
comprising the REIT Conversion (including the Blackstone Acquisition), Host
REIT and its subsidiaries are expected initially to own outright, or have
controlling interests in, approximately 125 full-service hotels operated
primarily under the Marriott, Ritz-Carlton, Four Seasons, Swissotel and Hyatt
brand names. Upon completion of the REIT Conversion, Host REIT will be the
sole general partner of the Operating Partnership and is expected to own
approximately 76% of the OP Units in the Operating Partnership, and the
remaining OP Units, which are intended to be substantially equivalent on an
economic basis to shares of Host REIT Common Stock, will be owned by the
Limited Partners, unaffiliated partners of the Private Partnerships and the
Blackstone Entities. Host REIT and its subsidiaries will own a number of OP
Units equal to the number of shares of Host REIT Common Stock outstanding.
Host REIT will be managed by its Board of Directors and will have no employees
who are not also employees of the Operating Partnership.
 
  ACCORDINGLY, THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF HOST BELIEVES THAT THE RESTRUCTURING
TRANSACTIONS ARE ADVISABLE FOR HOST AND ITS STOCKHOLDERS AND RECOMMENDS THAT
STOCKHOLDERS VOTE "FOR" APPROVAL OF THE AGREEMENT AND THE TRANSACTIONS
CONTEMPLATED THEREBY. In the event the Agreement is not approved by Host
stockholders at the Special Meeting, Host will continue to operate as a
Delaware corporation, and the other transactions comprising the REIT
Conversion will not be completed.
 
 
                                      50

<PAGE>
 
THE OP CONTRIBUTION
 
  As a preliminary step in the REIT Conversion, during 1998, various
subsidiaries of Host will be contributing and, subject to approval of the
Agreement at the Special Meeting, after the Special Meeting Host will
contribute (as the OP Contribution) the wholly-owned full-service hotel assets
held by such entities, certain interests in the Partnerships and the Private
Partnerships (other than their interests in the general partners, each of
which is Host or a wholly-owned direct or indirect subsidiary of Host, who
will remain in existence as subsidiaries of Host REIT and will receive OP
Units in the Partnership Mergers) and certain of their other assets (excluding
Host's senior living assets and the cash and any other consideration to be
distributed in connection with the Initial E&P Distribution, and certain de
minimis assets that cannot be contributed to the Operating Partnership) to the
Operating Partnership in exchange for (i) a number of OP Units equal to the
number of outstanding shares of Host Common Stock at the time of the REIT
Conversion (reduced by the number of OP Units to be received by the general
partners of the Partnerships and other subsidiaries of Host in the Partnership
Mergers), (ii) preferred partnership interests in the Operating Partnership
corresponding to any shares of Host preferred stock outstanding at the time of
the REIT Conversion and (iii) the assumption by the Operating Partnership of
all liabilities of Host (including past and future contingent liabilities and
liabilities for the Plans in accordance with the 1998 Employee Benefits
Allocation Agreement), other than liabilities of Crestline. Following these
contributions, the Operating Partnership and its subsidiaries will directly or
indirectly own all of Host's and its subsidiaries' wholly-owned hotels,
substantially all of Host's direct and indirect interests in the Partnerships
and the Private Partnerships and all of Host's other assets (excluding its
senior living assets and the cash and any other consideration to be
distributed in connection with the Initial E&P Distribution, and certain de
minimis assets that cannot be contributed to the Operating Partnership).
 
  The above-described contributions, which include the OP Contribution, will
enable Host REIT, following the Reincorporation by means of the Merger, to
operate together with the Operating Partnership in an UPREIT structure, which
is expected to improve Host REIT's ability to acquire additional hotels and
other properties in the future on favorable terms.
 
TERMS OF THE MERGER
 
  The Reincorporation will be effected through the merger of Host with and
into Host REIT. As a result of the Merger, Host REIT will be the surviving
entity and the separate existence of Host will terminate. At the Effective
Time, each outstanding share of Host Common Stock, together with the
associated Host Right, will be converted into one share of Host REIT Common
Stock and holders thereof will become subject to the Ownership Limit under the
Host REIT Charter. In addition, certain rights and obligations of Host under
the Plans and related and other option agreements will be assumed by Host
REIT, and all rights of the parties thereto and the participants therein to
acquire shares of Host Common Stock on the terms and conditions of the Plans
and such option agreements will be converted into rights to acquire shares of
Host REIT Common Stock in accordance with the 1998 Employee Benefits
Allocation Agreement. See "Description of Host REIT Capital Stock" and
"Management--1998 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement."
 
  As a consequence of the Merger, among other things, the assets of Host will
become assets of Host REIT without further action, and Host REIT will become
liable for all the debts and obligations of Host. As soon as practicable
following the Merger, Host REIT will complete any other transactions
comprising the REIT Conversion that have not already been completed. See "The
REIT Conversion."
 
  Following the Merger, each person who was a director of Host will continue
as a director of Host REIT and certain of the officers of Host will remain
officers of Host REIT (others will have become officers of Crestline in
connection with the distribution of Crestline shares as part of the Initial
E&P Distribution). Certain information about each person who currently is a
member of the Board of Directors and an executive officer of Host is set forth
herein under the caption "Management--Directors, Executive Officers and Key
Employees of Host REIT." In addition, upon consummation of the Merger, Host
REIT and its stockholders will be governed by the MGCL and by the Host REIT
Charter and Host REIT Bylaws, copies of which are attached as Exhibits A and
 
                                      51

<PAGE>
 
B, respectively, to the Agreement, which is attached to this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus as Appendix A. See "--Comparison of Rights of
Stockholders of Host and Host REIT."
 
  PRIMARILY TO SATISFY CERTAIN REQUIREMENTS UNDER THE CODE THAT ARE APPLICABLE
TO REITS IN GENERAL, THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT WILL PROVIDE THAT NO PERSON OR
PERSONS ACTING AS A GROUP MAY OWN, OR BE DEEMED TO OWN BY VIRTUE OF THE
ATTRIBUTION PROVISIONS OF THE CODE, MORE THAN (I) 9.8% OF THE LESSER OF THE
NUMBER OR VALUE OF SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK OUTSTANDING OR (II) 9.8%
OF THE LESSER OF THE NUMBER OR VALUE OF THE ISSUED AND OUTSTANDING SHARES OF
ANY CLASS OR SERIES OF HOST REIT PREFERRED STOCK, SUBJECT TO WAIVER OR
MODIFICATION BY HOST REIT IN CERTAIN LIMITED CIRCUMSTANCES AND SUBJECT TO (A)
AN EXCEPTION FOR A HOLDER OF SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK SOLELY BY REASON
OF THE MERGER SO LONG AS SUCH HOLDER WOULD NOT OWN, DIRECTLY OR BY ATTRIBUTION
UNDER THE CODE, MORE THAN 9.8% BY VALUE OF THE OUTSTANDING CAPITAL STOCK OF
HOST REIT AFTER THE MERGER, AND (B) A LIMITATION ON THE APPLICATION OF THE
"GROUP" LIMITATION (BUT NO OTHER ELEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT) TO ANY
"GROUP" THAT OTHERWISE WOULD EXCEED THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT AT THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT
EFFECTIVE TIME SOLELY BY REASON OF ITS STATUS AS A "GROUP". THE OWNERSHIP
LIMIT WILL BECOME APPLICABLE TO ALL HOST REIT STOCKHOLDERS AS OF THE OWNERSHIP
LIMIT EFFECTIVE TIME. ANY SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK HELD AT, OR
ACQUIRED OR OTHERWISE HELD AT ANY TIME AFTER, THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT EFFECTIVE
TIME IN VIOLATION OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT WILL BE TRANSFERRED AUTOMATICALLY TO
A TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT OF A DESIGNATED CHARITABLE BENEFICIARY, AND THE PERSON
WHO ACQUIRED (OR HELD) SUCH EXCESS SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK WILL NOT
BE ENTITLED TO ANY DISTRIBUTIONS THEREON OR TO VOTE SUCH EXCESS SHARES OF HOST
REIT COMMON STOCK. IF EXCESS SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK ARE HELD AS OF
THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT EFFECTIVE TIME, THE HOLDER OF SUCH EXCESS SHARES OF HOST
REIT COMMON STOCK WILL RECEIVE THE LESSER OF THE VALUE OF SUCH EXCESS SHARES
AS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT EFFECTIVE TIME OR THE CASH PROCEEDS OF THE SALE OF
SUCH EXCESS SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK BY THE TRUSTEE OF THE TRUST.
THEREAFTER, ANY PERSON WHO ACQUIRES HOST REIT COMMON STOCK IN EXCESS OF THE
OWNERSHIP LIMIT WILL NOT RECEIVE ANY PROCEEDS FROM THE SUBSEQUENT SALE THEREOF
IN EXCESS OF THE LESSER OF THE PRICE PAID THEREFOR OR THE AMOUNT REALIZED FROM
SUCH SALE. A TRANSFER OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK TO A PERSON WHO, AS A RESULT
OF THE TRANSFER, VIOLATES THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT MAY BE VOID UNDER CERTAIN
CIRCUMSTANCES, AND, IN ANY EVENT, WOULD DENY THE TRANSFEREE ANY OF THE
ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF OWNING SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK IN EXCESS OF THE
OWNERSHIP LIMIT. TO AVOID THE ADVERSE EFFECTS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT, ANY
HOLDER OF HOST COMMON STOCK WHO WOULD OWN SHARES IN EXCESS OF THE OWNERSHIP
LIMIT AS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT EFFECTIVE TIME SHOULD DISPOSE OF ANY SUCH
EXCESS SHARES PRIOR THERETO.
 
  Host anticipates that the Merger will become effective as promptly as
practicable following stockholder approval of the Agreement at the Special
Meeting and satisfaction or waiver of the other conditions to the Merger. The
Agreement provides that the Merger may be abandoned by Host or Host REIT at
any time prior to its effectiveness. Host has no current intention of
abandoning or causing Host REIT to abandon the Merger subsequent to the
Special Meeting if stockholder approval is obtained and the other conditions
to the Merger are satisfied or waived. See "--Conditions to the Restructuring
Transactions."
 
  The Board of Directors of Host has approved the Agreement, and the
transactions contemplated thereby, subject to stockholder approval. Assuming
the stockholders of Host approve the Agreement at the Special Meeting and the
other conditions to the Merger are satisfied or waived, the Merger will become
effective at the time the Articles of Merger are accepted for filing (or later
if so specified in the Articles of Merger) by the SDAT in accordance with the
MGCL and in compliance with the DGCL. It is expected that the listing of Host
REIT Common Stock on the NYSE will occur at or prior to the Effective Time and
that the listing of Host Common Stock on the NYSE will be terminated at the
Effective Time.
 
  At the Effective Time, each certificate representing shares of Host Common
Stock will be deemed for all purposes to evidence the same number of shares of
Host REIT Common Stock. As soon as reasonably practicable after the Effective
Time, Host REIT will instruct First Chicago Trust Company of New York, the
transfer agent and registrar for Host REIT Common Stock (the "Transfer
Agent"), to mail a letter of transmittal and instructions to each holder of a
certificate or certificates which immediately prior to the Effective Time
represented outstanding shares of Host Common Stock ("Certificates"), advising
the securityholder of the
 
                                      52

<PAGE>
 
procedure for surrendering the Certificates in exchange for certificates
representing shares of Host REIT Common Stock. Upon surrender of the
Certificates for cancellation to the Transfer Agent, together with a duly
executed letter of transmittal and such other documents as may be reasonably
required by the Transfer Agent or the Agreement, the holder of the
Certificates will be entitled to receive in exchange therefor a certificate
evidencing that number of shares of Host REIT Common Stock which such holder
has the right to receive in respect of the rights formerly evidenced by such
certificates. CERTIFICATES SHOULD NOT BE SURRENDERED UNTIL THE LETTER OF
TRANSMITTAL IS RECEIVED.
 
  Neither Host nor Host REIT is aware of any federal, state or local
regulatory requirements that must be complied with or approvals that must be
obtained prior to consummation of the Merger pursuant to the Agreement, other
than compliance with applicable federal and state securities laws, the filing
and acceptance for record of the Articles of Merger by the SDAT as required
under the MGCL and in compliance with the DGCL and the receipt of various
state and local governmental authorizations.
 
ABSENCE OF DISSENTERS' RIGHTS
 
  Pursuant to Section 262(b)(1) of the DGCL, the stockholders of Host will not
be entitled to appraisal rights as a result of the Merger or other
Restructuring Transactions.
 
ACCOUNTING TREATMENT
 
  The OP Contribution and the Merger will be accounted for as a transfer or
exchange between enterprises under common control. Therefore, the assets and
liabilities so transferred will be accounted for at historical cost in a
manner similar to that in pooling-of-interests accounting.
 
CONDITIONS TO THE RESTRUCTURING TRANSACTIONS
 
  Consummation of the Restructuring Transactions is subject to the
satisfaction or waiver of various conditions, including the following:
 
  . Host Stockholder Approval. The affirmative vote of the holders of Host
    Common Stock representing not less than two-thirds (66 2/3%) of the
    outstanding shares of Host Common Stock shall have approved the
    Agreement, which shall be deemed to be approval of the Merger for
    purposes of Section 251 of the DGCL (applicable to mergers), as well as
    approval of the OP Contribution for purposes of Section 271 of the DGCL
    (applicable to the sale, lease or exchange of all or substantially all of
    the assets of a corporation) if such OP Contribution were deemed to
    constitute a sale, lease or exchange of all or substantially all of the
    assets of Host.
 
  . REIT Qualification. Host's Board of Directors shall have determined, (i)
    that the transactions constituting the REIT Conversion which impact Host
    REIT's status as a REIT for federal income tax purposes have occurred or
    are reasonably likely to occur, and (ii) based upon the advice of
    counsel, that Host REIT can elect to be treated as a REIT for federal
    income tax purposes effective no later than the first full taxable year
    commencing after the REIT Conversion is completed.
 
  . NYSE Listing. The Host REIT Common Stock shall have been approved for
    listing on the NYSE.
 
  . Third-Party Consents. Host shall have received all governmental and
    third-party consents to the Restructuring Transactions, including
    consents of lenders and Marriott International, except for consents as
    would not reasonably be expected to have a material adverse effect on the
    business, financial condition or results of operations of Host REIT, the
    Operating Partnership and their subsidiaries taken as a whole.
 
  . No Adverse Tax Legislation. The United States Congress shall not have
    enacted legislation, or proposed legislation with a reasonable
    possibility of being enacted, that would have the effect of (i)
    substantially impairing the ability of Host REIT to qualify as a REIT or
    the Operating Partnership to qualify as a partnership, (ii) substantially
    increasing the federal tax liabilities of Host REIT resulting from the
    REIT Conversion or (iii) substantially reducing the expected benefits to
    Host REIT resulting from the REIT
 
                                      53

<PAGE>
 
   Conversion. The determination that this condition has been satisfied will
   be made by Host, in its discretion.
 
COMPARISON OF RIGHTS OF STOCKHOLDERS OF HOST AND HOST REIT
 
  The rights of stockholders of Host are currently governed by the DGCL, the
Host Certificate, the Host Bylaws and the Host Rights Agreement. If the
Agreement is approved by Host's stockholders and the Merger is consummated,
Host REIT will be the surviving entity in the Merger and the rights of the
stockholders of Host REIT will be governed by the MGCL, the Host REIT Charter,
the Host REIT Bylaws and Host REIT's Stockholder Rights Plan. The following
discussion compares certain of the existing rights of stockholders of Host
with those of stockholders of Host REIT.
 
  FORM OF ORGANIZATION AND PURPOSE
 
  Host. Host is a Delaware corporation. Pursuant to the Host Certificate, Host
is authorized to engage in any lawful acts or activities for which
corporations may be organized under the DGCL, including conducting a general
hotel business.
 
  Host REIT. Host REIT is a Maryland corporation and will be the sole general
partner of the Operating Partnership. Host REIT will make an election to be
taxed as a REIT under the Code and intends to maintain its qualification as a
REIT. Host REIT's only significant asset will be its interest in the Operating
Partnership and consequently an indirect investment in the hotels owned by the
Operating Partnership and its subsidiaries.
 
  CAPITALIZATION
 
  Host. The Host Certificate authorizes a total of 301,000,000 shares of stock
consisting of 300,000,000 shares of Host Common Stock, par value $1.00 per
share, and 1,000,000 shares of Host preferred stock without par value ("Host
Preferred Stock"). Of the Host Preferred Stock, 300,000 shares are designated
as Series A Junior Participating Preferred Stock without par value, and 4,000
shares are designated as Series A Cumulative Convertible Preferred Stock
without par value. At September 28, 1998, Host had 204,586,035 shares of Host
Common Stock issued and outstanding and no shares of Host Preferred Stock
issued and outstanding.
 
  Host REIT. The Host REIT Charter provides that the total number of shares of
stock of all classes which Host REIT has authority to issue is 800,000,000
shares of stock, initially consisting of 750,000,000 shares of Host REIT
Common Stock, par value $.01 per share, and 50,000,000 shares of Host REIT
Preferred Stock, par value $.01 per share. The Board of Directors is
authorized, without a vote of stockholders, to classify or reclassify any
unissued shares of stock and to establish the preferences and rights of any
preferred or other class or series of stock to be issued. At September 28,
1998, 100 shares of Host REIT Common Stock were issued and outstanding.
 
  PREEMPTIVE RIGHTS
 
  DGCL. Under the DGCL, stockholders of a corporation have only such
preemptive rights as may be provided in the corporation's certificate of
incorporation.
 
  Host. The Host Certificate does not provide for preemptive rights.
 
  MGCL. Under the MGCL, stockholders of a Maryland corporation have only such
preemptive rights as may be provided in the Maryland corporation's charter.
 
  Host REIT. The Host REIT Charter does not provide for preemptive rights.
 
 
                                      54

<PAGE>
 
  RESTRICTIONS ON OWNERSHIP AND TRANSFER OF STOCK
 
  DGCL. Under the DGCL, a written restriction on the transfer of a security,
if permitted by the DGCL and noted conspicuously on the certificate
representing the security or, in the case of uncertificated shares, contained
in the notice required to be sent to the security holder pursuant to the DGCL,
may be enforced against the holder or any successor or transferee of the
holder. A restriction on the transfer of securities of a corporation may be
imposed either by the certificate of incorporation or by the by-laws or by an
agreement among any number of security holders or among such holders and the
corporation. No restriction so imposed is binding with respect to securities
issued prior to adoption of the restriction unless the holders of the
securities are parties to an agreement or voted in favor of the restriction. A
restriction on the transfer of securities of a corporation is permitted under
the DGCL if, among other things, it prohibits the transfer of the restricted
securities to designated persons or classes of persons, and such designation
is not manifestly unreasonable. Any other lawful restriction on the transfer
of securities also is permitted under the DGCL. The DGCL expressly provides
that any restriction on the transfer of shares imposed for the purpose of
maintaining a tax advantage to the corporation is conclusively presumed to be
for a reasonable purpose.
 
  Host. Neither the Host Certificate nor the Host Bylaws provides for
restrictions on the transfer of Host securities.
 
  MGCL. Under the MGCL, a Maryland corporation may impose a restriction on the
transfer of its stock in the corporation's charter, articles of incorporation
or by-laws. If a Maryland corporation which issues stock imposes a restriction
on its transferability, the stock certificate must (i) contain a full
statement of the restriction, or (ii) state that the corporation will furnish
information about the restriction to the stockholder on request and without
charge. The MGCL expressly authorizes the charter of a Maryland corporation to
provide for restrictions on transferability designed to permit a corporation
to qualify as a REIT under the Code or for any other purpose.
 
  Host REIT. The Ownership Limit under the Host REIT Charter, subject to
certain exceptions, provides that no person or persons acting as a group may
own, or be deemed to own by virtue of the attribution provisions of the Code,
more than (i) 9.8% of the lesser of the number or value of shares of Host REIT
Common Stock outstanding (subject to an exception for Host Common Stock held
prior to the REIT Conversion so long as the holder thereof would not own more
than 9.8% in value of the outstanding shares of capital stock of Host REIT) or
(ii) 9.8% of the lesser of the number or value of the issued and outstanding
preferred or other stock of any class or series of Host REIT. The Host REIT
Charter further prohibits (a) any person from actually or constructively
owning shares of the capital stock of Host REIT that would result in Host REIT
being "closely held" under Section 856(h) of the Code or otherwise cause Host
REIT to fail to qualify as a REIT and (b) any person from transferring shares
of Host REIT Common Stock or Host REIT Preferred Stock if such transfer would
result in shares of Host REIT Common Stock or Host REIT Preferred Stock being
owned by fewer than 100 persons. See "Description of Host REIT Capital Stock--
Restrictions on Ownership and Transfer."
 
  AMENDMENT OF HOST CERTIFICATE/HOST REIT CHARTER
 
  DGCL. Under the DGCL, an amendment to a corporation's certificate of
incorporation generally requires the approval of the board of directors and
the approval of a majority of the outstanding stock entitled to vote thereon
and a majority of the outstanding stock of each class entitled to vote
thereon. Under the DGCL, the holders of the outstanding shares of a class are
entitled to vote as a separate class on a proposed amendment that would
increase or decrease the aggregate number of authorized shares of such class,
increase or decrease the par value of the shares of such class or alter or
change the powers, preferences or special rights of the shares of such class
so as to affect them adversely. If any proposed amendment would alter or
change the powers, preferences or special rights of one or more series of any
class so as to affect them adversely, but would not so affect the entire
class, then only the shares of the series so affected by the amendment will be
considered a separate class for purposes of voting by classes.
 
  Host. The Host Certificate provides that, unless otherwise specified by the
Host Certificate, Host reserves the right to amend, alter, change or repeal
any provision contained in the Host Certificate in the manner prescribed by
the DGCL.
 
 
                                      55

<PAGE>
 
  The Host Certificate provides further that the affirmative vote of at least
66 2/3% of the voting power of all the shares of the corporation entitled to
vote generally in the election of directors ("Voting Stock") is required to
alter, amend or repeal, or to adopt any provisions inconsistent with certain
provisions in the Host Certificate relating to, among other things: the number
and election of Host Directors, the removal of Host Directors, vacancies on
the Host Board, the voting requirements for specified business combinations,
stockholder action by written consent, special stockholder meetings, the
amendment of the Host Bylaws, and the voting requirements for certain
"interested stockholder" transactions. See "--Number and Election of
Directors," "--Removal of Directors," "--Vacancies on the Board of Directors,"
"--Changes in Control Pursuant to Delaware/Maryland Law," "--Transactions
Involving Officers or Directors," "--Stockholder Action by Written Consent,"
"--Special Stockholder Meetings," and "Amendment of Bylaws."
 
  MGCL. Under the MGCL, in order to amend the charter, the board of directors
first must adopt a resolution setting forth the proposed amendment and
declaring its advisability and direct that the proposed amendment be submitted
to stockholders for their consideration either at an annual or special meeting
of stockholders. Thereafter, the proposed amendment must be approved by
stockholders by the affirmative vote of two-thirds of all the votes entitled
to be cast on the matter, unless a greater or lesser proportion of votes (but
not less than a majority of all votes entitled to be cast) is specified in the
charter.
 
  Host REIT. The provisions contained in the Host REIT Charter relating to
restrictions on transferability of Host REIT Common Stock, the classified
Board and fixing the size of the Board within the range set forth in the Host
REIT Charter, as well as the provisions relating to removal of directors, the
filling of Board vacancies, the exclusive authority of the Board to amend the
Bylaws and other constituencies that may be considered in determining the
advisability of mergers, consolidations, share exchanges and transfers of
assets and other business combinations involving Host REIT, may be amended
only by a resolution adopted by the Board of Directors and approved at an
annual or special meeting of the stockholders by the affirmative vote of the
holders of not less than two-thirds of the votes entitled to be cast on the
matter. Other amendments to the Host REIT Charter may be effected by requisite
action of the Board of Directors and approval by stockholders by the
affirmative vote of not less than a majority of the votes entitled to be cast
on the matter.
 
  AMENDMENT OF BYLAWS
 
  DGCL. Under the DGCL, an amendment to a corporation's by-laws requires the
approval of the stockholders, unless the certificate of incorporation confers
the power to amend the by-laws upon the board of directors. Even if the power
to adopt, amend or repeal the by-laws is conferred upon the board of
directors, the stockholders may not be divested of the power to adopt, amend
or repeal the by-laws.
 
  Host. Subject to the exceptions described below, the Host Certificate
provides that the Host Board of Directors is authorized to make, alter, amend
and repeal the Host Bylaws (except insofar as the Host Bylaws adopted by the
shareholders shall otherwise provide). Any by-laws made by the Board of
Directors may be altered, amended or repealed by the directors or by the
stockholders. The Host Bylaws provide that, subject to the exceptions
described below, the Host Bylaws may be altered, amended or repealed (a) by a
majority vote of the shares represented and entitled to vote at any regular
meeting of the stockholders (or at any special meeting called for that
purpose), or (b) subject to Delaware law, by a majority vote of those
directors present at any meeting at which a quorum of the Board of Directors
is present.
 
  The Host Certificate and/or the Host Bylaws provides that certain provisions
in the Host Bylaws may not be altered, amended or repealed, and no provision
inconsistent therewith adopted, without the affirmative vote of the holders of
at least 66 2/3% of the Voting Stock, including provisions relating to, among
other things: the number and election of Host directors; vacancies on the
Board of Directors and the removal of directors from the Host Board; director
nominations; notice to directors and stockholders; bylaw amendments; and the
prohibition on stockholder action by written consent. See "--Number and
Election of Directors," "--Vacancies on the Board of Directors," "--Removal of
Directors" and "--Stockholder Action by Written Consent."
 
 
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  MGCL. Under the MGCL, an amendment to a Maryland corporation's by-laws
requires the approval of the stockholders, unless the charter or by-laws
confer the power to amend the by-laws upon the board of directors.
 
  Host REIT. As permitted under the MGCL, the Host REIT Charter and Bylaws
provide that directors have the exclusive right to amend the Host REIT Bylaws.
 
  STOCKHOLDER VOTING RIGHTS GENERALLY
 
  DGCL. Under the DGCL, the affirmative vote of the majority of shares present
in person or represented by proxy at a duly held meeting at which a quorum is
present and entitled to vote on the subject matter is deemed to be the act of
the stockholders, unless the DGCL, the certificate of incorporation or the by-
laws specify a different voting requirement.
 
  Host. The Host Bylaws provide that in all matters, when a quorum is present
at any meeting, the vote of the holders of a majority of the stock having
voting power present in person or represented by proxy shall decide any
question brought before such meeting, unless the question is one upon which by
express provision of the statutes or of the Host Certificate, a different vote
is required in which case such express provision shall govern and control the
decision of such question. The Host Bylaws also provide that each stockholder
shall at every meeting of the stockholders be entitled to one vote in person
or by proxy for each share of the capital stock having voting power held by
such stockholder, but no proxy shall be voted on after three years from its
date, unless the proxy provides for a longer period. Each share of Host Common
Stock has one vote and Host's Certificate of Incorporation permits the Board
of Directors to classify and issue shares of capital stock in one or more
series having voting power which may differ from that of the Common Stock.
 
  MGCL. Under the MGCL, unless the MGCL or charter specify a different voting
requirement, a majority of all the votes cast at a duly held meeting at which
a quorum is present and entitled to vote on the subject matter is deemed to be
the act of the stockholders. Additionally, unless the MGCL or charter provide
otherwise, if two or more classes of stock are entitled to vote separately on
any matter for which the MGCL requires approval by two-thirds of all the votes
entitled to be cast, the matter must be approved by two-thirds of all the
votes of each class.
 
  Host REIT. Each share of Host REIT Common Stock will have one vote and Host
REIT's Charter permits the Board of Directors to classify and issue shares of
capital stock in one or more classes or series having voting power which may
differ from that of the shares of Host REIT Common Stock.
 
  STOCKHOLDER ACTION BY WRITTEN CONSENT
 
  DGCL. Under the DGCL, unless otherwise provided in a corporation's
certificate of incorporation, any action that may be taken at any annual or
special meeting of stockholders may be taken without a meeting, without prior
notice and without a vote, if a consent (or consents) in writing, setting
forth the action so taken, shall be signed by the holders of outstanding stock
having not less than the minimum number of votes that would be necessary to
authorize or take such action at a meeting at which all shares entitled to
vote thereon were present and voted and shall be delivered to the corporation.
 
  Host. The Host Certificate and Host Bylaws provide that any action required
or permitted to be taken by the stockholders of the corporation must be
effected at a duly called annual or special meeting of such holders and may
not be effected by any consent in writing by such holders.
 
  MGCL. Under the MGCL, any action required or permitted to be taken at a
meeting of stockholders may be taken without a meeting if the following are
filed with the records of stockholder meetings: (i) an unanimous written
consent which sets forth the action and is signed by each stockholder entitled
to vote on the matter; and (ii) a written waiver of any right to dissent
signed by each stockholder entitled to notice of the meeting but not entitled
to vote at it.
 
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<PAGE>
 
  Host REIT. Pursuant to the MGCL and Host REIT Bylaws, any action required or
permitted to be taken by the stockholders must be effected at a duly called
annual or special meeting of stockholders and may not be effected by any
consent in writing by stockholders, unless such consent is unanimous.
 
  SPECIAL STOCKHOLDER MEETINGS
 
  DGCL. Under the DGCL, special meetings of the stockholders may be called by
the board of directors or by such person or persons as may be authorized by
the certificate of incorporation or by the bylaws.
 
  Host. The Host Certificate provides that except as required by law, special
meetings of stockholders of the corporation may be called only by the Board of
Directors pursuant to a resolution approved by a majority of the entire Board
of Directors.
 
  MGCL. Under the MGCL, a special meeting of a Maryland corporation's
stockholders may be called by (i) the president, (ii) the board of directors,
or (iii) any other person specified in the charter or the by-laws. The MGCL
further provides that the secretary of a Maryland corporation shall call a
special meeting of the stockholders on the written request of stockholders
entitled to cast at least 25% of all the votes entitled to be cast at the
meeting, unless a Maryland corporation includes in its charter or by-laws a
provision that requires the written request of stockholders entitled to cast a
greater or lesser percentage of all votes entitled to be cast at the meeting,
except that in no event shall the percentage provided for in the charter or
by-laws be greater than a majority of all the votes entitled to be cast at the
meeting. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the MGCL provides that unless
requested by stockholders entitled to cast a majority of all the votes
entitled to be cast at the meeting, a special meeting need not be called to
consider any matter which is substantially the same as a matter voted on at
any special meeting of the stockholders held during the preceding 12 months.
 
  Host REIT. The Host REIT Charter and Bylaws provide that special meetings of
the stockholders may be called by the President or the Board of Directors of
Host REIT. The Secretary of Host REIT also is required to call a special
meeting of the stockholders on the written request of stockholders entitled to
cast a majority of all the votes entitled to be cast at the meeting.
 
  NUMBER AND ELECTION OF DIRECTORS
 
  DGCL. Under the DGCL, the minimum number of directors is one. The DGCL
provides that the number of directors shall be fixed by, or in the manner
provided in, the by-laws, unless the certificate of incorporation fixes the
number of directors, in which case a change in the number of directors may be
made only upon amendment of the certificate of incorporation. In addition, the
DGCL permits, but does not require, a classified board of directors, with
staggered terms under which one-half or one-third of the directors are elected
for terms of two or three years, respectively. The DGCL further provides that
the vote of the majority of the directors present at a meeting at which a
quorum is present shall be the act of the board of directors unless the
certificate of incorporation or the by-laws shall require a vote of greater
number.
 
  Host. The Host Certificate provides that the number of directors shall be
fixed from time to time by or pursuant to the Host Bylaws. The Host Bylaws
provide that the Host Board shall be fixed from time to time by the Board of
Directors but shall not be less than three. The Host Certificate and Host
Bylaws provide that the Board of Directors is divided into three classes, each
consisting of approximately one-third of the total number of directors. The
term of office for each director is three years and such terms expire in
successive years at the time of the annual meeting of stockholders. The
current number of directors is eight. There are no cumulative voting rights in
the election of directors under the Host Certificate.
 
  MGCL. Under the MGCL, the minimum number of directors is three. The MGCL
provides that the number of directors shall be provided by the charter until
changed by the by-laws. The by-laws may both (i) alter the number of directors
set by the charter, and (ii) authorize a majority of the entire board of
directors to alter within specified limits the number of directors set by the
charter or the by-laws, but the action may not
 
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<PAGE>
 
affect the tenure of office of any director. In addition, the MGCL permits,
but does not require, a classified board of directors. If the directors are
divided into classes, the term of office may be provided in the by-laws,
except that (i) the term of office of a director may not be longer than five
years or, except in the case of an initial or substitute director, shorter
than the period between annual meetings, and (ii) the term of office of at
least one class must expire each year. Each share of stock may be voted for as
many individuals as there are directors to be elected and for whose election
the share is entitled to be voted. Unless the charter or by-laws provide
otherwise, a plurality of all the votes cast at a meeting at which a quorum is
present is sufficient to elect a director.
 
  Host REIT. The Host REIT Charter will provide that, effective upon
completion of the Merger, the Board of Directors will consist of eight members
and may thereafter be increased or decreased in accordance with the Host REIT
Bylaws, provided that the total number of directors may not be fewer than
three nor more than thirteen. Pursuant to the Host REIT Bylaws, the number of
directors shall be fixed by the Board of Directors within the limits set forth
in the Host REIT Charter. Further, the Host REIT Charter will provide that the
Board of Directors will be divided into three classes of directors, with each
class to consist as nearly as possible of an equal number of directors. The
term of office of the first class of directors will expire at the 1999 annual
meeting of stockholders; the term of the second class of directors will expire
at the 2000 annual meeting of stockholders; and the term of the third class of
directors will expire at the 2001 annual meeting of stockholders. At each
annual meeting of stockholders, the class of directors to be elected at such
meeting will be elected for a three-year term, and the directors in the other
two classes will continue in office. Because stockholders of Host REIT will
have no right to cumulative voting for the election of directors, at each
annual meeting of stockholders the holders of a majority of the outstanding
shares of Host REIT Common Stock will be able to elect all of the successors
to the class of directors whose term expires at that meeting.
 
  REMOVAL OF DIRECTORS
 
  DGCL. The DGCL provides that a director of a corporation may be removed with
or without cause by the holders of a majority of shares then entitled to vote
at an election of directors, provided, that, when a corporation has a
classified board of directors, a director may be removed only for cause,
unless the certificate of incorporation otherwise provides.
 
  Host. The Host Certificate and Host Bylaws provide that any director may be
removed from office, with or without cause, only by the affirmative vote of
the holders of at least 66 2/3% of the Voting Stock.
 
  MGCL. Under the MGCL, unless the charter provides otherwise, the
stockholders of a Maryland corporation may remove any director, with or
without cause, by the affirmative vote of a majority of all the votes entitled
to be cast for the election of directors, except that, unless the charter
provides otherwise, (i) if the stockholders of any class or series are
entitled separately to elect one or more directors, a director elected by a
class or series may not be removed without cause except by the affirmative
vote of a majority of all the votes of that class or series, (ii) if a
corporation has cumulative voting for the election of directors and less than
the entire board is to be removed, a director may not be removed without cause
if the votes cast against his removal would be sufficient to elect him if then
cumulatively voted at an election of the entire board of directors, or, if
there is more than one class of directors, at an election of the class of
directors of which he is a member, and (iii) if the directors have been
divided into classes, a director may not be removed without cause.
 
  Host REIT. The Host REIT Charter will provide that, except for any directors
who may be elected by holders of a class or series of shares other than Host
REIT Common Stock, directors may be removed only for cause and only by the
affirmative vote of stockholders holding at least two-thirds of all the votes
entitled to be cast for the election of directors.
 
  VACANCIES ON THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS
 
  DGCL. Under the DGCL, vacancies and newly created directorships may be
filled by a majority of the directors then in office, although less than a
quorum, unless otherwise provided in the certificate of incorporation
 
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<PAGE>
 
or the by-laws. However, if the certificate of incorporation directs that a
particular class is to elect such director, such vacancy may be filled only by
the other directors elected by such class. If, at the time of filing any
vacancy or newly created directorship, the directors then in office constitute
less than a majority of the whole board as constituted immediately prior to
such increase, the Delaware Court of Chancery may, upon application of
stockholders holding at least ten percent of the total number of shares
outstanding having the right to vote for such directors, order an election to
be held to fill any such vacancies or newly created directorships or to
replace the directors chosen by the directors then in office.
 
  Host. The Host Certificate and Host Bylaws provide that newly created
directorships resulting from any increase in the number of directors and any
vacancies on the board of directors resulting from death, resignation,
disqualification, removal or other cause shall be filled by the affirmative
vote of a majority of the remaining directors then in office, even though less
than a quorum of the board of directors. Any director elected in this manner
shall hold office for the remainder of the full term of the class of directors
in which the new directorship was created or the vacancy occurred and until
such director's successor shall have been elected and qualified. No decrease
in the number of directors may shorten the term of any incumbent director.
 
  MGCL. Under the MGCL, the stockholders may fill vacancies on the board of
directors caused by the removal of a director, except that if the stockholders
of any class or series are entitled separately to elect one or more directors,
the stockholders of that class or series may elect a successor to fill a
vacancy which results from the removal of a director elected by that class or
series. The MGCL further provides that unless the charter or by-laws provide
otherwise, a majority of the remaining directors, whether or not sufficient to
constitute a quorum, may fill a vacancy on the board of directors which
results from any cause except that (i) a vacancy caused by an increase in the
number of directors may be filled by a majority of the entire board, and (ii)
if the stockholders of any class or series are entitled separately to elect
one or more directors, a majority of the remaining directors elected by that
class or series or the sole remaining director elected by that class or series
may fill any vacancy among the number of directors elected by that class or
series.
 
  Under the MGCL, a director elected by the board of directors to fill a
vacancy serves until the next annual meeting of stockholders and until his
successor is elected and qualifies. A director elected by the stockholders to
fill a vacancy which results from the removal of a director serves for the
balance of the term of the removed director.
 
  Host REIT. The Host REIT Charter and Bylaws provide that vacancies on the
Board of Directors may be filled by the concurring vote of a majority of the
remaining directors and, in the case of a vacancy resulting from the removal
of a director by the stockholders, by the stockholders by at least two-thirds
of all the votes entitled to be cast in the election of directors.
 
  ADVANCE NOTICE OF DIRECTOR NOMINATIONS AND OF NEW BUSINESS PROPOSALS
 
  Host. The Host Bylaws provide that (i) nominations for persons for election
to the Board of Directors may be made (A) with respect to an annual meeting of
the stockholders, by the Board of Directors or a proxy committee appointed by
the Board of Directors, or by any stockholder entitled to vote in the election
of directors if written notice of such stockholder's intent to make such
nomination or nominations is given to the Secretary of Host not later than
ninety days in advance of the date established by the Host Bylaws for the
holding of such meeting, or (B) with respect to special meetings of the
stockholders, by the Board of Directors or a proxy committee appointed by the
Board of Directors, or by any stockholder entitled to vote in the election of
directors if written notice of such stockholder's intent to make such
nomination or nominations is given to the Secretary of Host not later than the
close of business on the seventh day following the date on which notice of
such meeting is first given to stockholders, and (ii) stockholder proposals
may be made by any stockholder entitled to vote in the election of directors
and who satisfies the requirements of the proxy rules under the Exchange Act
by notice in writing, such notice to be received by the Secretary of Host not
less than (X) with respect to an annual meeting of the stockholders, one
hundred and twenty days in advance of the date established for the holding of
such
 
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meeting, or (Y) with respect to special meeting of the stockholders, the close
of business on the seventh day following the date on which notice of such
meeting is first given to stockholders.
 
  Host REIT. The Host REIT Bylaws provide that (i) with respect to an annual
meeting of stockholders, nominations of persons for election to the Board of
Directors and the proposal of business to be considered by stockholders may be
made only (A) pursuant to Host REIT's notice of meeting, (B) by the Board of
Directors or (C) by a stockholder who is entitled to vote at the meeting and
has complied with the advance notice procedures set forth in the Host REIT
Bylaws and (ii) with respect to special meetings of the stockholders, only the
business specified in Host REIT's notice of meeting may be brought before the
meeting of stockholders and nominations of persons for election to the Board
of Directors may be made only (X) pursuant to Host REIT's notice of the
meeting, (Y) by the Board of Directors or (Z) provided that the Board of
Directors has determined that directors shall be elected at such meeting, by a
stockholder who is entitled to vote at the meeting and has complied with the
advance notice provisions set forth in the Host REIT Bylaws. The advance
notice provisions contained in the Host REIT Bylaws generally require
nominations and new business proposals by stockholders to be delivered to the
Secretary of Host REIT not later than the close of business on the 60th day
nor earlier than the close of business on the 90th day prior to the first
anniversary of the preceding year's annual meeting of stockholders.
 
  TRANSACTIONS INVOLVING DIRECTORS OR OFFICERS
 
  DGCL. Under the DGCL, no contract or transaction between a corporation and
one or more of its directors or officers, or between a corporation and any
other corporation, partnership, association, or other organization in which
one or more of its directors or officers, are directors or officers, or have a
financial interest, shall be void or voidable solely for this reason, or
solely because the director or officer is present at or participates in the
meeting of the board or committee which authorizes the contract or
transaction, or solely because such director's votes are counted for such
purpose, if (i) the material facts as to such director's relationship or
interest and as to the contract or transaction are disclosed or are known to
the board of directors or the committee, and the board or committee in good
faith authorizes the contract or transaction by the affirmative votes of a
majority of the disinterested directors, even though the disinterested
directors be less than a quorum; (ii) the material facts as to such director's
relationship or interest and as to the contract or transaction are disclosed
or are known to the stockholders entitled to vote thereon, and the contract or
transaction is specifically approved in good faith by vote of the
stockholders; or (iii) the contract or transaction is fair to the corporation
as of the time it is authorized, approved or ratified by the board of
directors, a committee or the stockholders.
 
  A corporation may lend money to, or guarantee any obligation of, or
otherwise assist any officer or other employee of the corporation or of its
subsidiary, including any officer who is a director of the corporation or its
subsidiary, whenever, in the judgment of the directors, such loan, guaranty or
assistance may reasonably be expected to benefit the corporation.
 
  Host. The Host Certificate provides that the corporation may enter into
contracts or transact business with one or more of its officers or directors,
or with any firms of which one or more of its officers or directors is a
member, or may invest its funds in the securities of and may enter into
contracts, or transact business with any corporation or association in which
any one or more of its officers or directors is a stockholder, officer or
director, and in the absence of bad faith, or unfair dealing, such contract or
transaction or investment shall not be invalidated or to any extent affected
by the fact that any such officer or officers or any such director or
directors has or may have interests therein which are or might be adverse to
the interests of the corporation, provided that the remaining directors are
sufficient in number to ratify and approve the transaction.
 
  MGCL. Under the MGCL, a contract or transaction between a Maryland
corporation and any of its directors or between a Maryland corporation and any
other corporation, firm, or other entity in which any of its directors is a
director, or has a material financial interest, is not void or voidable solely
for this reason, or solely because the director is present at the meeting of
the board or committee of the board which authorizes, approves, or ratifies
the contract or transaction, or solely because such director's or directors'
votes are counted for such purpose, if (i) the fact of common directorship or
interest is disclosed or known to the board of directors or the
 
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committee, and the board or committee authorizes, approves, or ratifies the
contract or transaction by the affirmative vote of a majority of disinterested
directors, even if the disinterested directors constitute less than a quorum,
(ii) the fact of common directorship or interest is disclosed or known to the
stockholders entitled to vote, and the contract or transaction is authorized,
approved, or ratified by a majority of the votes cast by the stockholders
entitled to vote other than the votes of shares owned of record or
beneficially by the interested corporation, firm or other entity, or (iii) the
contract or transaction is fair and reasonable to the corporation. Common or
interested directors or the stock owned by them or by an interested
corporation, firm, or other entity may be counted in determining the presence
of a quorum at a meeting of the board of directors or a committee of the board
or at a meeting of the stockholders, as the case may be, at which the contract
or transaction is authorized, approved or ratified.
 
  Host REIT. As a Maryland corporation, Host REIT will be subject to the
foregoing provisions with respect to transactions between Host REIT and its
directors. Host REIT's Board of Directors also intends to adopt a policy which
would require that all material contracts and transactions between Host REIT,
the Operating Partnership or any of its subsidiaries, on the one hand, and a
director or executive officer of Host REIT or any entity in which such
director or executive officer is a director or has a material financial
interest, on the other hand, must be approved by the affirmative vote of a
majority of the disinterested directors. Where appropriate in the judgment of
the disinterested directors, the Board of Directors may obtain a fairness
opinion or engage independent counsel to represent the interests of
nonaffiliated security holders, although the Board of Directors will have no
obligation to do so. See "Distribution and Other Policies--Conflicts of
Interest Policies."
 
  LIMITATION OF LIABILITY AND INDEMNIFICATION OF DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS
 
  DGCL. Under the DGCL, directors may be indemnified for liabilities incurred
in connection with specified actions (other than any action brought by or in
the right of the corporation), if they acted in good faith and in a manner
they reasonably believed to be in and not opposed to the best interests of the
corporation and, with respect to any criminal action or proceeding, had no
reasonable cause to believe their conduct was unlawful. The same standard of
conduct is applicable for indemnification in the case of derivative actions
brought by or in the right of the corporation, except that in such cases the
DGCL authorizes indemnification only for expenses (including attorneys' fees)
incurred in connection with the defense or settlement of such cases. Moreover,
the DGCL requires court approval before there can be any such indemnification
where the person seeking indemnification has been found liable to the
corporation in a derivative action. The DGCL states expressly that the
indemnification provided by or granted pursuant to the DGCL is not deemed
exclusive of any non-statutory indemnification rights existing under any by-
laws, agreement, vote of stockholders or disinterested directors or otherwise.
 
  Host. Host's Certificate of Incorporation and Bylaws provide that every
director, officer and employee of Host shall be indemnified against all
expenses and liabilities, including counsel fees, reasonably incurred by or
imposed upon him by reason of his being or having been a director, officer or
employee of Host. Under Host's Certificate, no director shall be liable to
Host or its shareholders for monetary damages, for breach of fiduciary duty as
a director, except for liability (a) for any breach of the director's duty of
loyalty to the corporation or its shareholders, (b) for acts or omissions not
in good faith or which involve intentional misconduct or knowing violation of
law, (c) under section 174 of the DGCL (concerning unlawful payment of
dividend or unlawful stock purchase or redemption), or (d) for any transaction
from which the directors derived an improper personal benefit.
 
  MGCL. The MGCL permits a Maryland corporation to include in its charter a
provision limiting the liability of its directors and officers to the
corporation and its shareholders for money damages except for liability
resulting from (i) actual receipt of an improper benefit or profit in money,
property or services or (ii) acts committed in bad faith or active and
deliberate dishonesty established by a final judgment as being material to the
cause of action. The MGCL further provides that Host REIT may not indemnify
for an adverse judgment in a suit by or in the right of Host REIT. The MGCL
expressly states that the indemnification or advancement of expenses
authorized by the MGCL shall not be deemed exclusive of any other rights, by
indemnification or
 
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otherwise, to which a director or officer may be entitled under the charter,
the bylaws, a resolution of the stockholders or directors, an agreement or
otherwise.
 
  Host REIT. The Host REIT Charter provides broad indemnification to directors
and officers, whether serving Host REIT, or at its request, any other entity,
to the fullest extent permitted under Maryland law. Host REIT will indemnify
its present and former directors and officers, among others, against
judgments, penalties, fines, settlements and reasonable expenses actually
incurred by them in connection with any proceeding to which they may be made a
party by reason of their service in those or other capacities unless it is
established that (i) the act or omission of the director or officer was
material to the matter giving rise to the proceeding and (a) was committed in
bad faith or (b) was the result of active and deliberate dishonesty, (ii) the
director or officer actually received an improper personal benefit in money,
property or services or (iii) in the case of any criminal proceeding, the
director or officer had reasonable cause to believe that the act or omission
was unlawful.
 
  The Bylaws of Host REIT require Host REIT, as a condition to advancing
expenses, to obtain (i) a written affirmation by the director or officer of
his good faith belief that he has met the standard of conduct necessary for
indemnification by Host REIT as authorized by the Bylaws and (ii) a written
statement by or on his behalf to repay the amount paid or reimbursed by Host
REIT if it shall ultimately be determined that the standard of conduct was not
met.
 
  Host REIT also intends to enter into indemnification agreements indemnifying
each of its directors and officers to the fullest extent permitted by Maryland
law and to advance to its directors and officers all related expenses subject
to reimbursement if it is subsequently determined that indemnification is not
permitted. See "--Limitation of Liability and Indemnification of Directors and
Officers" for a description of the limitations on liability of directors and
officers of Host REIT and the provisions for indemnification of directors and
officers provided for under applicable Maryland law and the Host REIT Charter.
 
  DECLARATION OF DIVIDENDS
 
  DGCL. Under the DGCL, a corporation is permitted to declare and pay
dividends out of surplus (as defined in the DGCL) or, if there is no surplus,
out of net profits for the fiscal year in which the dividend is declared
and/or for the preceding fiscal year as long as the amount of capital of the
corporation following the declaration and payment of the dividend is not less
than the aggregate amount of the capital represented by the issued and
outstanding stock of all classes having a preference upon the distribution of
assets. In addition, the DGCL generally provides that a corporation may redeem
or repurchase its shares only if such redemption or repurchase would not
impair the capital of the corporation.
 
  Host. The Host Bylaws provide that dividends upon the capital stock of Host,
subject to the provisions of the Host Certificate, if any, may be declared by
the Host Board at any regular or special meeting, pursuant to law. Dividends
may be paid in cash, in property, or in shares of the capital stock, subject
to the provisions of the Host Certificate.
 
  MGCL. Under the MGCL, if authorized by its board of directors, a Maryland
corporation may declare and pay dividends unless, after giving effect to the
dividend, (i) the corporation would not be able to pay indebtedness of the
corporation as the indebtedness becomes due in the usual course of business,
or (ii) the corporation's total assets would be less than the sum of the
corporation's total liabilities plus, unless the charter permits otherwise,
the amount that would be needed, if the corporation were to be dissolved at
the time of the distribution, to satisfy the preferential rights upon
dissolution of the stockholders whose preferential rights on dissolution are
superior to those receiving the dividend.
 
  Host REIT. The Host REIT Charter and Host REIT Bylaws do not prescribe any
standards for the making of distributions. Host REIT and the Operating
Partnership intend to pay regular quarterly distributions to holders of shares
of Host REIT Common Stock and OP Units. For a discussion of Host REIT's
distribution policy, see "Distribution and Other Policies--Distribution
Policy."
 
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<PAGE>
 
 
  APPRAISAL RIGHTS
 
  DGCL. Under the DGCL, the right to receive the fair value of dissenting
shares is made available to stockholders of a constituent corporation in a
merger or consolidation effected under the DGCL. Dissenters' rights of
appraisal are not available for the shares of any class or series of stock,
which stock, or depository receipts in respect thereof, at the record date
fixed to determine stockholders entitled to receive notice and vote on such
transaction, were either (i) listed on a national securities exchange or
designated as a national market system security on an interdealer quotation
system by the National Association of Security Dealers, Inc. or (ii) held of
record by more than 2,000 holders. Further, no appraisal rights are available
for any shares of stock of the constituent corporation surviving a merger if
the merger did not require for its approval the vote of the stockholders of
the surviving corporation as provided by the DGCL.
 
  Notwithstanding the foregoing, appraisal rights under the DGCL are available
for the shares of any class or series of stock of a constituent corporation if
the holders thereof are required by the terms of an agreement of merger or
consolidation pursuant to the DGCL to accept for such stock anything except
(i) shares of stock of the corporation surviving or resulting from such merger
or consolidation, or depository receipts in respect thereof, (ii) shares of
stock of any other corporation, or depository receipts in respect thereof,
which shares of stock (or depository receipts in respect thereof) will be
either listed on a national securities exchange or designated as a national
market system security on an interdealer quotation system by the National
Association of Securities Dealers, Inc., or held of record by more than 2,000
holders, (iii) cash in lieu of fractional shares, or (iv) any combination of
the shares of stock, depository receipts and cash in lieu of such fractional
shares.
 
  MGCL. Under the MGCL, a stockholder of a Maryland corporation has the right
to demand and receive payment of the fair value of the stockholder's stock
from the corporation if, among other things, the corporation consolidates or
merges with another corporation. However, unless the transaction is governed
by certain provisions specified by the MGCL, a stockholder may not demand the
fair value of his stock and is bound by the terms of the transaction if (i)
the stock is listed on a national securities exchange or is designated as a
national market system security on an interdealer quotation system by the
National Association of Securities Dealers, Inc.; (ii) the stock is that of
the successor in a merger, unless (a) the merger alters the contract rights of
the stock as expressly set forth in the charter, and the charter does not
reserve the right to do so, or (b) the stock is to be changed or converted in
whole or in part in the merger into something other than either stock in the
successor or cash, scrip, or other rights or interests arising out of the
provisions for the treatment of fractional shares of stock in the successor;
or (iii) the stock is that of an open-end investment company registered with
the SEC under the Investment Company Act of 1940 and the value placed on the
stock in the transaction is its net asset value.
 
  LIQUIDATION RIGHTS UPON DISSOLUTION
 
  DGCL. Under the DGCL, unless the board of directors approves a proposal to
dissolve a corporation, the dissolution must be approved by stockholders
holding 100% of the total voting power of the corporation. If the dissolution
is initiated by the board of directors, it need only be approved by a majority
of the corporation's stockholders.
 
  Host. Neither the Host Certificate nor the Host Bylaws contain any
additional provisions relating to liquidation rights upon dissolution.
 
  MGCL. Under the MGCL, a Maryland corporation may terminate its existence by
voluntary dissolution if (i) a majority of the entire board of directors
adopts a resolution which declares that such dissolution is advisable, and
(ii) the proposed dissolution is approved by the stockholders of the
corporation by the affirmative vote of two-thirds of all the votes entitled to
be cast on the matter.
 
  Host REIT. Under the Host REIT Charter, subject to the provisions of any
class or series of shares at the time outstanding, the Board of Directors must
obtain approval of holders of at least two-thirds of all of the votes entitled
to be cast on the matter in order to dissolve Host REIT.
 
                                      64

<PAGE>
 
  MERGER, CONSOLIDATION, SHARE EXCHANGE AND TRANSFER OF ALL OR SUBSTANTIALLY
ALL ASSETS
 
  DGCL. Under the DGCL, the principal terms of a merger or consolidation
generally require the approval of the stockholders of each of the constituent
corporations. Unless otherwise required in a corporation's certificate of
incorporation, the DGCL does not require a stockholder vote of the surviving
corporation in a merger if (i) the agreement of merger does not amend in any
respect the certificate of incorporation of such constituent corporation, (ii)
each share of stock of such constituent corporation outstanding immediately
prior to the effective date of the merger is to be an identical outstanding or
treasury share of the surviving corporation after the effective date of the
merger, and (iii) either no shares of common stock of the surviving
corporation and no shares, securities or obligations convertible into such
stock are to be issued or delivered under the plan of merger, or the
authorized unissued shares or the treasury shares of common stock of the
surviving corporation to be issued or delivered under the plan of merger plus
those initially issuable upon conversion of any other shares, securities or
obligations to be issued or delivered under such plan do not exceed 20% of the
shares of common stock of such constituent corporation outstanding immediately
prior to the effective date of the merger.
 
  When a stockholder vote is required under the DGCL to approve a merger or
consolidation, unless the certificate of incorporation provides otherwise, the
affirmative vote of a majority of shares present in person or represented by
proxy for each class of shares entitled to vote on the merger or consolidation
shall be required to approve the merger or consolidation. If multiple classes
of stock are entitled to vote on the merger or consolidation as separate
classes, then a majority of each class entitled to vote to approve the merger
or consolidation, voting separately as a class, shall be required to approve
the merger or consolidation.
 
  Under the DGCL, a corporation may at any meeting of its board of directors
or governing body, sell, lease or exchange all or substantially all of its
property and assets, including its goodwill and its corporate franchises, upon
such terms and conditions and for such consideration, which may consist in
whole or in part of money or other property, including shares of stock in,
and/or other securities of, and other corporation or corporations, as its
board of directors or governing body deems expedient and for the best
interests of the corporation, when and as authorized by a resolution adopted
by the holders of a majority of the outstanding stock of the corporation
entitled to vote thereon.
 
  Host. The Host Certificate provides that the affirmative vote of the holders
of shares representing not less than 66 2/3% of the voting power of the
corporation shall be required for the approval of any proposal for the
corporation to reorganize, merge, or consolidate with any other corporation,
or to sell, lease, or exchange substantially all of its assets or business.
 
  MGCL. The MGCL generally provides that mergers, consolidations, share
exchanges or transfers of assets must first be approved by a majority of the
Board of Directors and thereafter approved by stockholders by the affirmative
vote of two-thirds of all the votes entitled to be cast on the matter (unless
the charter provides for a lesser stockholder vote but not less than a
majority of the number of votes entitled to be cast on the matter). However,
under the MGCL, certain mergers may be accomplished without a vote of
stockholders. For example, no stockholder vote is required for a merger of a
subsidiary of a Maryland corporation into its parent, provided the parent owns
at least 90 percent of the subsidiary. In addition, a merger need not be
approved by stockholders of a Maryland successor corporation if the merger
does not reclassify or change the outstanding shares or otherwise amend the
charter, and the number of shares to be issued or delivered in the merger is
not more than 20 percent of the number of its shares of the same class or
series outstanding immediately before the merger becomes effective. A share
exchange need be approved by a Maryland successor only by its Board of
Directors. Under the MGCL, a "transfer of assets" is defined to mean any sale,
lease, exchange or other transfer of all or substantially all of the assets of
the corporation but does not include (i) a transfer of assets by a corporation
in the ordinary course of business actually conducted by it, (ii) a mortgage,
pledge or creation of any other security interest in any or all of the assets
of the corporation, whether or not in the ordinary course of its business,
(iii) an exchange of shares of stock through voluntary action under any
agreement with the stockholders, or (iv) a transfer of assets to one or more
persons if all the equity interests of the person or persons are owned,
directly or indirectly, by the corporation.
 
                                      65

<PAGE>
 
  Host REIT. Pursuant to the Host REIT Charter, subject to the terms of any
class or series of stock at the time outstanding, Host REIT may merge with or
into another entity, but any such merger must be approved (i) by the Board of
Directors in the manner provided in the MGCL and (ii) by the stockholders to
the extent required under the MGCL. The Host REIT Charter generally provides
for stockholder approval of such transactions by a two-thirds vote of all
votes entitled to be cast (subject to the above enumerated statutory
exceptions to a stockholder vote), except that any merger of Host REIT with or
into a trust organized for the purpose of changing Host REIT's form of
organization from a corporation to a trust will require the approval of
stockholders of Host REIT by the affirmative vote only of a majority of all
the votes entitled to be cast on the matter.
 
  Subject to the terms of any class or series of stock at the time
outstanding, under the Host REIT Charter, Host REIT also may, to the extent
permitted by law, consolidate Host REIT with one or more other entities into a
new entity or affect a share exchange, but any such action must be approved by
the Board of Directors and, after notice to all stockholders entitled to vote
on the matter, by the affirmative vote of two-thirds of all the votes entitled
to be cast on the matter (subject to any enumerated exceptions to a
stockholder vote set forth in the MGCL for such transactions).
 
  CHANGES IN CONTROL PURSUANT TO DELAWARE/MARYLAND LAW
 
  DGCL. Section 203 of the DGCL provides that, subject to certain exceptions
specified therein, a corporation will not engage in any business combination
with any "interested stockholder" for a three-year period following the time
that such stockholder becomes an interested stockholder unless (i) prior to
such time the board of directors of the corporation approved either the
business combination or the transaction which resulted in the stockholder
becoming an interested stockholder, (ii) upon consummation of the transaction
which resulted in the stockholder becoming an interested stockholder, the
interested stockholder owned at least 85% of the voting stock of the
corporation outstanding at the time the transaction commenced (excluding for
purposes of determining the number of shares outstanding those shares owned by
persons who are directors and also officers, and employee stock plans in which
employee participants do not have the right to determine confidentially
whether shares held subject to the plan will be tendered in a tender or
exchange offer), or (iii) at or subsequent to such time the business
combination is approved by the board of directors and authorized at an annual
or special meeting of stockholders, and not by written consent, by the
affirmative vote of at least 66 2/3% of the outstanding voting stock which is
not owned by the interested stockholder. Except as specified in Section 203 of
the DGCL, an interested stockholder is defined to include any person that (a)
is the owner of 15% or more of the outstanding voting stock of the
corporation, or (b) is an affiliate or associate of the corporation and was
the owner of 15% or more of the outstanding voting stock of the corporation at
any time within the 3-year period immediately prior to the date on which it is
sought to be determined whether such person is an interested stockholder; and
the affiliates and associates of such person. Section 203(b)(4) exempts from
the restrictions in Section 203 a corporation that does not have a class of
voting stock that is (i) listed on a national securities exchange, (ii)
authorized for quotation on The NASDAQ Stock Market, or (iii) held of record
by more than 2,000 stockholders, unless any of the foregoing results from
action taken, directly or indirectly, by an interested stockholder or from a
transaction in which a person becomes an interested stockholder.
 
  Host. The Host Certificate provides that in addition to any affirmative vote
required by law or by the Host Certificate, certain Business Combinations (as
defined in the Host Certificate) involving "interested shareholders" (as
defined below) require the affirmative vote of the holders of at least 66 2/3%
of the voting power of all the shares of the corporation entitled to vote
generally in the election of directors ("Voting Stock"), voting together as a
single class unless the Business Combination is approved by a majority of the
Disinterested Directors (as defined in the Host Certificate) or certain other
conditions are satisfied. An "interested shareholder" is defined by the Host
Certificate as any person (other than Host or any subsidiary of Host) who or
which (i) is the beneficial owner, directly or indirectly, of more than 25% of
the voting power of the outstanding Voting Stock, (ii) is an affiliate of Host
(as defined in the Host Certificate) and at any time within the two-year
period immediately prior to the date in question was the beneficial owner,
directly or indirectly, of 25% or more of the voting power of the then
outstanding Voting Stock, or (iii) is an assignee of or has otherwise
succeeded to any shares of Voting Stock which were at any time within the two-
year period immediately prior to the date in question beneficially owned by
any "interested shareholder," if such assignment or succession shall have
 
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<PAGE>
 
occurred in the course of a transaction or series of transactions not
involving a public offering within the meaning of the Securities Act.
 
  MGCL. Under the MGCL, certain "business combinations" (including certain
issuances of equity securities) between a Maryland corporation and any person
who owns 10% or more of the voting power of the then outstanding shares of
stock (an "Interested Stockholder") or an affiliate of the Interested
Stockholder are prohibited for five years after the most recent date on which
the Interested Stockholder becomes an Interested Stockholder. Thereafter, any
such business combination must be approved by a supermajority (80%) of
outstanding voting shares, and by two-thirds of voting shares held by an
Interested Stockholder unless, among other conditions, the corporation's
common stockholders receive a minimum price (as defined in the MGCL) for their
shares and the consideration is received in cash or in the same form as
previously paid by the Interested Stockholder.
 
  The MGCL further provides that "control shares" acquired in a "control share
acquisition" have no voting rights except to the extent approved by a vote of
two-thirds of the votes entitled to be cast on the matter, excluding shares
owned by the acquiror and by officers or directors who are employees of the
corporation. "Control shares" are voting shares which, if aggregated with all
other such shares previously acquired by the acquiror or in respect of which
the acquiror is able to exercise or direct the exercise of voting power
(except solely by virtue of a revocable proxy), would entitle the acquiror to
exercise voting power in electing directors within one of the following ranges
of voting power: (i) one-fifth or more but less than one-third, (ii) one-third
or more but less than a majority, (iii) a majority or more of the voting
power. Control shares do not include shares the acquiring person is then
entitled to vote as a result of having previously obtained stockholder
approval. A "control share acquisition" means the acquisition of control
shares, subject to certain exceptions.
 
  Host REIT. Host REIT has not "opted-out" of the business combination or
"control share" acquisition provisions of the MGCL, and, accordingly will be
subject to such provisions.
 
  STOCKHOLDER RIGHTS PLAN
 
  Host. Host currently has in effect a stockholder rights plan pursuant to the
Host Rights Agreement and it has preferred stock purchase rights attached to
the Host Common Stock pursuant to such rights plan.
 
  Host REIT. Host REIT intends to adopt a Stockholder Rights Plan to replace
the existing stockholder rights plan. All shares of Host REIT Common Stock
issued by Host REIT between the date of adoption of the Stockholder Rights
Plan and the rights distribution date, or the date, if any, on which the Host
REIT Rights are redeemed would have Host REIT Rights attached to them. See
"Description of Host REIT Capital Stock--Certain Provisions of Maryland Law
and the Host REIT Charter and Host REIT Bylaws--Stockholder Rights Plan." The
Stockholder Rights Plan is expected to provide, among other things, that upon
the occurrence of certain events, stockholders will be entitled to purchase
from Host REIT a newly created series of junior preferred stock, subject to
Host REIT's Ownership Limit. See "Description of Host REIT Capital Stock--
Certain Provisions of Maryland Law and the Host REIT Charter and Bylaws."
 
  The discussion of the comparative rights of stockholders of Host and
shareholders of Host REIT set forth above is not complete and is subject to
and qualified in its entirety by reference to the DGCL and the MGCL and to the
Host Certificate, Host Bylaws and the Host Rights Agreement and the Host REIT
Charter, Host REIT Bylaws and the Shareholder Rights Plan. Copies of the Host
REIT Charter and Host REIT Bylaws are attached as Exhibits A and B,
respectively, to the Agreement, which is attached to this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus as Appendix A.
 
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY AND INDEMNIFICATION OF DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS
 
  The MGCL permits a Maryland corporation to include in its charter a
provision limiting the liability of its directors and officers to the
corporation and its stockholders for money damages except for liability
resulting
 
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<PAGE>
 
from (a) actual receipt of an improper benefit or profit in money, property or
services or (b) acts committed in bad faith or active and deliberate
dishonesty established by a final judgment as being material to the cause of
action. The Host REIT Charter contains such a provision which limits such
liability to the maximum extent permitted by Maryland law.
 
  The Host REIT Charter authorizes it, to the maximum extent permitted by
Maryland law, to obligate itself to indemnify and to pay or reimburse
reasonable expenses in advance of final disposition of a proceeding to (i) any
present or former director or officer or (ii) any individual who, while a
director of Host REIT and at the request of Host REIT, serves or has served
another corporation, real estate investment trust, partnership, joint venture,
trust, employee benefit plan or any other enterprise from and against any
claim or liability to which such person may become subject or which such
person may incur by reason of his or her status as a present or former
Director or officer of Host REIT. The Host REIT Bylaws obligate it, to the
maximum extent permitted by Maryland law, to indemnify and to pay or reimburse
reasonable expenses in advance of final disposition of a proceeding to (a) any
present or former director or officer who is made party to the proceeding by
reason of his service in that capacity or (b) any individual who, while a
director or officer of Host REIT and at the request of Host REIT, serves or
has served another corporation, real estate investment trust, partnership,
joint venture, trust, employee benefit plan or any other enterprise as a
director, trustee, officer or partner of such corporation, real estate
investment trust, partnership, joint venture, trust, employee benefit plan or
other enterprise and who is made a party to the proceeding by reason of his
service in that capacity, against any claim or liability to which he may
become subject by reason of such status. The Host REIT Charter and Host REIT
Bylaws also permit Host REIT to indemnify and advance expenses to any person
who served as a predecessor of Host REIT in any of the capacities described
above and to any employee or agent of Host REIT or a predecessor of Host REIT.
The Host REIT Bylaws require Host REIT to indemnify a director or officer who
has been successful on the merits or otherwise in the defense of any
proceeding to which he is made a party by reason of his service in that
capacity.
 
  The MGCL permits a Maryland corporation to indemnify and advance expenses to
its directors, officers, employees and agents, and permits a corporation to
indemnify its present and former directors and officers, among others, against
judgments, penalties, fines, settlements and reasonable expenses actually
incurred by them in connection with any proceeding to which they may be made a
party by reason of their service in those or other capacities unless it is
established that (a) the act or omission of the director or officer was
material to the matter giving rise to the proceeding and (i) was committed in
bad faith or (ii) was the result of active and deliberate dishonesty, (b) the
director or officer actually received an improper personal benefit in money,
property or services or (c) in the case of any criminal proceeding, the
director or officer had reasonable cause to believe that the act or omission
was unlawful. However, under the MGCL, a Maryland corporation may not
indemnify for an adverse judgment in a suit by or in the right of the
corporation. In accordance with the MGCL, the Host REIT Bylaws require it, as
a condition to advancing expenses, to obtain (1) a written affirmation by the
director or officer of his good faith belief that he has met the standard of
conduct necessary for indemnification by Host REIT as authorized by the Host
REIT Bylaws and (2) a written statement by or on his behalf to repay the
amount paid or reimbursed by Host REIT if it shall ultimately be determined
that the standard of conduct was not met.
 
  The Partnership Agreement also provides for indemnification of Host REIT and
its officers and directors to the same extent that indemnification is provided
to officers and directors of Host REIT in the Host REIT Charter, and limits
the liability of Host REIT and its officers and directors to the Operating
Partnership and its respective partners to the same extent that the liability
of the officers and directors of Host REIT to Host REIT and its stockholders
is limited under the Host REIT Charter. See "Description of the Partnership
Agreement and OP Units--Exculpation and Indemnification of Host REIT."
 
  Insofar as indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act
may be permitted to directors, officers or persons controlling the registrant
pursuant to the foregoing provisions, Host REIT has been informed that in the
opinion of the Commission such indemnification is against public policy as
expressed in the Securities Act and is therefore unenforceable.
 
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                              THE REIT CONVERSION
 
  The transactions summarized below, together with the Restructuring
Transactions, collectively constitute the transactions pursuant to which Host
will restructure its business so that it will qualify as a REIT. If the
required corporate (Board and stockholder) and partnership approvals for the
various transactions are obtained and other conditions to the different steps
in the REIT Conversion are satisfied or waived, these transactions are
expected to occur at various times prior to the end of 1998 (or as soon
thereafter as practicable). The Restructuring Transactions are expected to
occur at the final stage of the REIT Conversion, although certain of the
transactions comprising the REIT Conversion (such as the Partnership Mergers,
the Private Partnership Transactions and the Blackstone Acquisition) may occur
after the Restructuring Transactions to the extent they are consummated.
 
THE INITIAL E&P DISTRIBUTION
 
  In order to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, among other
things, Host REIT and/or Host, as its predecessor, must have distributed all
of the accumulated E&P of Host to their stockholders in one or more taxable
dividends prior to the end of the first full taxable year for which the REIT
election of Host is effective, which currently is expected to be the taxable
year commencing January 1, 1999.
 
  In an effort to help accomplish the requisite distributions of the
accumulated E&P of Host, Host or Host REIT will make the Initial E&P
Distribution, consisting of one or more taxable distributions to their
stockholders in connection with the REIT Conversion consisting of shares of
common stock of Crestline and cash or other consideration in an amount to be
determined. Although there is no assurance that such other consideration
comprising the Initial E&P Distribution will take this form, it is currently
contemplated that such other consideration will consist of either a specified
dollar amount of cash or a specified fraction of a share of Host Common Stock
(or a share of Host REIT Common Stock if the Merger has occurred), as elected
by the Host stockholders. Pursuant to the Election Rights, recipients of the
Election Rights would be entitled to elect between the cash and Host REIT
Common Stock alternative during the approximately 20 business day period after
the record date for the Election Rights distribution and such elections would
be irrevocable. In such event, the cash/stock election would be made by a
recipient on a per-share basis so that an Election Rights recipient could
elect to receive cash for a portion of such recipient's shares held on the
record date and Host Common Stock (or Host REIT Common Stock if the Merger has
occurred) for the remaining portion. To the extent that a Host stockholder
does not make a timely election, the Election Rights would provide that Host
stockholders would receive shares of Host Common Stock (or Host REIT Common
Stock if the Merger has occurred), subject to the Ownership Limit. The cash
would be paid or Host REIT shares would be issued promptly after the end of
the election period. In connection with such Election Rights, cash would be
paid in lieu of fractional shares.
 
  The aggregate value of the Crestline common stock and the cash or other
consideration to be distributed to Host stockholders (and the Blackstone
Entities) in connection with the Initial E&P Distribution is currently
estimated to be approximately $525 million to $625 million (approximately
$2.10 to $2.50 per share to the Host stockholders). The actual amount of the
Initial E&P Distribution will be based in part upon the estimated amount of
accumulated E&P of Host as of the last day of its taxable year ending on or
immediately following completion of the REIT Conversion. To the extent that
the Initial E&P Distribution is not sufficient to eliminate Host's accumulated
E&P, Host REIT will make one or more additional taxable distributions to its
stockholders (in the form of cash or securities) prior to the last day of Host
REIT's first full taxable year as a REIT (currently expected to be December
31, 1999) in an amount intended to be sufficient to eliminate such E&P, and
the Operating Partnership will make corresponding distributions to all holders
of OP Units (including Host REIT) in an amount sufficient to permit Host REIT
to make such additional distributions.
 
  Limited Partners who elect to receive Host REIT Common Stock in exchange for
OP Units in connection with the Partnership Mergers will not receive the
Crestline common stock or any other portion of the Initial E&P Distribution,
which will have been distributed before they become stockholders of Host REIT
(approximately 25 trading days after the effective date of the Partnership
Mergers). No holder of Host REIT Common Stock will be required to pay any cash
or other consideration to Host REIT for shares of Crestline common stock
received in the Initial E&P Distribution or to surrender or exchange their
Host REIT Common Stock in order to receive
 
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<PAGE>
 
shares of Crestline common stock or other cash or securities as part of the
Initial E&P Distribution. See "The REIT Conversion--The Initial E&P
Distribution."
 
  In addition, following the Restructuring Transactions, the Blackstone
Entities are entitled to receive a pro rata portion of the same consideration
received by Host REIT's stockholders in connection with the Initial E&P
Distribution, except to the extent the Blackstone Entities elected to receive
additional OP Units in lieu thereof pursuant to the terms of the Blackstone
Acquisition. The payment to the Blackstone Entities of Crestline shares and
other consideration is expected to be approximately $90 to $110 million of the
aggregate Initial E&P Distribution of approximately $525 to $625 million if
the REIT Conversion and the Blackstone Acquisition are consummated. See
"Business and Properties--Blackstone Acquisition." Following the Initial E&P
Distribution, Crestline's principal assets will include the senior living
assets of Host, which are expected to consist of 31 senior living communities,
a 25% interest in the Swissotel management company acquired from the
Blackstone Entities and the Lessees. Certain REITs have spun-off public
operating companies to conduct certain activities which REITs are prohibited
from conducting and have described such structure as a "paper-clip" structure.
There is no established definition of a "paper-clip" structure. While Host
REIT and Crestline clearly expect to have a mutually beneficial, long-term
relationship, they do not believe that their relationship should be
characterized as a "paper-clip" structure because they will operate as
separate public companies with independent business plans, there will be no
overlap between officers and directors of the two companies (other than one
officer of Host who will be a director but not an officer of Crestline), there
are no rights of first refusal or other similar arrangements (other than the
non-competition arrangements) with respect to future acquisitions between Host
REIT and Crestline and they expect stockholders of the two companies to
diverge over time. Crestline also will be engaged in the businesses of owning
senior living communities and asset management of hotels, neither of which
will be conducted by Host REIT. Crestline further intends to pursue leasing
opportunities for both full-service and limited-service hotels with majority
owners other than Host REIT.
 
OTHER TRANSACTIONS COMPRISING THE REIT CONVERSION
 
  In addition to the Restructuring Transactions and the Initial E&P
Distribution, the REIT Conversion includes the following additional
transactions:
 
  . Debt Refinancing. In August 1998, Host refinanced $1.55 billion of
    outstanding public bonds through offers to purchase such debt securities
    for cash and a concurrent solicitation of consents to amend the terms of
    the debt securities to facilitate the transactions constituting the REIT
    Conversion. Host obtained the funds for this Bond Refinancing primarily
    from the issuance of new debt securities and the New Credit Facility. See
    "Business and Properties--Indebtedness."
 
  . Treatment of Convertible Preferred Securities. In the REIT Conversion,
    the Operating Partnership will assume primary liability for repayment of
    the $567 million of convertible subordinated debentures of Host
    underlying the $550 million of Convertible Preferred Securities. As the
    successor to Host, Host REIT also will be liable on the debentures and
    the debentures will become convertible into Host REIT Common Stock, but
    the Operating Partnership will have primary responsibility for payment of
    the debentures, including all costs of conversion. Upon conversion by a
    Convertible Preferred Securities holder, the Operating Partnership will
    acquire Host REIT Common Stock from Host REIT in exchange for an equal
    number of OP Units and distribute the Host REIT Common Stock to the
    Convertible Preferred Securities holder. As a result of the distribution
    of Crestline common stock and any cash and other consideration to Host or
    Host REIT stockholders in connection with the Initial E&P Distribution,
    the conversion ratio of the Convertible Preferred Securities will be
    adjusted to take into account certain effects of the REIT Conversion. See
    "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results
    of Operations--Liquidity and Capital Resources."
 
  . The Partnership Mergers. Immediately following the Effective Date, each
    Partnership participating in the Partnership Mergers will merge with a
    subsidiary of the Operating Partnership. Such participating Partnerships
    will be the surviving entities of the Partnership Mergers and will
    continue in existence as indirect subsidiaries of the Operating
    Partnership. In the Partnership Mergers, each Limited Partner will
    receive a number of OP Units with a deemed value equal to the stated
    exchange value of his respective partnership interest. If a Limited
    Partner elects to receive Host REIT Common Stock or a Note in
 
                                      70

<PAGE>
 
   exchange for OP Units in connection with the Partnership Mergers, such
   Limited Partner will, upon receipt of his OP Units, tender (or be deemed
   to tender) all of such OP Units to Host REIT in exchange for an equal
   number of shares of Host REIT Common Stock or to the Operating Partnership
   in exchange for a Note with a specified principal amount. If a Limited
   Partner elects to tender his OP Units for Host REIT Common Stock or Notes,
   such Limited Partner must tender all of the OP Units he receives in the
   Partnership Mergers. The general partners of the Partnerships, each of
   which is a wholly-owned, direct or indirect subsidiary of Host, and other
   subsidiaries of Host will also receive OP Units in exchange for their
   interests in the Partnerships, and the general partners will continue as
   wholly-owned direct or indirect subsidiaries of Host REIT. Any Partnership
   that does not participate in a Partnership Merger will continue to operate
   as a separate legal entity with its own assets and liabilities and with
   its current Limited Partners. There will be no change in its investment
   objectives, policies or restrictions or the fees or distributions payable
   to the applicable general partner or Manager. Each Partnership that does
   not participate in a Partnership Merger will remain subject to the terms
   of its current partnership agreement. The Operating Partnership would
   contribute some or all of the interests in certain of these Partnerships
   that it receives from Host and its subsidiaries to a Non-Controlled
   Subsidiary. In addition, the Operating Partnership has reserved the right
   to exclude any Partnership from participation in the REIT Conversion (even
   if the requisite percentage of Limited Partners has voted to approve the
   Partnership Merger and each of the other conditions to such Partnership
   Merger has been satisfied or waived) if the Operating Partnership
   determines, in its sole discretion, that such exclusion is in the best
   interests of the Operating Partnership. Any such Partnership that is so
   excluded shall be treated as a Partnership that does not participate in a
   Partnership Merger, as described above, and its Limited Partners will
   continue to hold their respective interests in the Partnerships.
 
  . Restructuring of the Private Partnerships. The Operating Partnership will
    acquire the partnership interests from unaffiliated partners of certain
    Private Partnerships in exchange for OP Units and, accordingly, will own
    all of the interests in those Private Partnerships. For the remaining
    Private Partnerships, (i) the Operating Partnership will be a partner in
    the partnership if the unaffiliated partners consent to a lease of the
    partnership's Hotel(s) to a Lessee or (ii) if the requisite consents to
    enter into a lease are not obtained, the Operating Partnership may
    transfer its interest in such partnership to a Non-Controlled Subsidiary.
 
  . The Blackstone Acquisition. Subject to various terms and conditions, the
    Operating Partnership expects to acquire from the Blackstone Entities
    ownership of, or controlling interests in, the Blackstone Hotels. In
    addition, Host REIT will acquire a 25% interest in the Swissotel
    management company from the Blackstone Entities, which Host REIT will
    transfer to Crestline. If the Blackstone Acquisition is consummated, the
    Operating Partnership expects to issue approximately 43.7 million OP
    Units (based upon a negotiated value of $20.00 per OP Unit), assume debt
    and make cash payments totaling approximately $862 million and distribute
    up to 18% of the shares of Crestline common stock and other consideration
    to the Blackstone Entities. Fifty percent of the OP Units issued in the
    Blackstone Acquisition will become redeemable pursuant to a Unit
    Redemption Right on July 1, 1999, an additional 25% will become
    redeemable on October 1, 1999 and the balance will become redeemable on
    January 1, 2000. Holders of OP Units issued in the Blackstone Acquisition
    will have registration rights under a shelf registration statement with
    respect to Host REIT Common Stock received in connection with the
    exercise of their redemption rights.
 
     In connection with the Blackstone Acquisition, Host agreed to cause a
   person designated by Blackstone Real Estate Acquisitions L.L.C.
   ("Blackstone") to be appointed to serve as a director of Host (or a
   director of Host REIT following the Merger) and to continue to include a
   person designated by Blackstone in the slate of directors nominated by
   the Board of Directors for so long as Blackstone and its affiliates own
   at least 5% of the outstanding OP Units. Mr. Schreiber has been appointed
   to be the initial Blackstone designee. If the Blackstone Acquisition does
   not close, the Blackstone designee will resign. Host also agreed that, if
   more than two directors of Crestline also are directors of Host REIT,
   Blackstone will be entitled to designate a director of Crestline. Host
   does not expect, however, that there will be any common directors of
   Crestline and Host REIT.
 
 
                                      71

<PAGE>
 
     Host also agreed to certain limitations on sales of the properties
   acquired in the Blackstone Acquisition lasting for five years after the
   REIT Conversion for 50% of the properties and for an additional five
   years for the remaining properties.
 
     Each Blackstone Entity has agreed that, until the earlier of the fifth
   anniversary of the closing of the Blackstone Acquisition and the date on
   which the Blackstone Entities do not own, in the aggregate, more than 5%
   of the outstanding OP Units and Host REIT Common Stock, such Blackstone
   Entity will not, and will use its best efforts to cause its affiliates to
   not, directly or indirectly (i) subject to certain exceptions, acquire or
   agree to acquire beneficial ownership of any securities or partnership
   interests of Host REIT, the Operating Partnership or Crestline, if after
   giving effect thereto, such Blackstone Entity and its affiliates
   (together with the other members of any group (as defined in Section 13d-
   1 of the Exchange Act) of which any of them is part) would (A) directly
   or indirectly own more than 9.8% of any class of voting securities of
   such entity or more than 19.9% of the aggregate value of all outstanding
   voting securities of Host REIT and OP Units or (B) violate the ownership
   limitations or transfer restrictions set forth in the Host REIT Charter,
   the Partnership Agreement of the Operating Partnership or the Articles of
   Incorporation of Crestline, (ii) sell, transfer, pledge or otherwise
   dispose of any OP Units or any voting securities of Host REIT or
   Crestline in violation of such ownership limitations or transfer
   restrictions, (iii) participate in any proxy contest in opposition to the
   position taken by the directors or general partner, as applicable, of
   Host REIT, the Operating Partnership or Crestline, (iv) seek to cause a
   disposition (by way of merger, business combination, sale or otherwise)
   of a material portion of the assets or securities or partnership
   interests, or a change in the composition of the directors or management,
   of Host REIT, the Operating Partnership or Crestline or (v) initiate or
   propose to the holders of securities or partnership interests, as
   applicable, of Host REIT, the Operating Partnership or Crestline, or
   otherwise solicit their approval of, any proposal to be voted by such
   holders.
 
  . Contribution of Assets to Non-Controlled Subsidiaries. The Operating
    Partnership will organize the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries to hold various
    assets (not exceeding, in the aggregate, 20% by value of the assets of
    the Operating Partnership) contributed by Host and its subsidiaries to
    the Operating Partnership. The direct ownership of most of these assets
    by the Operating Partnership could jeopardize Host REIT's status as a
    REIT. These assets primarily will consist of partnership or other
    interests in hotels which are not leased, certain FF&E used in the Hotels
    and certain international hotels in which Host owns interests. In
    exchange for the contribution of these assets to the Non-Controlled
    Subsidiaries, the Operating Partnership will receive nonvoting common
    stock representing 95% of the total economic interests of the Non-
    Controlled Subsidiaries. In addition, the Operating Partnership and,
    prior to the Partnership Mergers, certain of the Partnerships (assuming
    they participate in the Partnership Mergers) will sell to a Non-
    Controlled Subsidiary an estimated $200 million in value of personal
    property associated with certain Hotels for notes or cash that has been
    contributed or loaned to the Non-Controlled Subsidiary by the Operating
    Partnership, or a combination thereof. The Operating Partnership could
    not lease this personal property to the Lessees without potentially
    jeopardizing Host REIT's qualification as a REIT. The Non-Controlled
    Subsidiary will lease such personal property to the applicable Lessees.
    The Host Employee Trust, a Delaware statutory business trust, and
    possibly certain other investors, will acquire all of the voting common
    stock representing the remaining 5% of the total economic interests, and
    100% of the control, of each Non-Controlled Subsidiary. The income
    beneficiaries of the Host Employee Trust will be employees of Host REIT
    eligible to participate in the Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan
    (excluding Directors of Host REIT and certain other highly compensated
    employees). Upon termination of the Host Employee Trust, the residual
    assets, if any, are to be distributed to a charitable organization
    designated in its charter.
 
  . Leases of Hotels. The Operating Partnership, its subsidiaries and its
    controlled partnerships, including the Partnerships participating in the
    Partnership Mergers, will lease virtually all of their Hotels to the
    Lessees pursuant to the Leases. See "Business and Properties--The
    Leases." The leased Hotels will be operated by the Lessees under their
    existing brand names pursuant to their existing long-term Management
    Agreements, which will be assigned to the Lessees for the terms of the
    applicable Leases but under which the Operating Partnership will remain
    obligated. See "Business and Properties--The Management Agreements."
 
                                      72

<PAGE>
 
  Following the REIT Conversion, assuming the Full Participation Scenario, the
organizational structure of Host REIT is expected to be as follows:
 
                           [FLOW CHART APPEARS HERE]
 
(1) Represents Limited Partners and others who retain OP Units and do not elect
    to receive shares of Host REIT Common Stock or Notes; excludes Host and its
    subsidiaries. Percentage ownership in the Operating Partnership assumes all
    Limited Partners in the Partnership Mergers elect to retain OP Units.
(2) Also will include Limited Partners in the Partnership Mergers who elect to
    receive shares of Host REIT Common Stock in exchange for the OP Units
    received in the Partnership Mergers. Immediately following the
    Restructuring Transactions and the distribution by Host or Host REIT of
    Crestline common stock to its stockholders and the Blackstone Entities, the
    stockholders of Crestline will consist of the stockholders of Host REIT
    (other than Limited Partners who elect to receive Host REIT Common Stock in
    connection with the Partnership Mergers) and the Blackstone Entities. The
    common ownership of the two public companies, however, will diverge over
    time.
(3) Percentage ownership in the Operating Partnership assumes no Limited
    Partners elect to receive either Host REIT Common Stock or Notes in
    connection with the Partnership Mergers and that the price per share of
    Host REIT Common Stock is $  , which is the maximum price per OP Unit for
    purposes of the Partnership Mergers.
(4) The Operating Partnership will own all or substantially all of the equity
    interests in the Partnerships participating in the Partnership Mergers,
    certain Private Partnerships and other Host subsidiaries that own Hotels,
    both directly and through other direct or indirect, wholly owned
    subsidiaries of the Operating Partnership or Host REIT. Host will
    contribute its partial equity interests in the Partnerships that do not
    participate in the Partnership Mergers and those Private Partnerships whose
    partners have not elected to exchange their interests for OP Units to the
    Operating Partnership, and the Operating Partnership will either hold such
    partial interests or contribute them to the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries.
 
                                       73

<PAGE>
 
  Ownership Interests in the Operating Partnership Following the Restructuring
Transactions and the other transactions comprising the REIT
Conversion. Following the Restructuring Transactions and the other
transactions comprising the REIT Conversion, the Operating Partnership is
expected to be owned as set forth below:
 
                    OWNERSHIP OF THE OPERATING PARTNERSHIP
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
   ENTITY                                                 PERCENTAGE INTEREST(1)
   ------                                                 ----------------------
   <S>                                                    <C>
   Host REIT.............................................          76.0%
   Limited Partners of the Partnerships..................           6.7
   Private Partnerships..................................           1.0
   Blackstone Entities...................................          16.3
                                                                  -----
     TOTAL...............................................         100.0%
                                                                  =====
</TABLE>

- --------
(1) Assumes that all Partnerships participate in the Partnership Mergers, that
    the Blackstone Acquisition is consummated, that all Limited Partners in
    the Partnership Mergers elect to retain OP Units and that the price of an
    OP Unit is $   per share, which is the maximum price per share for
    purposes of the Partnership Mergers. The percentage interest of Host REIT
    will increase, and the percentage interest of the Limited Partners will
    decrease, if Limited Partners elect to receive Host REIT Common Stock or
    Notes in exchange for their OP Units in connection with the Partnership
    Mergers.
 
 
                                      74

<PAGE>
 
                            BUSINESS AND PROPERTIES
 
BUSINESS OF THE COMPANY
 
  Host REIT was organized as a Maryland corporation on September 28, 1998 by
Host to succeed to and continue the business of Host upon consummation of the
Merger of Host with and into Host REIT pursuant to the Agreement. Host REIT
has conducted no business to date other than that incident to the Merger and
the other transactions comprising the REIT Conversion and has no material
assets or liabilities.
 
  Host REIT and the Operating Partnership have been formed primarily to
continue, in an UPREIT structure, the full-service hotel ownership business
currently conducted by Host. The primary business objectives of the Company
will be to (i) achieve long-term sustainable growth in Funds From Operations
and cash flow per share of Host REIT Common Stock, (ii) increase asset values
by improving and expanding the initial Hotels, as appropriate, (iii) acquire
additional existing and newly developed upscale and luxury full-service hotels
in targeted markets (primarily focusing on downtown hotels in core business
districts in major metropolitan markets and select airport and
resort/convention locations), (iv) develop and construct upscale and luxury
full-service hotels and (v) potentially pursue other real estate investments.
Host REIT will operate as a self-managed and self-administered REIT and its
operations will be conducted solely through the Operating Partnership and its
subsidiaries. Following the REIT Conversion, the Hotels are expected to
consist of approximately 125 hotels, representing approximately 58,500 rooms,
located throughout the United States and Canada.
 
  The Hotels will be generally operated under the Marriott, Ritz-Carlton, Four
Seasons, Swissotel and Hyatt brand names and managed by subsidiaries of
Marriott International and other companies. These brand names are among the
most respected and widely recognized brand names in the lodging industry.
Subsequent to the REIT Conversion, the Hotels will be leased by the Company to
the Lessees and will be managed on behalf of the Lessees by subsidiaries of
Marriott International and other Managers.
 
  Host REIT will be the sole general partner of the Operating Partnership and
will manage all aspects of the business of the Operating Partnership. This
will include decisions with respect to (i) sales and purchases of hotels, (ii)
the financing of the hotels, (iii) the leasing of the hotels and (iv) capital
expenditures for the hotels (subject to the terms of the leases and the
Management Agreements). Host REIT will be managed by its Board of Directors
and will have no employees who are not also employees of the Operating
Partnership.
 
  Under current federal income tax law, REITs are not permitted to derive
revenues directly from the operations of hotels. Therefore, the Company will
lease the Hotels, through its subsidiaries, to the Lessees under the Leases.
See "--The Leases" below. The Lessees will pay rent to the Company generally
equal to a specified Minimum Rent plus, to the extent it would exceed Minimum
Rent, Percentage Rent. The Lessees will operate the Hotels pursuant to the
Management Agreements with the Managers. Each of the Management Agreements
provides for certain base and incentive management fees, plus reimbursement of
certain costs, as further described below. See "--The Management Agreements."
Such fees and cost reimbursements will be the obligation of the Lessees and
not the Company (although the obligation to pay such fees could adversely
affect the ability of the Lessees to pay the required rent to the Company).
 
  The Leases, through the Percentage Rent provisions, are designed to allow
the Company to participate in any growth in room sales at the Hotels above
specified levels, which management expects can be achieved through increases
in room rates and occupancies. Although the economic trends affecting the
hotel industry will be the major factor in generating growth in lease
revenues, the abilities of the Lessees and the Managers will also have a
material impact on future sales growth.
 
  In addition to external growth generated by new acquisitions, the Company
intends to carefully and periodically review its portfolio to identify
opportunities to selectively enhance existing assets to improve operating
performance through major capital improvements. The Company's Leases will
provide the Company with the right to approve and finance major capital
improvements.
 
 
                                      75

<PAGE>
 
GENERAL
 
  The Company's primary focus is on the acquisition of upscale and luxury
full-service hotel lodging properties. Since the beginning of 1994 through the
date hereof, the Company has acquired 79 full-service hotels representing more
than 36,000 rooms for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $3.9
billion. Based upon data provided by Smith Travel Research, the Company
believes that its full-service hotels outperform the industry's average
occupancy rate by a significant margin and averaged 78.4% occupancy for 1997
compared to a 71.1% average occupancy for competing hotels in the upscale and
luxury full-service segment of the lodging industry, the segment which is most
representative of the Company's full-service hotels.
 
  The upscale and luxury full-service segments of the lodging industry are
benefiting from a favorable supply and demand relationship in the United
States, especially in the principal sub-markets in which the Company operates,
considering hotels of similar size and quality. Management believes that
demand increases have primarily resulted from a strong domestic economic
environment and a corresponding increase in business travel. In spite of
increased demand for rooms, the room supply growth rate in the full-service
segment has not similarly increased. Management believes that this slower
increase in the supply growth rate in the full-service segment is attributable
to many factors, including (i) the limited availability of attractive building
sites for full-service hotels, (ii) the lack of available financing for new
full-service hotel construction and (iii) the availability of existing full-
service properties for sale at a discount to their replacement cost. The
relatively high occupancy rates of the Company's hotels, along with increased
demand for full-service hotel rooms, have allowed the Managers of the
Company's hotels to increase average daily room rates by selectively raising
room rates and by replacing certain discounted group business with higher-rate
group and transient business. As a result, on a comparable basis, room revenue
per available room ("REVPAR") for the Company's full-service properties
increased approximately 12.6% in 1997. The Company expects this supply/demand
imbalance in the upscale and luxury full-service segments to continue, which
should result in improved REVPAR at its hotel properties in the near term;
however, there can be no assurance that such supply/demand imbalance will
continue or that REVPAR will continue to improve.
 
BUSINESS OBJECTIVES
 
  The Company's primary business objective is to increase its "Funds From
Operations" (defined as net income (or loss) computed in accordance with
generally accepted accounting principles ("GAAP"), excluding gains (or losses)
from debt restructuring and sales of properties, plus real estate related
depreciation and amortization, and after adjustments for unconsolidated
partnerships and joint ventures) per share of Host REIT Common Stock and cash
flow and enhance its value by:
 
  . Acquiring additional existing upscale and luxury full-service hotels,
    including Marriott and Ritz-Carlton hotels and other hotels operated by
    leading management companies such as Four Seasons, Hyatt and Swissotel,
    which satisfy the Company's investment criteria, including entering into
    joint ventures when the Company believes its return on investment will be
    maximized by doing so.
 
  . Developing new upscale and luxury full-service hotels, including Marriott
    and Ritz-Carlton hotels and other hotels operated by leading management
    companies such as Four Seasons, Hyatt and Swissotel, which satisfy the
    Company's investment criteria, employing transaction structures which
    mitigate risk to the Company.
 
  . Participating in the growth in sales for each of the hotels through
    leases which provide for the payment of rent based upon the lessees'
    gross hotel sales in excess of specified thresholds.
 
  . Enhancing existing hotel operations by funding selective capital
    improvements which are designed to increase gross hotel sales.
 
BUSINESS STRATEGY
 
  The Company's primary business strategy is to continue to focus on
maximizing the profitability of its existing full-service hotel portfolio and
acquiring and, in limited cases, constructing, additional high quality, full-
 
                                      76

<PAGE>
 
service hotel properties, including controlling interests in joint ventures,
partnerships or other entities holding such hotel properties. Although
competition for acquisitions has increased, the Company believes that the
upscale and luxury full-service segments of the market offer opportunities to
acquire assets at attractive multiples of cash flow and at discounts to
replacement value, including underperforming hotels which can be improved by
conversion to the Marriott or Ritz-Carlton brands. The Company believes that
the upscale and luxury full-service segments are very promising because:
 
  . There is a limited supply of new upscale and luxury full-service hotel
    rooms currently under construction in the sub-markets in which the
    Company operates. According to Smith Travel Research, from 1988 to 1991,
    upscale and luxury full-service room supply for the Company's competitive
    set increased an average of approximately 4% annually which resulted in
    an oversupply of rooms in the industry. However, this growth slowed to an
    average of approximately 1% from 1992 through 1997. Furthermore, the lead
    time from conception to completion of construction of a full-service
    hotel is generally three to five years or more in the markets in which
    the Company is principally pursuing acquisitions, which management
    believes will contribute to the continued low growth of room supply
    relative to the growth of room demand in the upscale and luxury full-
    service segments through 2000.
 
  . Many desirable hotel properties continue to be held by inadvertent owners
    such as banks, insurance companies and other financial institutions, both
    domestic and international, which are motivated and willing sellers. In
    recent years, the Company has acquired a number of properties from
    inadvertent owners at significant discounts to replacement cost,
    including luxury hotels operating under the Ritz-Carlton brand. While in
    the Company's experience to date, these sellers have been primarily U.S.
    financial organizations, the Company believes that numerous international
    financial institutions are also inadvertent owners of U.S. lodging
    properties and have only recently begun to dispose of such properties.
    The Company expects that there will be increased opportunities to acquire
    lodging properties from international financial institutions and expects
    to dedicate significant resources to aggressively pursue these
    opportunities.
 
  . The Company believes that there are numerous opportunities to improve the
    performance of acquired hotels by replacing the existing hotel manager
    with Marriott International and converting the hotel to the Marriott
    brand. Based upon data provided by Smith Travel Research, the Company
    believes that Marriott-flagged properties have consistently outperformed
    the industry. Demonstrating the strength of the Marriott brand name, the
    average occupancy rate for the Company's comparable full-service
    properties was 79.4%, compared to the average occupancy rate of 71.1% for
    competing upscale and luxury full-service hotels. In addition, the
    Company's comparable properties generated a 29% REVPAR premium over its
    competitive set. Accordingly, management anticipates that any additional
    full-service properties acquired by the Company in the future and
    converted from other brands to the Marriott brand should achieve higher
    occupancy rates and average room rates than has previously been the case
    for those properties as the properties begin to benefit from Marriott's
    brand name recognition, reservation system and group sales organization.
    The Company intends to pursue additional full-service hotel acquisitions,
    some of which may be conversion opportunities. Sixteen of the Company's
    79 acquired full-service hotels from the beginning of 1994 through the
    date hereof were converted to the Marriott brand following their
    acquisition.
 
  . The Company intends to increase its pool of potential acquisition
    candidates by considering acquisitions of select non-Marriott and non-
    Ritz-Carlton hotels that offer long-term growth potential and are
    consistent with the overall quality of its current portfolio. The Company
    will focus on upscale and luxury full-service properties in difficult to
    duplicate locations with high barriers to entry, such as hotels located
    in downtown, airport and resort/convention locations, which are operated
    by quality managers. In April 1998, the Company reached a definitive
    agreement with the Blackstone Entities to acquire interests in twelve
    upscale and luxury full-service hotels and a mortgage loan secured by a
    thirteenth hotel in the U.S. and certain other assets in a transaction
    valued at the time of the agreement, including the assumption of debt.
    The Company expects to pay approximately $862 million in cash and assumed
    debt, issue approximately 43.7 million OP Units (based upon a negotiated
    value of $20.00 per OP Unit) and
 
                                      77

<PAGE>
 
   distribute up to 18% of the shares of Crestline common stock to the
   Blackstone Entities in exchange for the assets received from the
   Blackstone Entities. The Blackstone portfolio consists of two Ritz-
   Carltons, three Four Seasons (including one in which the Company's only
   interest will be a mortgage loan), one Grand Hyatt, three Hyatt Regencies
   and four Swissotel properties. See "--Blackstone Acquisition."
 
  The Company believes it is well qualified to pursue its acquisition and
development strategy. Management has extensive experience in acquiring and
financing lodging properties and believes its industry knowledge, relationships
and access to market information provide a competitive advantage with respect
to identifying, evaluating and acquiring hotel assets.
 
  During 1997, the Company acquired, or purchased controlling interests in, 17
full-service hotels, containing 8,624 rooms, for an aggregate purchase price of
approximately $765 million (including the assumption of approximately $418
million of debt). The Company also completed the acquisition of the 504-room
New York Marriott Financial Center, following the acquisition of the mortgage
on the hotel for $101 million in late 1996.
 
  The Company holds minority interests and serves as a general partner or
limited partner in various partnerships that own, as of the date hereof, an
aggregate of 240 hotel properties, 20 of which are full-service properties,
managed or franchised by Marriott International. In 1997, the Company acquired,
or obtained controlling interests in, five affiliated partnerships, adding 10
hotels to its portfolio. In January, the Company acquired a controlling
interest in Marriott Hotel Properties Limited Partnership, a Delaware limited
partnership ("MHP"). MHP owns the 1,503-room Marriott Orlando World Center and
a 50.5% interest in the 624-room Marriott Harbor Beach Resort. In April, the
Company acquired a controlling interest in the 353-room Hanover Marriott. In
the fourth quarter, the Company acquired the Chesapeake Hotel Limited
Partnership ("CHLP"). CHLP owns the 430-room Boston Marriott Newton; the 681-
room Chicago Marriott O'Hare; the 595-room Denver Marriott Southeast; the 588-
room Key Bridge Marriott in Virginia; the 479-room Minnesota Airport Marriott;
and the 221-room Saddle Brook Marriott in New Jersey. In December 1997, the
Company obtained a controlling interest in the partnership that owns the 884-
room Marriott's Desert Springs Resort and Spa in California.
 
  In 1998, the Company acquired a controlling interest in the partnership that
owns the Atlanta Marriott Marquis, containing 1,671 rooms, for approximately
$239 million, including the assumption of approximately $164 million of
mortgage debt. The Company also acquired a controlling interest in a
partnership that owns three full-service hotels, containing a total of 1,029
rooms, for approximately $50 million and the outstanding interest in the 289-
room Park Ridge Marriott in New Jersey for $24 million. More recently, the
Company acquired the 281-room Ritz-Carlton, Phoenix for $75 million, the 397-
room Ritz-Carlton in Tysons Corner, Virginia for $96 million and the 487-room
Torrance Marriott for $52 million. In the third quarter of 1998, the Company
acquired the 308-room Ritz-Carlton, Dearborn for approximately $65 million, the
336-room Ritz-Carlton, San Francisco for approximately $161 million and the
404-room Memphis Marriott (which was converted to the Marriott brand upon
acquisition) for approximately $16 million. The Company is continually engaged
in discussions with respect to other potential acquisition properties.
 
  In addition to investments in partnerships in which it already held minority
interests, the Company has been successful in adding properties to its
portfolio through partnership arrangements with either the seller of the
property or the incoming managers (typically Marriott International or a
Marriott franchisee). During 1997, the Company acquired interests in five such
partnerships which owned five full-service hotels, including the 197-room
Waterford Hotel in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; the 404-room Norfolk Waterside
Marriott in Norfolk, Virginia; the 380-room Hartford/Farmington Marriott near
Farmington, Connecticut; the 380-room former Manhattan Beach Radisson Plaza in
Manhattan Beach, California; and the 299-room Ontario Airport Marriott in
Ontario, California. The Waterford Hotel and the Manhattan Beach Radisson Plaza
have been converted to the Marriott brand. As discussed above, in 1998, the
Company acquired a controlling interest in a partnership that owns three
hotels: the 359-room Albany Marriott in New York; the 350-room San Diego
Marriott Mission Valley in California; and the 320-room Minneapolis Marriott
Southwest in Minnesota. The Company has the financial flexibility and, due to
its existing partnership investment portfolio, the administrative
infrastructure in place to
 
                                       78

<PAGE>
 
accommodate such arrangements. The Company views this ability as a competitive
advantage and expects to enter into similar arrangements to acquire additional
properties in the future.
 
  The Company believes there is a significant opportunity to acquire
additional Ritz-Carlton hotels due to the Company's relationship with Marriott
International and due to the number of Ritz-Carlton brand hotels currently
owned by inadvertent owners. The Company also intends to purchase upscale and
luxury full-service hotels with the intention of converting them to the Ritz-
Carlton brand.
 
  The Company currently owns six international properties, with 2,550 rooms,
located in Canada and Mexico. The overbuilding and economic stress currently
being experienced in some European and Pacific Rim countries may eventually
lead to additional international acquisition opportunities. The Company will
acquire international properties only when such acquisitions achieve
satisfactory returns after adjustments for currency and country risks.
 
  In addition to acquisitions, the Company plans to selectively develop new
upscale and luxury full-service hotels in major urban markets and
convention/resort locations with strong growth prospects, unique or difficult
to duplicate sites, high barriers to entry for other new hotels and limited
new supply. The Company intends to target only development projects that show
promise of providing financial returns that represent a premium to
acquisitions. In 1997, the Company announced that it will develop the 717-room
Tampa Convention Center Marriott for $104 million, including a $16 million
subsidy provided by the City of Tampa.
 
  The Company may also expand certain existing hotel properties where strong
performance and market demand exists. Expansions to existing properties
creates a lower risk to the Company as the success of the market is generally
known and development time is significantly shorter than new construction. The
Company recently committed to add approximately 500 rooms and an additional
15,000 square feet of meeting space to the 1,503-room Marriott Orlando World
Center.
 
HOTEL LODGING INDUSTRY
 
  The upscale and luxury full-service segments of the lodging industry
continue to benefit from a favorable cyclical imbalance in the supply/demand
relationship in which room demand growth has exceeded supply growth, which has
remained fairly limited. The lodging industry posted strong gains in revenues
and profits in 1997, as demand growth continued to outpace additions to
supply. The Company believes that upscale and luxury full-service hotel room
supply growth will remain limited through at least 1998. Accordingly, the
Company believes this supply/demand imbalance will result in improving
occupancy and room rates which should result in improved REVPAR and operating
profit.
 
  Following a period of significant overbuilding in the mid-to-late 1980s, the
lodging industry experienced a severe downturn. Since 1991, new hotel
construction, excluding casino-related construction, has been modest and
largely offset by the number of rooms taken out of service each year. Due to
an increase in travel and an improving economy, hotel occupancy has grown
steadily over the past several years and room rates have improved. The Company
believes that room demand for upscale and luxury full-service properties will
continue to grow at approximately the rate of inflation. Increased room demand
should result in increased hotel occupancy and room rates. According to Smith
Travel Research, upscale and luxury full-service occupancy for the Company and
its competitive set grew in 1997 to 72.5%, while room rate growth continued to
exceed inflation. While room demand has been rising, new hotel supply growth
has been minimal. Smith Travel Research data shows that upscale and luxury
full-service room supply increased an average of only 1% annually from 1991
through 1997. According to Coopers & Lybrand, hotel supply in the upscale and
luxury full-service segment is expected to grow annually at 1.8% to 1.9%
through 1998. The increase in room demand and minimal growth in new hotel
supply has also led to increased room rates. The Company believes that these
recent trends will continue, with overall occupancy increasing slightly and
room rates increasing at more than one and one-half times the rate of
inflation in 1998.
 
 
                                      79

<PAGE>
 
  As a result of the overbuilding in the mid-to-late 1980s, many full-service
hotels have not performed as originally planned. Cash flow has often not
covered debt service requirements, causing lenders (e.g., banks, insurance
companies and savings and loans) to foreclose and become "inadvertent owners"
who are motivated to sell these assets. In the Company's experience to date,
these sellers have been primarily U.S. financial organizations. The Company
believes that numerous international financial institutions are also
inadvertent owners of lodging properties and expects there will be increased
opportunities to acquire lodging properties from international financial
institutions. While the interest of inadvertent owners to sell has created
attractive acquisition opportunities with strong current yields, the lack of
supply growth and increasing room night demand should contribute to higher
long-term returns on invested capital. Given the relatively long lead time to
develop urban, convention and resort hotels, as well as the lack of project
financing, management believes the growth in room supply in this segment will
be limited, at least until the year 2000.
 
HOTEL LODGING PROPERTIES
 
  The Company's lodging portfolio consists of 104 upscale and luxury full-
service hotels with over 50,000 rooms. The Company's hotel lodging properties
represent quality assets in the upscale and luxury full-service lodging
segments. All but three of the Company's hotel properties are currently
operated under the Marriott or Ritz-Carlton brand names.
 
                                      80

<PAGE>
 
  The following tables set forth certain information with respect to the
operations of the Hotels to be owned by the Company following the REIT
Conversion on a historical and pro forma basis for fiscal year 1997 and for
the First Two Quarters 1998.

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                  FISCAL YEAR 1997
                                                     -------------------------------------------
                                                                               AVERAGE
PARTNERSHIP               NO. OF HOTELS NO. OF ROOMS HOTEL REVENUES OCCUPANCY DAILY RATE REVPAR
- -----------               ------------- ------------ -------------- --------- ---------- -------
                                                      (IN THOUSANDS)
<S>                       <C>           <C>          <C>            <C>       <C>        <C>
Atlanta Marquis(1)......         1          1,671      $   85,397     69.8%    $127.36   $ 88.95
Chicago Suites..........         1            256           6,568     83.2      146.83    122.14
Desert Springs(2).......         1            884          33,369     73.0      169.55    123.77
Hanover.................         1            353           6,735     80.8      123.55     99.82
MDAH....................         6          1,692          26,699     76.4      102.97     78.63
MHP(3)..................         2          2,127          75,211     80.3      155.44    124.84
MHP2(4).................         4          3,411          69,014     80.7      133.75    107.91
PHLP(5).................         8          3,181          50,323     78.5      105.21     82.63
Blackstone Hotels.......        12          5,520         147,524     72.8      166.72    121.33
Host (historical)(6)....        95         45,718         946,726     78.4      133.74    104.84
Host (pro forma)(6)(7)..       126         58,603       1,324,601     77.7      133.01    103.30
<CAPTION>
                                                 FIRST TWO QUARTERS 1998
                          ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                               AVERAGE
PARTNERSHIP               NO. OF HOTELS NO. OF ROOMS HOTEL REVENUES OCCUPANCY DAILY RATE REVPAR
- -----------               ------------- ------------ -------------- --------- ---------- -------
                                                      (IN THOUSANDS)
<S>                       <C>           <C>          <C>            <C>       <C>        <C>
Atlanta Marquis(1)......         1          1,671      $   41,957     69.1%    $138.66   $ 95.81
Chicago Suites..........         1            256           3,358     82.0      159.98    131.18
Desert Springs(2).......         1            884          65,051     79.7      214.47    170.93
Hanover.................         1            353           3,391     71.5      142.62    101.97
MDAH....................         6          1,692          14,521     77.0      114.66     88.29
MHP(3)..................         2          2,127          47,968     85.0      176.75    150.24
MHP2(4).................         4          3,411          37,946     80.4      152.56    122.66
PHLP(5).................         8          3,181          29,480     81.1      117.81     95.54
Blackstone Hotels.......        12          5,520          79,346     72.0      175.53    126.41
Host (historical)(6)....       101         49,019         577,472     78.6      145.04    114.02
Host (pro forma)(6)(7)..       126         58,603         715,360     77.8      146.18    113.67
</TABLE>

- --------
(1) Atlanta Marquis has an 80% residual interest in the Atlanta Marriott
    Marquis Hotel. Revenues represents sales generated by the Hotel.
(2) Subsequent to November 25, 1997, revenues reflect gross hotel sales. Prior
    to that date, revenues reflected hotel rental income.
(3) Includes Marriott's Harbor Beach Resort, in which MHP owns a 50.5%
    interest.
(4) Includes the Santa Clara Marriott, in which MHP2 owns a 50% interest and
    Host owns the remaining 50% interest.
(5) Includes the Tampa Westshore Marriott and the Raleigh Crabtree Marriott,
    which are currently consolidated by Host. A subsidiary of Host provided
    100% nonrecourse financing totaling approximately $35 million to PHLP, in
    which Host owns the sole general partner interest, for the acquisition of
    these two hotels.
(6) Includes the hotels owned by Desert Springs, Hanover, MHP and MHP2 for
    both fiscal year 1997 and First Two Quarters 1998 and Atlanta Marquis for
    First Two Quarters 1998.
(7) Includes the hotels owned by all Partnerships and Private Partnerships and
    the Blackstone Hotels, assuming the Full Participation Scenario.
 
  One commonly used indicator of market performance for hotels is room revenue
per available room, or REVPAR, which measures daily room revenues generated on
a per room basis. This does not include food and beverage or other ancillary
revenues generated by the property. REVPAR represents the combination of the
average daily room rate charged and the average daily occupancy achieved. The
Company has reported annual increases in REVPAR since 1993.
 
  To maintain the overall quality of the Company's lodging properties, each
property undergoes refurbishments and capital improvements on a regularly
scheduled basis. Typically, refurbishing has been provided at intervals of
five years, based on an annual review of the condition of each property. For
the First
 
                                      81

<PAGE>
 
Two Quarters 1998, First Two Quarters 1997, fiscal years 1997, 1996 and 1995,
the Company spent $79 million, $60 million, $131 million, $87 million and $56
million, respectively, on capital improvements to existing properties. As a
result of these expenditures, the Company will be able to maintain high
quality rooms at its properties.
 
  The Company's hotels average nearly 500 rooms. Twelve of the Company's
hotels have more than 750 rooms. Hotel facilities typically include meeting
and banquet facilities, a variety of restaurants and lounges, swimming pools,
gift shops and parking facilities. The Company's hotels primarily serve
business and pleasure travelers and group meetings at locations in downtown
and suburban areas, near airports and at resort convention locations
throughout the United States. The properties are generally well situated in
locations where there are significant barriers to entry by competitors
including downtown areas of major metropolitan cities at airports and
resort/convention locations where there are limited or no development sites.
Marriott International serves as the manager for 88 of the 104 hotels owned by
the Company and all but three are part of Marriott International's full-
service hotel system. The average age of the properties is 15 years, although
several of the properties have had substantial, more recent renovations or
major additions. In 1997, for example, the Company substantially completed a
two-year $30 million capital improvement program at the New York Marriott
Marquis which included renovations to all guestrooms, refurbishment of
ballrooms, restaurant updates and retail additions. In early 1998, the Company
completed a $15 million capital improvement program at the Denver Marriott
Tech Center. The program included replacement of guestroom interiors,
remodeling of the lobby, ballroom, meeting rooms and corridors, as well as
renovations to the exterior of the building.
 
  The chart below sets forth performance information for the Company's
comparable hotels:
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                         FIRST TWO QUARTERS      FISCAL YEAR
                                         --------------------  ----------------
                                           1998       1997      1997     1996
                                         ---------  ---------  -------  -------
<S>                                      <C>        <C>        <C>      <C>
COMPARABLE FULL-SERVICE HOTELS(1)
Number of properties....................        78         78       54       54
Number of rooms.........................    38,589     38,589   27,074   27,044
Average daily rate...................... $  146.64  $  135.21  $134.49  $121.58
Occupancy percentage....................      79.6%      79.8%    79.4%    78.0%
REVPAR.................................. $  116.66  $  107.85  $106.76  $ 94.84
REVPAR % change.........................       8.2%       --      12.6%     --
</TABLE>

- --------
(1) Consists of the 78 properties owned by the Company for the entire First
    Two Quarters 1998 and First Two Quarters 1997, respectively, and the 54
    properties owned by the Company for the entire 1997 and 1996 fiscal years,
    respectively, except for the 85-room Sacramento property, which is
    operated as an independent hotel. These properties, for the respective
    periods, represent the "comparable properties." Properties held for less
    than all of the periods discussed above, respectively, are not considered
    comparable.
 
  The chart below sets forth certain performance information for the Company's
hotels:
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                FIRST TWO QUARTERS          FISCAL YEAR
                                --------------------  -------------------------
                                  1998       1997      1997     1996     1995
                                ---------  ---------  -------  -------  -------
<S>                             <C>        <C>        <C>      <C>      <C>
Number of properties...........       101         86       95       79       55
Number of rooms................    49,019     40,387   45,718   37,210   25,932
Average daily rate(1).......... $  145.04  $  135.74  $133.74  $119.94  $110.30
Occupancy percentage(1)........      78.6%      79.7%    78.4%    77.3%    75.5%
REVPAR(1)...................... $  114.02  $  108.15  $104.84  $ 92.71  $ 83.32
</TABLE>

- --------
(1) Excludes the information related to the 85-room Sacramento property, which
    is operated as an independent hotel.
 
  Revenues in 1997 for nearly all of the Company's hotels were improved or
comparable to 1996. This improvement was achieved through steady increases in
customer demand, as well as yield management techniques applied by the manager
to maximize REVPAR on a property-by-property basis. REVPAR for comparable
properties increased 12.6% for fiscal year 1997 as average room rates
increased almost 11% and
 
                                      82

<PAGE>
 
average occupancy increased over one percentage point. Overall, this resulted
in outstanding sales growth. Sales expanded at a 9% rate for comparable hotels
and house profit margins increased by over two percentage points. REVPAR in
1997 for all of the Company's properties (including both comparable and non-
comparable properties) increased 12.9% as average room rates increased over
11% and average occupancy increased over one percentage point. For the First
Two Quarters 1998, REVPAR for comparable properties increased 8.2% as average
room rates increased 8.5% and average occupancy decreased slightly. Sales for
the First Two Quarters 1998 expanded at 9% rate for comparable hotels and the
house profit margin increased by one percentage point. REVPAR for the First
Two Quarters of 1998 for all of the Company's properties increased 5.4% as
average room rates increased nearly 7% and average occupancy decreased over
one percentage point. The Company believes that its hotels consistently
outperform the industry's average REVPAR growth rates. The relatively high
occupancy rates of the Company's hotels, along with increased demand for
upscale and luxury full-service hotel rooms, allowed the managers of the
Company's hotels to increase average room rates by selectively raising room
rates and replacing certain discounted group business with higher-rate group
and transient business. The Company believes that these favorable REVPAR
growth trends should continue due to the limited new construction of full-
service properties and the expected improvements from the conversion of seven
properties to the Marriott brand in 1996 and 1997.
 
  A number of the Company's full-service hotel acquisitions were converted to
the Marriott brand upon acquisition--most recently the Coronado Island
Marriott Resort and the Manhattan Beach Marriott were converted in the second
half of 1997. The conversion of these properties to the Marriott brand is
intended to increase occupancy and room rates as a result of Marriott
International's nationwide marketing and reservation systems, its Marriott
Rewards program, group sales force, as well as customer recognition of the
Marriott brand name. The Marriott brand name has consistently delivered
occupancy and REVPAR premiums over other brands. Based upon data provided by
Smith Travel Research, the Company's comparable properties have an eight
percentage point occupancy premium and a 29% REVPAR premium over its
competitive set for 1997. The Company actively manages the conversions and, in
many cases, has worked closely with the manager to selectively invest in
enhancements to the physical product to make the property more attractive to
guests or more efficient to operate. The invested capital with respect to
these properties is primarily used for the improvement of common areas, as
well as upgrading soft and hard goods (i.e., carpets, drapes, paint, furniture
and additional amenities). The conversion process typically causes periods of
disruption to these properties as selected rooms and common areas are
temporarily taken out of service. Historically, the conversion properties have
shown improvements as the benefits of Marriott International's marketing and
reservation programs, group sales force and customer service initiatives take
hold. In addition, these properties have generally been integrated into
Marriott International's systems covering purchasing and distribution,
insurance, telecommunications and payroll processing.
 
  Following the REIT Conversion, the Lessees and the Managers will continue to
focus on cost control in an attempt to ensure that hotel sales increases serve
to maximize house and operating profit. While control of fixed costs serves to
improve profit margins as hotel sales increase, it also results in more
properties reaching financial performance levels that allow the Managers to
share in the growth of profits in the form of incentive management fees. The
Company believes this is a positive development as it strengthens the
alignment of the Company's, the Lessees' and the Managers' interests.
 
  During 1996, the Company completed its divestiture of limited service
properties through the sale and leaseback of 16 Courtyard and 18 Residence Inn
properties. These properties, along with 37 Courtyard properties sold and
leased back during 1995, continue to be reflected in the Company's revenues
and are managed by Marriott International under long-term management
agreements. Following the REIT Conversion, these properties will be subleased
to a subsidiary of Crestline. During 1997, limited service properties
represented 2% of the Company's hotel EBITDA, compared to 5% in 1996, and the
Company expects this percentage to continue to decrease as the Company
continues to acquire primarily full-service properties.
 
                                      83

<PAGE>
 
  The following table presents full-service hotel information by geographic
region for fiscal year 1997:
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                        AGGREGATE
                                   AVERAGE                              COMPLETED
                                    NUMBER            AVERAGE           RENOVATION
                          NUMBER   OF GUEST  AVERAGE   DAILY           EXPENDITURES
GEOGRAPHIC REGION        OF HOTELS  ROOMS   OCCUPANCY  RATE   REVPAR  (IN THOUSANDS)
- -----------------        --------- -------- --------- ------- ------- --------------
<S>                      <C>       <C>      <C>       <C>     <C>     <C>
Atlanta.................      7      441      76.5%   $131.69 $100.74    $ 4,115
Florida.................     11      511      80.9     131.78  106.64     14,007
Mid-Atlantic............     12      364      76.1     111.71   85.00      3,477
Midwest.................     10      418      74.3     107.65   79.99      2,751
New York................     10      708      84.7     173.85  147.22     15,232
Northeast...............      7      367      75.2      96.75   72.72      9,260
South Central...........     15      525      76.5     120.81   92.39     15,190
Western.................     21      519      79.5     140.07  111.39     19,806
Latin America...........      2      436      62.7     129.54   81.17        290
  Average-all regions...    --       485      78.4     133.74  104.84        --
</TABLE>

 
                                       84

<PAGE>
 
HOTEL PROPERTIES
 
  The following table sets forth, as of September 28, 1998, the location and
number of rooms relating to each of the Company's hotels. All of the properties
are operated under Marriott brands by Marriott International, unless otherwise
indicated.

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
LOCATION                                                                   ROOMS
- --------                                                                   -----
<S>                                                                        <C>
Alabama
 Grand Hotel Resort and Golf Club.........................................   306
Arizona
 Scottsdale Suites........................................................   251
 The Ritz-Carlton, Phoenix (1)............................................   281
California
 Coronado Island Resort (2)(6)............................................   300
 Costa Mesa Suites........................................................   253
 Desert Springs Resort and Spa (3)(4).....................................   884
 Manhattan Beach (5)(6)...................................................   380
 Marina Beach (6).........................................................   368
 Newport Beach............................................................   570
 Newport Beach Suites.....................................................   250
 Ontario Airport (7)......................................................   299
 Sacramento Airport (6)(8)................................................    85
 San Diego Marriott Hotel and Marina (6).................................. 1,355
 San Diego Mission Valley (9).............................................   350
 San Francisco Airport....................................................   684
 San Francisco Fisherman's Wharf (10).....................................   285
 San Francisco Moscone Center (6)......................................... 1,498
 San Ramon (6)............................................................   368
 Santa Clara (6)..........................................................   754
 The Ritz-Carlton, Marina del Rey (1)(6)(11)..............................   306
 The Ritz-Carlton, San Francisco (1)......................................   336
 Torrance.................................................................   487
Colorado
 Denver Southeast (6)(12).................................................   595
 Denver Tech Center.......................................................   625
 Denver West (6)..........................................................   307
 Marriott's Mountain Resort at Vail.......................................   349
Connecticut
 Hartford/Farmington (7)..................................................   380
 Hartford/Rocky Hill (6)..................................................   251
Florida
 Fort Lauderdale Marina...................................................   580
 Harbor Beach Resort (3)(4)(6)............................................   624
 Jacksonville (6)(9)......................................................   256
 Miami Airport (6)........................................................   782
 Orlando World Center (3)(4).............................................. 1,503
 Palm Beach Gardens (6)(10)...............................................   279
 Singer Island (Holiday Inn) (8)..........................................   222
 Tampa Airport (6)........................................................   295
 Tampa Westshore (6)(13)..................................................   309
 The Ritz-Carlton, Naples (1).............................................   463
Georgia
 Atlanta Marriott Marquis (3)(4).......................................... 1,671
 Atlanta Midtown Suites (6)...............................................   254
 Atlanta Norcross.........................................................   222
 Atlanta Northwest........................................................   400
 Atlanta Perimeter (6)....................................................   400
 JW Marriott Hotel at Lenox (6)...........................................   371
 The Ritz-Carlton, Atlanta (1)............................................   447
 The Ritz-Carlton, Buckhead (1)...........................................   553
Illinois
 Chicago/Deerfield Suites.................................................   248
</TABLE>


<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
LOCATION                                                                   ROOMS
- --------                                                                   -----
<S>                                                                        <C>
 Chicago/Downers Grove Suites.............................................   254
 Chicago/Downtown Courtyard...............................................   334
 Chicago O'Hare (6)(12)...................................................   681
Indiana
 South Bend (6)...........................................................   300
Louisiana
 New Orleans (4).......................................................... 1,290
Maryland
 Bethesda (6).............................................................   407
 Gaithersburg/Washingtonian Center........................................   284
Massachusetts
 Boston/Newton (3)........................................................   430
Michigan
 Detroit Romulus..........................................................   245
 The Ritz Carlton, Dearborn (1)...........................................   306
Minnesota
 Minneapolis/Bloomington (12).............................................   479
 Minneapolis City Center (6)..............................................   583
 Minneapolis Southwest (9)................................................   320
Missouri
 Kansas City Airport (6)..................................................   382
 St. Louis Pavilion (6)...................................................   672
New Hampshire
 Nashua...................................................................   251
New Jersey
 Hanover (3)(4)...........................................................   353
 Newark Airport (6).......................................................   590
 Park Ridge (6)...........................................................   289
 Saddle Brook (6)(12).....................................................   221
New York
 Albany (9)...............................................................   359
 New York Marriott Financial Center (14)..................................   504
 New York Marriott Marquis (6)............................................ 1,911
 Marriott World Trade Center (6)..........................................   820
North Carolina
 Charlotte Executive Park (10)............................................   298
 Raleigh Crabtree Valley (13).............................................   375
Oklahoma
 Oklahoma City............................................................   354
 Oklahoma City Waterford (5)..............................................   197
Oregon
 Portland.................................................................   503
Pennsylvania
 Philadelphia (Convention Center) (6)..................................... 1,200
 Philadelphia Airport (6).................................................   419
 Pittsburgh City Center (6)(10)...........................................   400
</TABLE>

 
                                       85

<PAGE>
 
HOTEL PROPERTIES (CONTINUED)

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
LOCATION                                                                  ROOMS
- --------                                                                  ------
<S>                                                                       <C>
Tennessee
 Memphis (2)(6).........................................................     404
Texas
 Dallas/Fort Worth......................................................     492
 Dallas Quorum (6)......................................................     547
 El Paso (6)............................................................     296
 Houston Airport (6)....................................................     566
 JW Marriott Houston (6)................................................     503
 Plaza San Antonio (6)(10)..............................................     252
 San Antonio Rivercenter (4)(6).........................................     999
 San Antonio Riverwalk (6)..............................................     500
Utah
 Salt Lake City (6).....................................................     510
Virginia
 Dulles Airport (6).....................................................     370
 Key Bridge (6)(12).....................................................     588
 Norfolk Waterside (6)(7)...............................................     404
 Pentagon City Residence Inn............................................     300
 The Ritz-Carlton, Tysons Corner (6)....................................     397
 Washington Dulles Suites...............................................     254
 Westfields.............................................................     335
 Williamsburg...........................................................     295
Washington, D.C.
 Washington Metro Center................................................     456
Canada
 Calgary................................................................     380
 Toronto Airport (15)...................................................     423
 Toronto Eaton Centre (6)...............................................     459
 Toronto Delta Meadowvale (8)...........................................     374
Mexico
 Mexico City Airport (15)...............................................     600
 JW Marriott Hotel, Mexico City (15)....................................     314
                                                                          ------
 TOTAL..................................................................  50,067
                                                                          ======
</TABLE>

  Properties that are currently not consolidated by Host and are subject to
the Partnership Mergers ("MDAH" refers to Marriott Diversified America Hotels,
L.P., a Delaware limited partnership; "Chicago Suites" refers to Mutual
Benefit Chicago Marriott Suite Hotel Partners, L.P., a Rhode Island limited
partnership; and "PHLP" refers to Potomac Hotel Limited Partnership, a
Delaware limited partnership):

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
HOTEL                                                       STATE          ROOMS
- -----                                                       -----          -----
<S>                                                         <C>            <C>
MDAH
 Fairview Park (6)......................................... Virginia         395
 Dayton.................................................... Ohio             399
 Research Triangle Park.................................... North Carolina   224
 Detroit Marriott Southfield............................... Michigan         226
 Detroit Marriott Livonia.................................. Michigan         224
 Fullerton (6)............................................. California       224
                                                                           -----
                                                                           1,692
                                                                           -----
Chicago Suites
 Marriott O'Hare Suites (6)................................ Illinois         256
                                                                           -----
PHLP
 Albuquerque (6)........................................... New Mexico       411
 Greensboro-High Point (6)................................. North Carolina   299
 Houston Medical Center (6)................................ Texas            386
 Miami Biscayne Bay (6).................................... Florida          605
 Marriott Mountain Shadows Resort.......................... Arizona          337
 Seattle SeaTac Airport.................................... Washington       459
                                                                           -----
                                                                           2,497
                                                                           -----
 TOTAL.................................................................... 4,445
</TABLE>

  Properties that are included in the Blackstone portfolio are as follows:
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
HOTEL                                                       STATE         ROOMS
- -----                                                       -----         -----
<S>                                                         <C>           <C>
Four Seasons, Atlanta...................................... Georgia         246
Four Seasons, Philadelphia................................. Pennsylvania    365
Grand Hyatt, Atlanta....................................... Georgia         439
Hyatt Regency, Burlingame.................................. California      793
Hyatt Regency, Cambridge................................... Massachusetts   469
Hyatt Regency, Reston...................................... Virginia        514
Swissotel, Atlanta......................................... Georgia         348
Swissotel, Boston.......................................... Massachusetts   498
Swissotel, Chicago......................................... Illinois        630
The Drake (Swissotel), New York............................ New York        494
The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island............................ Florida         449
The Ritz-Carlton, Boston (1)............................... Massachusetts   275
                                                                          -----
 TOTAL................................................................... 5,520
                                                                          =====
</TABLE>

- --------
 (1) Property is operated as a Ritz-Carlton. The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company,
     L.L.C. manages the property and is wholly owned by Marriott
     International.
 (2) This property was acquired by the Company and converted to the Marriott
     brand in 1997 or 1998.
 (3) The Company acquired a controlling interest in the partnership that owns
     this property in 1997 or 1998. The Company previously owned a general
     partner interest in the partnership.
 (4) Property is held within a partnership and is currently consolidated by
     Host.
 (5) The Company acquired a controlling interest in the newly-formed
     partnership that owns this property in 1997. The property was converted
     to the Marriott brand and is operated as a Marriott franchised property.
 (6) The land on which the hotel is built is leased under one or more long-
     term lease agreements.
 (7) The Company acquired a controlling interest in the newly-formed
     partnership that owns this property in 1997. The property is operated as
     a Marriott franchised property.
 (8) Property is not operated under the Marriott brand and is not managed by
     Marriott International.
 (9) The Company acquired a controlling interest in the partnership that owns
     this property in 1998. The property will be operated as a Marriott
     franchised property.
(10) Property is operated as a Marriott franchised property.
(11) Property was acquired by the Company in 1997.
(12) The Company acquired the partnership that owns this property in 1997. The
     Company previously owned a general partner interest in the partnership.
 
                                      86

<PAGE>
 
(13) Property is owned by PHLP. A subsidiary of the Company provided 100% non-
     recourse financing totaling approximately $35 million to PHLP, in which
     the Company owns the sole general partner interest, for the acquisition
     of these two hotels. The Company consolidates these properties in the
     accompanying financial statements.
(14) The Company completed the acquisition of this property in early 1997. The
     Company previously had purchased the mortgage loan secured by the hotel
     in late 1996.
(15) Property will be transferred to the Non-Controlled Subsidiary in
     conjunction with the REIT Conversion and no longer consolidated by the
     Company.
 
1998 ACQUISITIONS
 
  In January 1998, the Company acquired an additional interest in Atlanta
Marriott Marquis II Limited Partnership, a Delaware limited partnership, which
owns an interest in the 1,671-room Atlanta Marriott Marquis Hotel, for
approximately $239 million, including the assumption of approximately $164
million of mortgage debt. The Company previously owned a 1.3% general and
limited partnership interest. In March 1998, the Company acquired a
controlling interest in the partnership that owns three hotels: the 359-room
Albany Marriott, the 350-room San Diego Marriott Mission Valley and the 320-
room Minneapolis Marriott Southwest for approximately $50 million. In the
second quarter of 1998, the Company acquired the partnership that owns the
289-room Park Ridge Marriott in Park Ridge, New Jersey for $24 million. The
Company previously owned a 1% managing general partner interest and a note
receivable interest in such partnership. In addition, the Company acquired the
281-room Ritz-Carlton, Phoenix for $75 million, the 397-room Ritz-Carlton in
Tysons Corner, Virginia for $96 million and the 487-room Torrance Marriott
near Los Angeles, California for $52 million. In the third quarter of 1998,
the Company acquired the 308-room Ritz-Carlton, Dearborn for approximately $65
million, the 336-room Ritz-Carlton, San Francisco for approximately $161
million and the 404-room Memphis Crowne Plaza (which was converted to the
Marriott brand upon acquisition) for approximately $16 million. In April 1998,
the Company, through the Operating Partnership, entered into an agreement to
acquire certain assets from various affiliates of The Blackstone Group. See
"--Blackstone Acquisition."
 
BLACKSTONE ACQUISITION
 
  In April 1998, the Company reached a definitive agreement with the
Blackstone Entities to acquire ownership of, or controlling interests in,
twelve hotels and two mortgage loans, one secured by one of the acquired
hotels and one secured by an additional hotel. In addition, the Company will
acquire a 25% interest in the Swissotel management company from the Blackstone
Entities, which the Company will transfer to Crestline in connection with the
Initial E&P Distribution of Crestline common stock to the Company's
stockholders and the Blackstone Entities. If the Blackstone Acquisition is
consummated, the Operating Partnership expects to issue approximately 43.7
million OP Units (based upon a negotiated value of $20.00 per OP Unit), assume
debt and make cash payments totaling approximately $862 million and distribute
up to 18% of the shares of Crestline common stock and other consideration to
the Blackstone Entities. The consideration received by the Blackstone Entities
was determined through negotiations between the Company and Blackstone and was
not based upon appraisals of the assets. Each OP Unit will be exchangeable for
one share of Host REIT Common Stock (or its cash equivalent, at the Company's
election). Upon completion of the Blackstone Acquisition and the REIT
Conversion, the Blackstone Entities will own approximately 16.0% of the
outstanding OP Units. John G. Schreiber, co-chairman of the Blackstone Real
Estate Partners' investment committee, has joined the Board of Directors of
the Company.
 
  The Blackstone portfolio is one of the premier collections of hotel real
estate properties. It includes: The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island (449 rooms);
The Ritz-Carlton, Boston (275 rooms); Hyatt Regency Burlingame at San
Francisco Airport (793 rooms); Hyatt Regency Cambridge, Boston (469 rooms);
Hyatt Regency Reston, Virginia (514 rooms); Grand Hyatt Atlanta (439 rooms);
Four Seasons Philadelphia (365 rooms); Four Seasons Atlanta (246 rooms); The
Drake (Swissotel) New York (494 rooms); Swissotel Chicago (630 rooms);
Swissotel Boston (498 rooms) and Swissotel Atlanta (348 rooms). Additionally,
the transaction includes: the first mortgage loan on the Four Seasons Beverly
Hills (285 rooms); two office buildings in Atlanta--the offices at The Grand
(97,879 sq. ft.) and the offices at the Swissotel (67,110 sq. ft.); and a 25%
interest in the Swissotel U.S. management company (which will be transferred
to Crestline).
 
 
                                      87

<PAGE>
 
  At the closing of the Blackstone Acquisition, the Blackstone portfolio will
be contributed to the Company and its hotels will be leased to subsidiaries of
Crestline and will continue to be managed on behalf of the Lessees under their
existing management agreements. The Company's acquisition of the Blackstone
portfolio is subject to certain conditions, including the REIT Conversion
being consummated by March 31, 1999 and Host REIT qualifying as a REIT for
1999 (which condition may not be satisfied if the REIT Conversion is not
completed by January 1, 1999).
 
INVESTMENTS IN AFFILIATED PARTNERSHIPS
 
  The Company and certain of its subsidiaries also manage the Company's
partnership investments and conduct the partnership services business. As
such, as of the date hereof, the Company and/or its subsidiaries own an
investment in, and generally serve as a general partner or managing general
partner for, 18 unconsolidated partnerships which collectively own 20 Marriott
full-service hotels, 120 Courtyard hotels, 50 Residence Inns and 50 Fairfield
Inns. In addition, the Company holds notes receivable (net of reserves) from
partnerships totaling approximately $23 million at January 2, 1998. Thirteen
of the 20 full-service hotels owned by the unconsolidated partnerships will be
acquired by the Company in connection with the REIT Conversion.
 
  As the managing general partner of these partnerships, the Company and its
subsidiaries are responsible for the day-to-day management of partnership
operations, which includes payment of partnership obligations from partnership
funds, preparation of financial reports and tax returns and communications
with lenders, limited partners and regulatory bodies. The Company or its
subsidiaries are usually reimbursed for the cost of providing these services.
 
  Hotel properties owned by the unconsolidated partnerships generally were
acquired from the Company or its subsidiaries in connection with limited
partnership offerings. These hotel properties are currently operated under
management agreements with Marriott International. As the managing general
partner of such partnerships, the Company or its subsidiaries oversee and
monitor Marriott International's performance pursuant to these agreements.
 
  The Company's interests in these partnerships range from 1% to 50%. Cash
distributions provided from these partnerships are tied to the overall
performance of the underlying properties and the overall level of debt owed by
the partnership. Partnership distributions to the Company were $1 million for
the First Two Quarters 1998, $4 million for the First Two Quarters 1997, $5
million in each of 1997 and 1996 and $3 million in 1995. All partnership debt
is nonrecourse to the Company and its subsidiaries, except that the Company is
contingently liable under various guarantees of debt obligations of certain of
these partnerships. Such commitments are limited in the aggregate to $60
million at January 2, 1998. Subsequent to year-end, such maximum commitments
were reduced to $20 million in connection with the refinancing and acquisition
of a controlling interest in the Atlanta Marriott Marquis. In most cases,
fundings of such guarantees represent loans to the respective partnerships.
 
MARKETING
 
  As of September 28, 1998, 88 of the Company's 104 hotel properties are
managed by Marriott International as Marriott or Ritz-Carlton brand hotels.
Thirteen of the 16 remaining hotels are operated as Marriott brand hotels
under franchise agreements with Marriott International. The Company believes
that these Marriott-managed and franchised properties will continue to enjoy
competitive advantages arising from their participation in the Marriott
International hotel system. Marriott International's nationwide marketing
programs and reservation systems as well as the advantage of the strong
customer preference for Marriott brands should also help these properties to
maintain or increase their premium over competitors in both occupancy and room
rates. Repeat guest business in the Marriott hotel system is enhanced by the
Marriott Rewards program, which expanded the previous Marriott Honored Guest
Awards program. Marriott Rewards membership includes more than 7.5 million
members.
 
  The Marriott reservation system provides Marriott reservation agents
complete descriptions of the rooms available for sale and up-to-date rate
information from the properties. The reservation system also features
 
                                      88

<PAGE>
 
connectivity to airline reservation systems, providing travel agents with
access to available rooms inventory for all Marriott and Ritz-Carlton lodging
properties. In addition, software at Marriott's centralized reservations
centers enables agents to immediately identify the nearest Marriott or Ritz-
Carlton brand property with available rooms when a caller's first choice is
fully occupied.
 
COMPETITION
 
  The Company's hotels compete with several other major lodging brands in each
segment in which they operate. Competition in the industry is based primarily
on the level of service, quality of accommodations, convenience of locations
and room rates. Although the competitive position of each of the Company's
hotel properties differs from market to market, the Company believes that its
properties compare favorably to their competitive set in the markets in which
they operate on the basis of these factors. The following table presents key
participants in segments of the lodging industry in which the Company
competes:
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                SEGMENT                       REPRESENTATIVE PARTICIPANTS
                -------                       ---------------------------
 <C>                                   <S>
  Luxury Full-Service................. Ritz-Carlton; Four Seasons
  Upscale Full-Service................ Crowne Plaza; Doubletree; Hyatt; Hilton;
                                       Marriott Hotels, Resorts andSuites;
                                       Radisson; Red Lion; Sheraton; Swissotel;
                                       Westin; Wyndham
</TABLE>

 
RELATIONSHIP WITH HM SERVICES
 
  On December 29, 1995, the Company distributed to its stockholders through a
special dividend (the "Special Dividend") all of the outstanding shares of
common stock of Host Marriott Services Corporation ("HM Services"), formerly a
direct, wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company which, as of the date of the
Special Dividend, owned and operated the food, beverage and merchandise
concessions at airports, on tollroads and at stadiums and arenas and other
tourist attractions. The Special Dividend provided Company stockholders with
one share of common stock of HM Services for every five shares of Company
common stock held by such stockholders on the record date of December 22,
1995.
 
  For the purpose of governing certain of the ongoing relationships between
the Company and HM Services after the Special Dividend, and to provide an
orderly transition, the Company and HM Services have entered into various
agreements, including agreements to (i) allocate certain responsibilities with
respect to employee compensation, benefit and labor matters; (ii) define the
respective parties' rights and obligations with respect to deficiencies and
refunds of federal, state and other income or franchise taxes relating to the
Company's businesses for tax years prior to the Special Dividend and with
respect to certain tax attributes of the Company after the Special Dividend;
(iii) provide certain administrative and other support services to each other
for a transitional period on an as-needed basis and (iv) to provide for the
issuance of HM Services common stock in connection with the exercise of
certain outstanding warrants to purchase shares of Company common stock.
 
RELATIONSHIP WITH MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL; MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTION
 
  Prior to October 8, 1993, the Company was named "Marriott Corporation." In
addition to conducting its existing hotel ownership business and the business
of HM Services (prior to its distribution to stockholders through the Special
Dividend), Marriott Corporation engaged in lodging and senior living services
management, timeshare resort development and operation, food service and
facilities management and other contract services businesses (the "Management
Business"). On October 8, 1993, the Company completed the Marriott
International Distribution (as defined herein). Marriott International
conducts the Management Business as a separate publicly traded company.
 
  The Company and Marriott International have entered into agreements which
provide, among other things, for Marriott International to (i) manage or
franchise various hotel properties owned or leased by the Company, (ii)
advance up to $225 million to the Company under the Marriott International
line of credit, which was
 
                                      89

<PAGE>
 
terminated in 1997, (iii) provide first mortgage financing of $109 million for
the Philadelphia Marriott Hotel, which was repaid in December 1996, (iv)
provide financing for certain Company acquisitions, (v) guarantee the
Company's performance in connection with certain loans or other obligations
and (vi) provide certain limited administrative services. The Company views
its relationship with Marriott International as providing various advantages,
including access to high quality management services, strong brand names and
superior marketing and reservation systems.
 
  Marriott International has the right to purchase up to 20% of the voting
stock of the Company if certain events involving a change of control (or
potential change of control) of the Company occur, subject to certain
limitations (including a limitation effective after the REIT Conversion
intended to help protect the qualification of Host REIT as a REIT). See
"Certain Relationships and Related Transactions--Relationship Between Host and
Marriott International."
 
EMPLOYEES
 
  Currently, the Company and its subsidiaries collectively have approximately
225 corporate employees, and approximately 300 other employees (primarily
employed at one of its non-U.S. hotels) which are covered by collective
bargaining agreements that are subject to review and renewal on a regular
basis. The Company believes that it has good relations with its labor unions
and has not experienced any material business interruptions as a result of
labor disputes. Following the REIT Conversion, the Company expects to have 175
employees. The balance of the Company's current employees are expected to
become employees of Crestline following the REIT Conversion.
 
ENVIRONMENTAL AND REGULATORY MATTERS
 
  Under various federal, state and local environmental laws, ordinances and
regulations, a current or previous owner or operator of real property may be
liable for the costs of removal or remediation of hazardous or toxic
substances on, under or in such property. Such laws may impose liability
whether or not the owner or operator knew of, or was responsible for, the
presence of such hazardous or toxic substances. In addition, certain
environmental laws and common law principles could be used to impose liability
for release of asbestos-containing materials ("ACMs"), and third parties may
seek recovery from owners or operators of real properties for personal injury
associated with exposure to released ACMs. Environmental laws also may impose
restrictions on the manner in which property may be used or business may be
operated, and these restrictions may require expenditures. In connection with
its current or prior ownership or operation of hotels, the Company may be
potentially liable for any such costs or liabilities. Although the Company is
currently not aware of any material environmental claims pending or threatened
against it, no assurance can be given that a material environmental claim will
not be asserted against the Company.
 
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
 
  Following the Restructuring Transactions and the other transactions
comprising the REIT Conversion, the Operating Partnership will assume all
liability arising under legal proceedings filed against Host and will
indemnify Host REIT as to all such matters. Host and the other defendants
believe all of the lawsuits in which Host is a defendant, including the
following lawsuits, are without merit and the defendants intend to defend
vigorously against such claims. However, no assurance can be given as to the
outcome of any of the lawsuits.
 
  Texas Multi-Partnership Lawsuit. On March 16, 1998, limited partners in
several limited partnerships sponsored by Host filed a lawsuit, Robert M.
Haas, Sr. and Irwin Randolph Joint Tenants, et al. v. Marriott International,
Inc., et al., Case No. 98-CI-04092, in the 57th Judicial District Court of
Bexar County, Texas, alleging that the defendants conspired to sell hotels to
the partnerships for inflated prices and that they charged the partnerships
excessive management fees to operate the partnerships' hotels. The plaintiffs
further allege that the defendants committed fraud, breached fiduciary duties
and violated the provisions of various contracts. The plaintiffs are seeking
unspecified damages. Although the partnerships have not been named as
defendants, their
 
                                      90

<PAGE>
 
partnership agreements include provisions which require the partnerships to
indemnify the general partners against losses, expenses and fees. The
defendants filed answers and defenses to the petition.
 
  Limited Service Transaction. On February 11, 1998, a group of four
individuals, all of whom are limited partners in partnerships sponsored by
Host, filed a putative class action lawsuit, Ruben, et al. v. Host Marriott
Corporation, et al., Civil Action No. 16186, in Delaware State Chancery Court,
alleging that the proposed merger of the partnerships (the "Consolidation")
into an UPREIT structure constitutes a breach of the fiduciary duties owed to
the limited partners of the partnerships by Host and the general partners of
the partnerships. In addition, the plaintiffs allege that the Consolidation
breaches various agreements relating to the partnerships. The plaintiffs are
seeking, among other things, certification of a class, injunctive relief to
prohibit the consummation of the Consolidation or, in the alternative,
rescission of the merger and damages. Although the partnerships have not been
named as defendants, their partnership agreements include provisions which
require the partnerships to indemnify the general partners against losses,
expenses and fees. The defendants have filed a motion to dismiss.
 
  Atlanta Marquis. Certain limited partners of Atlanta Marriott Marquis
Limited Partnership ("AMMLP"), filed a putative class action lawsuit, Hiram
and Ruth Sturm v. Marriott Marquis Corporation, et al., Case No. 97-CV-3706,
in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia, on December
12, 1997 against AMMLP's general partner, its directors and Host, regarding
the merger of AMMLP into a new partnership (the "AMMLP Merger") as part of a
refinancing of the partnership's debt. The plaintiffs allege that the
defendants misled the limited partners in order to induce them to approve the
AMMLP Merger, violated securities regulations and federal roll-up regulations
and breached their fiduciary duties to the partners. The plaintiffs sought to
enjoin, or in the alternative, rescind, the AMMLP Merger and damages. The
partnership agreement includes provisions which require the partnership to
indemnify the general partners against losses, expenses and fees. The
defendants have filed a motion to dismiss.
 
  Another limited partner of AMMLP sought similar relief and filed a separate
lawsuit, styled Poorvu v. Marriott Marquis Corporation, et al., Civil Action
No. 16095-NC, on December 19, 1997, in Delaware State Chancery Court. The
defendants have filed an answer to the complaint.
 
  Courtyard II. A group of partners in Courtyard by Marriott II Limited
Partnership ("CBM II") filed a lawsuit, Whitey Ford, et al. v. Host Marriott
Corporation, et al., Case No. 96-CI-08327, on June 7, 1996, in the 285th
Judicial District Court of Bexar County, Texas, against Host, Marriott
International and others alleging breach of fiduciary duty, breach of
contract, fraud, negligent misrepresentation, tortious interference, violation
of the Texas Free Enterprise and Antitrust Act of 1983 and conspiracy in
connection with the formation, operation and management of CBM II and its
hotels. The plaintiffs are seeking unspecified damages. On January 29, 1998,
two other limited partners filed a petition in intervention seeking to convert
the lawsuit into a class action. The defendants have filed an answer, the
class has been certified, class counsel has been appointed and discovery is
underway. Trial is presently scheduled for May 1999.
 
  MHP2. Two groups of limited partners of Marriott Hotel Properties II Limited
Partnership ("MHP2"), are each asserting putative class claims in lawsuits,
filed in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida
on April 24, 1996, Leonard Rosenblum, as Trustee of the Sylvia Bernice
Rosenblum Trust, et al. v. Marriott MHP Two Corporation, et al., Case No. 96-
8377-CIV-HURLEY, and, on December 18, 1997, Mackenzie Patterson Special Fund
2, L.P. et al. v. Marriott MHP Two Corporation, et al., Case No. 97-8989-CIV-
HURLEY respectively, against Host and certain of its affiliates alleging that
the defendants violated their fiduciary duties and engaged in fraud and
coercion in connection with a tender offer for MHP2 units. The District Court
dismissed the Mackenzie Patterson case on August 4, 1998 and remanded the
Rosenblum case to Palm Beach County Circuit Court on July 25, 1998. The
defendants have moved to dismiss Rosenblum's fifth amended complaint in the
case now styled Leonard Rosenblum, as Trustee of the Sylvia Bernice Rosenblum
Trust, et al. v. Marriott MHP Two Corporation, et al., Case No. CL-96-4087-AD,
or, in the alternative, to deny class certification.
 
 
                                      91

<PAGE>
 
  PHLP. On July 15, 1998, one limited partner in PHLP filed a class action
lawsuit styled Michael C. deBerardinis v. Host Marriott Corporation, Civil
Action No. WMN 98-2263, in the United States District Court for the District
of Maryland. The plaintiff alleges that Host misled the limited partners in
order to induce them into approving the sale of one of the Partnership's
hotels, violated the securities regulations by issuing a false and misleading
consent solicitation and breached fiduciary duties and the partnership
agreement. The complaint seeks unspecified damages. Host intends to vigorously
defend against the claims asserted in the lawsuit.
 
THE LEASES
 
  Due to current federal income tax law restrictions on a REIT's ability to
derive revenues directly from the operation of a hotel, Host recognized that
it would be necessary to lease its hotels to one or more lessees just as other
hotel REITs have done. Host desired to have a single lessee (or multiple
lessees controlled by a single person) in order to achieve substantial
uniformity in its lease terms and avoid protracted negotiations with multiple
parties over the terms of the lease arrangements, all of which would have been
more complicated as a result of the existing long-term management agreements
with Marriott International. Host also did not seriously attempt to
restructure the existing Marriott International management agreements as
leases (and Marriott International has not offered to do so in any of the
negotiations with Host to date) because Host understands that Marriott
International's general policy is to manage rather than lease hotels and Host
also believed that Marriott International was unlikely to be an acceptable
lessee of hotels operating under other brand names. Primarily for these
reasons, and in order to give the economic benefit of the lessee's interest in
the leases to Host's stockholders at the time of the REIT Conversion, Host
decided to enter into leases with Crestline and its subsidiaries and
distribute the stock of Crestline to Host's stockholders. Host believed that
Crestline was a more appropriate lessee than a newly formed company because
Crestline already had an independent business and substantial assets and net
worth and, thus, could perform well as a separate publicly traded company.
While Host recognized that, as with other REITs that own hotels, there would
be additional administrative and operating complexities that would result form
leasing its hotels to another party with separate interests and economic
objectives, Host believed that the advantages of the REIT Conversion
substantially outweighed these disadvantages.
 
  The following summary of the principal terms of the Leases is qualified in
its entirety by reference to the Leases, a form of which has been filed as an
exhibit to the Registration Statement of which this Proxy Statement/Prospectus
is a part.
 
  Lessees. There generally will be a separate Lessee, which will be an
indirect subsidiary of Crestline, for each Hotel or group of Hotels that is
owned by a separate subsidiary of Host REIT. Each Lessee will be a Delaware
limited liability company, whose purpose will be limited to acting as lessee
under the applicable Lease(s).
 
  Marriott International or a subsidiary will have a noneconomic membership
interest in the Lessee entitling it to certain voting rights but no economic
rights. The operating agreements for such Lessees will provide that the
Crestline member of the Lessee will have full control over the management of
the business of the Lessee, except with respect to certain decisions for which
the consent of both members will be required. These decisions are (i)
dissolving, liquidating, consolidating, merging, selling or leasing all or
substantially all of the assets of the Lessee; (ii) engaging in any other
business or acquiring any assets or incurring any liabilities not reasonably
related to the conduct of the Lessee's business; or (iii) instituting
voluntary bankruptcy or similar proceedings or consenting to involuntary
bankruptcy or similar proceedings. Upon any termination of the applicable
Management Agreement, these special voting rights of Marriott International
(or its subsidiary) will cease.
 
  Full-Service Lease Terms.  Each full-service Hotel Lease will have a fixed
term ranging from seven to ten years (depending upon the Lease), subject to
earlier termination upon the occurrence of certain contingencies described in
the Leases (including, particularly, the provisions described herein under "--
Damage or Destruction," "--Termination of Leases upon Disposition of Full-
Service Hotels" and "--Termination of the Leases upon Changes in Tax Laws").
 
                                      92

<PAGE>
 
  Minimum Rent; Percentage Rent; Additional Charges. Each Lease will require
the Lessee to pay (i) Minimum Rent (as defined below) in a fixed dollar amount
per annum plus (ii) to the extent it exceeds Minimum Rent, Percentage Rent
based upon specified percentages of aggregate sales from the applicable Hotel,
including room sales, food and beverage sales and other income ("Gross
Revenues"), in excess of specified thresholds.
 
  "Minimum Rent" will be a fixed dollar amount specified in each Lease less
the FF&E Adjustment (which is described under "Personal Property Limitation"
below). Any amounts other than Minimum Rent and Percentage Rent due to the
Host REIT Lessor under the Hotel Leases are deemed to be "Additional Charges."
 
  The amount of Minimum Rent and the Percentage Rent thresholds will be
adjusted each year (the "Annual Adjustment"). The Annual Adjustment with
respect to Minimum Rent shall equal a percentage of any increase in the
Consumer Price Index ("CPI") during the previous twelve months. The Annual
Adjustment with respect to Percentage Rent thresholds shall be a specified
percentage equal to the weighted average of a percentage of any increase in
the CPI plus a specified percentage of any increase in a regional labor cost
index agreed upon by the Lessor and the Lessee during the previous 12 months.
Neither Minimum Rent nor Percentage Rent thresholds will be decreased because
of the Annual Adjustment.
 
  Rental payments will be made on a Fiscal Year basis. The "Fiscal Year" shall
mean the fiscal year used by the hotel Manager. Payments of Rent (defined
herein) will be made within two business days after the required payment date
under the Management Agreement for each Accounting Period. "Accounting Period"
shall mean the four week accounting periods, which are used in the hotel
Manager's accounting system. Rent payable for each Accounting Period will be
the sum of (i) to the extent it would exceed Minimum Rent year-to-date,
Minimum Rent, plus (ii) to the extent it would exceed Minimum Rent and
Percentage Rent paid year-to-date, Percentage Rent, plus (iii) any Additional
Charges due ("Rent"). A final adjustment of the Percentage Rent for each
fiscal year will be made after financial statements are available. Rent
payable on any payment date will never be less than zero, other than at the
time of the final adjustment of the Percentage Rent for any Fiscal Year.
 
  The full-service Hotel Leases will generally provide for Rent adjustment in
the event of damage, destruction, partial taking, certain capital
expenditures, or an FF&E Adjustment.
 
  Lessee Expenses. Each Lessee will be responsible for paying all of the
expenses of operating the applicable Hotel(s), including all personnel costs,
utility costs and general repair and maintenance of the Hotel(s). The Lessee
also will be responsible for all fees payable to the applicable Manager,
including base and incentive management fees, chain services payments and
franchise or system fees, with respect to periods covered by the term of the
Lease. The Lessee will not be obligated to bear the cost of any capital
improvements or capital repairs to the Hotels or the other expenses borne by
the Host REIT Lessor, as described below.
 
  Host REIT Lessor Expenses. The Host REIT Lessor will be responsible for the
following expenses: real estate taxes, personal property taxes (to the extent
the Host REIT Lessor owns the personal property), casualty insurance on the
structures, ground lease rent payments, required expenditures for FF&E
(including maintaining the FF&E reserve, to the extent such is required by the
applicable Manager) and capital expenditures.
 
  The consent of the Host REIT Lessor will be required for any capital
expenditures (except in an emergency or where the owner's consent is not
required under the Management Agreement) or a change in the amount of the FF&E
Reserve payment.
 
  Crestline Guarantee. Crestline and certain of its subsidiaries will enter
into a limited guarantee of the Lease and Management Agreement obligations of
each Lessee. For each of four identified "pools" of Hotels, the cumulative
limit of the guarantee at any time will be 10% of the aggregate rents under
all full-service Hotel Leases in such pool paid with respect to the preceding
twelve full calendar months (with an annualized amount based upon the Minimum
Rent for those full-service Hotel Leases that have not been in effect for
twelve full calendar months).
 
                                      93

<PAGE>
 
  Security. The obligations of the Lessee will be secured by a pledge of all
personal property (tangible and intangible) of the Lessee related to or used
in connection with the operation of the Hotels (including any cash and
receivables from the Manager or others held by the Lessee as part of "working
capital").
 
  Working Capital. Each Host REIT Lessor will sell the existing working
capital (including Inventory and Fixed Asset Supplies (as defined in the
Uniform System of Accounts for Hotels) and net receivables due from the
Manager, net of accounts payable and accrued expenses) to the applicable
Lessee upon the commencement of the Lease at a price equal to the fair market
value of such assets. The purchase price will be represented by a note
evidencing a loan that bears interest at a rate per annum equal to the "long-
term applicable federal rate" in effect on the commencement of the Lease.
Interest owed on the working capital loan will be due simultaneously with each
periodic Rent payment and the amount of each payment of interest will be
credited against such Rent payment. The principal amount of the working
capital loan will be payable upon termination of the Lease. At the termination
or expiration of the Lease, the Lessee will sell to the Host REIT Lessor the
then existing working capital at a price equal to the value of such assets at
that time. The Host REIT Lessor will pay the purchase price of the working
capital by offsetting against the outstanding principal balance of the working
capital loan. To the extent that the value of the working capital delivered to
the Host REIT Lessor exceeds the value of the working capital delivered by the
Host REIT Lessor to the Lessee at the commencement of the Lease, the Host REIT
Lessor shall pay to the Lessee an amount equal to the difference in cash. To
the extent that the value of the working capital delivered to the Host REIT
Lessor is less than the value of the working capital delivered by the Host
REIT Lessor to the Lessee at the commencement of the Lease, the Lessee shall
pay to the Host REIT Lessor an amount equal to the difference in cash.
 
  Termination of Leases upon Disposition of Full-Service Hotels. In the event
the applicable Host REIT Lessor enters into an agreement to sell or otherwise
transfer any full-service Hotel free and clear of the applicable Lease, the
Host REIT Lessor must pay the Lessee a termination fee equal to the fair
market value of the Lessee's leasehold interest in the remaining term of the
Lease. For purposes of determining the fair market value, a discount rate of
12% will be assumed, and the annual income for each remaining year of the
Lease will be assumed to be the average annual income generated by the Lessee
during the three fiscal years preceding the termination date or if the Hotel
has not been in operation for at least three fiscal years, then the average
during the preceding fiscal years that have elapsed, and if the Hotel has not
been in operation for at least twelve months, then the assumed annual income
shall be determined on a pro forma basis. Alternatively, the Host REIT Lessor
will be entitled to (i) substitute a comparable Hotel or Hotels (in terms of
economics and quality for the Host REIT Lessor and the Lessee as agreed to by
the Lessee) for any Hotel that is sold or (ii) sell the Hotel subject to the
Lease (subject to the Lessee's reasonable approval if the sale is to an entity
that does not have sufficient financial resources and liquidity to fulfill the
"owner's" obligations under the Management Agreement and the Host REIT
Lessor's obligations under the lease, or controls or is controlled by a person
convicted of a felony involving moral turpitude), without being required to
pay a termination fee. Pursuant to a separate pooling agreement, the Host REIT
Lessor and the Lessee will each have the right to terminate up to twelve
Leases without being required to pay any fee or other compensation as a result
of such termination, but the Host REIT Lessor only will be permitted to
exercise such right in connection with a sale of a Hotel to an unrelated third
party or the transfer of a Hotel to a joint venture in which the Operating
Partnership does not have a two-thirds or greater interest.
 
  Termination of the Hotel Leases upon Changes in Tax Laws. In the event that
changes in the federal income tax laws allow the Host REIT Lessors, or
subsidiaries or affiliates of the Host REIT Lessors, to directly operate the
Hotels without jeopardizing Host REIT's status as a REIT, the Host REIT
Lessors will have the right to terminate all, but not less than all, of the
full-service Hotel Leases, in return for paying the Lessee the fair market
value of the remaining terms of the full-service Hotel Leases, valued in the
same manner as provided above under "Termination of the Hotel Leases upon
Disposition of the Full-Service Hotels." The payment will be payable in cash
or, subject to certain conditions, shares of Host REIT Common Stock, at the
election of Host REIT.
 
  Damage or Destruction. If a Hotel is partially or totally destroyed and is
no longer suitable for use as a hotel (as reasonably determined by the Host
REIT Lessor), the Lease of such Hotel shall automatically terminate
 
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and the insurance proceeds shall be retained by the Host REIT Lessor, except
to the extent of any personal property owned by the Lessee. In this event, no
termination fee shall be owed to the Lessee. If a Hotel is partially destroyed
but is still suitable for use as a hotel (as reasonably determined by the Host
REIT Lessor), the Lessee, subject to the Host REIT Lessor agreeing to release
the insurance proceeds to fund any shortfall in the insurance proceeds, shall
apply the insurance proceeds to restore the Hotel to its preexisting
condition. The Host REIT Lessor shall fund any shortfall in insurance proceeds
less than or equal to 5% of the estimated cost of repair. The Host REIT Lessor
shall fund, in its sole discretion, any shortfall in insurance proceeds
greater than 5% of the estimated cost of the repair, provided that if the Host
REIT Lessor elects not to fund such shortfall the Lessee may terminate the
Lease and the Host REIT Lessor shall pay to the Lessee a termination fee equal
to the Lessee's operating profit for the immediately preceding fiscal year. If
and to the extent any damage or destruction results in a reduction of Gross
Revenues which would otherwise be realizable from the operation of the Hotel,
the applicable Host REIT Lessor shall receive all loss of income insurance and
the Lessee shall have no obligation to pay rent in excess of the Percentage
Rent realizable from Gross Revenues generated by the Hotel during the period
of destruction.
 
  Events of Default. Subject to the notice and some cure periods in the Hotel
Lease, the Hotel Lease may be terminated without penalty by the applicable
Host REIT Lessor if any of the following Events of Default occur:
 
  .  Failure to pay Rent within ten days after the due date;
 
  .  Failure to comply with or observe any of the terms of the Hotel Lease
     (other than failure to pay Rent) for 30 days after notice from the Host
     REIT Lessor, including failure to properly maintain the Hotel (other
     than by reason of the failure of the Host REIT Lessor to perform its
     obligations under the Hotel Lease), such period to be extended for up to
     an additional 90 days if such default cannot be cured with due diligence
     within 30 days;
 
  .  Failure of Crestline to maintain minimum net worth or debt service
     coverage ratio requirements;
 
  .  Filing of any petition for relief, bankruptcy or liquidation by the
     Lessee or any parent company of the Lessee;
 
  .  The Lessee voluntarily ceases to operate the Hotel for 30 consecutive
     days, except as a result of a casualty, condemnation or emergency
     situation; or
 
  .  A change in control of Crestline, the Lessee or OpCo, a subsidiary of
     Crestline and the parent of the Lessees. Unless the change in control
     involves an "adverse party," which would include a competitor in the
     hotel business, a party without adequate financial resources, a party
     that has been convicted of a felony, or a party who would jeopardize
     Host REIT's qualification as a REIT, Host REIT Lessor must pay a
     termination fee equal to the Lessee's operating profit from the Hotel
     for the immediately preceding fiscal year.
 
  In addition to all other remedies available to the Host REIT Lessor, in the
event Crestline fails to maintain a certain minimum net worth or debt service
coverage ratio required, the Host REIT Lessor shall have the right to require
that all revenues payable by the Manager to the Lessee be paid into a
controlled account and that all Rent due to the Host REIT Lessor be paid
therefrom before any cash is paid over to Crestline.
 
  Assignment of Lease. A Lessee will be permitted to sublet all or part of the
Hotel or assign its interest under its Hotel Lease, without the consent of the
Host REIT Lessor, to any wholly-owned and controlled subsidiary of Crestline,
provided that Crestline continues to meet the minimum net worth test and all
other requirements of the Lease. Transfers to other parties will be permitted
if approved by the Host REIT Lessor.
 
  Subordination to Qualifying Mortgage Debt. The rights of each Lessee will be
expressly subordinate to qualifying mortgage debt and any refinancing thereof.
A default under the loan documents may result in the termination of the Hotel
Lease by the lender. The lender will not be required to provide a non-
disturbance agreement to the Lessee.
 
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  The Host REIT Lessor will be obligated to compensate the Lessee, on a basis
equal to the lease termination provision described in "--Termination of the
Hotel Leases upon Disposition of Full-Service Hotels" above, if the full-
service Hotel Lease is terminated because of a non-monetary default under the
terms of a loan that occurs because of an action or omission by the Host REIT
Lessor (or its affiliates) or a monetary default where there is not an uncured
monetary Event of Default of the Lessee. In addition, if any loan is not
refinanced in a timely manner, and the loan amortization schedule is converted
to a cash flow sweep structure, the Lessee has the right to terminate the
Lease after a twelve-month cure period and the Lessor will owe a termination
fee as provided above. During any period of time that a cash flow sweep
structure is in effect, the Host REIT Lessor will compensate the Lessee for
any lost revenue resulting from such cash flow sweep.
 
  Indemnification. Each Lessee will indemnify the applicable Host REIT Lessor
for any loss suffered by the Host REIT Lessor as a result of certain of the
Lessee's actions or inactions in operating the Hotels, including accident or
injury to any person on the Hotel properties or misuse of the Hotel properties
by the Lessee (including actions of the Manager and its employees, except in
connection with capital expenditures and certain other retained obligations).
Each Lessee will be required to maintain liability insurance as provided by
the applicable Management Agreement.
 
  Each Lessee will indemnify the applicable Host REIT Lessor for any liability
resulting from environmental matters caused by the Lessee's negligence or
willful misconduct.
 
  Personal Property Limitation. If a Host REIT Lessor reasonably anticipates
that the average tax basis of the items of the Host REIT Lessor's FF&E and
other personal property that are leased to the applicable Lessee will exceed
15% of the aggregate average tax basis of the real and personal property
subject to the applicable Lease, the following procedures will apply, subject
to obtaining lender consent where required:
 
  .  The Host REIT Lessor will acquire any replacement FF&E that would cause
     the applicable limits to be exceeded (the "Excess FF&E"), and
     immediately thereafter the Lessee would be obligated either to acquire
     such Excess FF&E from the Host REIT Lessor or to cause a third party to
     purchase such FF&E.
 
  .  The Lessee would agree to give a right of first opportunity to a Non-
     Controlled Subsidiary to acquire the Excess FF&E and to lease the
     Excess FF&E to the Lessee at an annual rental equal to the Market
     Leasing Factor (as defined below) times the cost of the Excess FF&E. If
     such Non-Controlled Subsidiary does not agree to acquire the Excess
     FF&E and to such lease, then the Lessee may either acquire the Excess
     FF&E itself or arrange for another third party to acquire such Excess
     FF&E and to lease the same to Lessee.
 
  .  The annual Rent under the applicable Hotel Lease would be reduced by an
     amount equal to the mathematical product of (A) the Market Leasing
     Factor for personal property with an average expected useful life
     corresponding to the expected useful life for the Excess FF&E times (B)
     the cost of the Excess FF&E times (C) (x) 100% if the Lessee leases
     such Excess FF&E from a Non-Controlled Subsidiary or (y) 110% if the
     Lessee purchases such Excess FF&E or leases such Excess FF&E from a
     third party other than a Non-Controlled Subsidiary.
 
  The Market Leasing Factor for the first two years under a Lease will be set
forth on a schedule to the Lease. For each year thereafter, the Market Leasing
Factor will be based upon the median of the leasing rates of at least three
nationally recognized companies engaged in the business of leasing similar
personal property.
 
  Certain Actions under the Hotel Leases. The Leases prohibit the Lessee from
taking the following actions with respect to the Management Agreement without
notice to the Host REIT Lessor and, if the action would have a material
adverse effect on the Host REIT Lessor, the consent of the Host REIT Lessor:
(i) terminate the Management Agreement prior to the expiration of the term
thereof; (ii) amend, modify or assign the Management Agreement; (iii) waive
(or fail to enforce) any right of the "owner" under the Management Agreement;
(iv) waive any breach or default by the Manager under the Management Agreement
(or fail to enforce any right of
 
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the "owner" in connection therewith); (v) agree to any change in the Manager
or consent to any assignment by the Manager; or (vi) take any other action
which reasonably would be expected to materially adversely affect the Host
REIT Lessor's rights or obligations under the Management Agreement for periods
following the termination of the Hotel Lease (whether upon the expiration of
its term or upon earlier termination as provided for therein).
 
  Change in Manager. A Lessee will be permitted to change the Manager or the
brand affiliation of a Hotel only with the approval of the applicable Host
REIT Lessor, which approval may be withheld in the Host REIT Lessor's sole
discretion; provided, that the replacement manager is a nationally recognized
manager with substantial experience in managing hotels of comparable quality.
No such replacement can extend beyond the term of the Lease without the
consent of the Host REIT Lessor, which consent may be withheld in the Host
REIT Lessor's sole discretion.
 
THE MANAGEMENT AGREEMENTS
 
  General. The Lessees will lease the Hotels from the Partnerships and the
Private Partnerships under the Management Agreements between the Operating
Partnership and the subsidiaries of Marriott International and other companies
that currently manage the Hotels. Following the REIT Conversion, as a result
of their assumptions of obligations under the Management Agreements, the
Lessees will have substantially all of the rights and obligations of the
"Owners" of the Hotels under the Management Agreements for the period during
which the Leases are in effect (including the obligation to pay the management
and other certain fees thereunder) and will hold the Company harmless with
respect thereto. See "--Management Services Provided by Marriott International
and Affiliates--Assignment of Management Agreements."
 
  Relationship with Marriott International. Subsidiaries of Marriott
International will serve as Managers for a substantial majority of the
Company's Hotels which will be leased to the Lessees, pursuant to the
Management Agreements. Marriott International and its subsidiaries also
provide various other services to Host REIT and its affiliates and to
Crestline and its affiliates. With respect to these contractual arrangements,
the potential exists for disagreement as to contract compliance. Additionally,
the possible desire of the Company to finance, refinance or effect a sale of
any of the Hotels leased to the Lessees and managed by subsidiaries of
Marriott International may, depending upon the structure of such transactions,
result in a need to modify the Management Agreements with respect to such
Hotel. Any such modification proposed by the Company may not be acceptable to
Marriott International or the applicable Lessee, and the lack of consent from
either Marriott International or the applicable Lessee that has assumed the
Management Agreement could adversely affect the Company's ability to
consummate such financing or sale. In addition, certain situations could arise
where actions taken by Marriott International in its capacity as manager of
competing lodging properties would not necessarily be in the best interests of
the Company or the Lessees. Nevertheless, the Company believes that there is
sufficient mutuality of interest between the Company, the Lessees and Marriott
International to result in a mutually productive relationship.
 
 Management Services Provided by Marriott International and Affiliates.
 
  General. Under each Management Agreement related to a Marriott
International-managed Hotel, the Manager will provide complete management
services to the applicable Lessees in connection with its management of such
Lessee's Hotels following the REIT Conversion. Except where specifically
noted, these relationships are substantially identical to those that exist
between the applicable Manager and Host or the applicable Partnership or
Private Partnership currently, and that would exist between the Company's
subsidiaries and the Manager in the event the Leases expire or otherwise
terminate while the Management Agreements remain in effect. The services
provided by each Manager to each Lessee will include the following:
 
  Assignment of Management Agreements. The Management Agreement applicable to
each Hotel will be assigned to the applicable Lessee for the term of the Lease
of such Hotel. The Lessee will be obligated to perform all of the obligations
of the Lessor under the Management Agreement during the term of its Lease,
other than certain retained obligations, including, without limitation,
payment of property taxes, property casualty insurance
 
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and ground rent, and maintaining a reserve fund for FF&E replacements and
capital expenditures, for which the Lessor will retain responsibility.
Although the Lessee will assume obligations of the Lessor under the Management
Agreement, the Lessor will not be released from its obligations and, if the
Lessee fails to perform any obligations, the Manager will be entitled to seek
performance by or damages from the Lessor. If the Lease is terminated for any
reason, any new or successor Lessee must meet certain requirement for an
"Approved Lessee" or otherwise be acceptable to Marriott International. The
requirement for an "Approved Lessee" includes that the entity (i) has
sufficient financial resources and liquidity to fill the obligations under the
Management Agreement, (ii) is not in control of or controlled by persons who
have been convicted of felonies, (iii) is not engaged, or affiliated with any
person or entity engaged in the business of operating a branded hotel chain
having 5,000 or more guest rooms in competition with Marriott International,
and (iv) must be a single purpose entity in which Marriott International has a
noneconomic membership interest with the same rights as it has in Lessee. Any
new lease must be in substantially the same form as the Lease or otherwise be
acceptable to Marriott International.
 
  Operational Services. The Managers will have sole responsibility and
exclusive authority for all activities necessary for the day-to-day operation
of the Hotels, including establishment of all room rates, the processing of
reservations, procurement of inventories, supplies and services, periodic
inspection and consultation visits to the Hotels by the Managers' technical
and operational experts and promotion and publicity of the Hotels. The Manager
will receive compensation from the Lessee in the form of a base management fee
and an incentive management fee, which are normally calculated as percentages
of gross revenues and operating profits, respectively.
 
  Executive Supervision and Management Services. The Managers will provide all
managerial and other employees for the Hotels; review the operation and
maintenance of the Hotels; prepare reports, budgets and projections; provide
other administrative and accounting support services, such as planning and
policy services, financial planning, divisional financial services, risk
planning services, product planning and development, employee planning,
corporate executive management, legislative and governmental representation
and certain in-house legal services; and protect the "Marriott" trademark and
other tradenames and service marks. The Manager also will provide a national
reservations system.
 
  Chain Services. The Management Agreements will require the Manager to
furnish certain services (the "Chain Services") that are furnished generally
on a central or regional basis to hotels in the Marriott hotel system. Such
services will include the following: (i) the development and operation of
computer systems and reservation services, (ii) regional management and
administrative services, regional marketing and sales services, regional
training services, manpower development and relocation costs of regional
personnel and (iii) such additional central or regional services as may from
time to time be more efficiently performed on a regional or group level. Costs
and expenses incurred in providing such services are allocated among all
hotels in the Marriott hotel system managed by the Manager or its affiliates
and each applicable Lessee will be required to reimburse the Manager for its
allocable share of such costs and expenses.
 
  Working Capital and Fixed Asset Supplies. The Lessee will be required to
maintain working capital for each Hotel and fund the cost of fixed asset
supplies, which principally consist of linen and similar items. The applicable
Lessee will also be responsible for providing funds to meet the cash needs for
the operations of the Hotels if at any time the funds available from
operations are insufficient to meet the financial requirements of the Hotels.
 
  Use of Affiliates. The Manager employs the services of its affiliates to
provide certain services under the Management Agreements. Certain of the
Management Agreements provide that the terms of any such employment must be no
less favorable to the applicable Lessee, in the reasonable judgment of the
Manager, than those that would be available from the Manager.
 
  FF&E Replacements. The Management Agreements generally provide that once
each year the Manager will prepare a list of FF&E to be acquired and certain
routine repairs that are normally capitalized to be
 
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performed in the next year ("FF&E Replacements") and an estimate of the funds
necessary therefor. Under the terms of the Leases, the Company, as lessor, is
required to provide to the applicable Lessee, all necessary FF&E for the
operation of the Hotels (including funding any required FF&E Replacements).
For purposes of funding the FF&E Replacements, a specified percentage
(generally 5%) of the gross revenues of the Hotel will be deposited by the
Manager into a book entry account (the "FF&E Reserve Account"). These amounts
will be treated under the Leases as paid by the Lessees to the Company and
will be credited against their rental payments. If the Manager determines that
more than 5% of the gross revenues of the Hotel will be required to fund
repairs for a certain period, the Manager may increase the percentage of gross
revenues to be deposited into the FF&E Reserve Account for such periods. In
such event, the Company may elect to fund such increases through annual
increases in the amount deposited by the Manager in the FF&E Reserve Account
or to make a lump-sum contribution to the FF&E Reserve Account of the
additional amounts required. If the Company adopts the first election, the
increased amounts withheld by Managers and deposited in the FF&E Reserve
Account will be credited against the rental obligations of the Lessee. If the
Company fails to elect either option within thirty days of the request for
additional funds or fails to pay the lump-sum within 60 days of its election
to do so, the Manager may terminate the Management Agreement. Under certain
circumstances, the Manager may make repairs in addition to those set forth on
its list, but in no event may it expend more than the amount in the FF&E
Reserve Account without the consent of the Company and the Lessee.
 
  Under certain of the Management Agreements, the Company must approve the
FF&E Replacements, including any FF&E Replacements proposed by the Manager
that are not contained on the annual list which was approved by the Company
and the Lessee. If the Manager and the Company agree, the Company will acquire
or otherwise provide the FF&E Replacements set forth on the approved list. If
the Company and the Manager are unable to agree on the list within 60 days of
its submission, the Company will be required to make only those FF&E
Replacements specified on such list that are no more extensive than the system
standards for FF&E Replacements that the Manager requires for Marriott hotels.
For purposes of funding the FF&E Replacements required to be paid for by the
Company, each Management Agreement and the Company's loan agreements require
the Company to deposit a designated amount into the FF&E Reserve Account
periodically. The Lessees will have no obligation to fund the FF&E Reserve
Accounts (and any amounts deposited therein by the Manager from funds
otherwise due the Lessee under the Management Agreement will be credited
against the Lessee's rental obligation).
 
  Under each Lease, the Company will be responsible for the costs of FF&E
Replacements and for decisions with respect thereto (subject to its
obligations to the Lessee under the Lease).
 
  Building Alterations, Improvements and Renewals. The Management Agreements
require the Manager to prepare an annual estimate of the expenditures
necessary for major repairs, alterations, improvements, renewals and
replacements to the structural, mechanical, electrical, heating, ventilating,
air conditioning, plumbing and vertical transportation elements of each Hotel.
Such estimate will be submitted to the Company and the Lessee for their
approval. In addition to the foregoing, the Management Agreements generally
provide that the Manager may propose such changes, alterations and
improvements to the Hotel as are required, in the Manager's reasonable
judgment, to keep the Hotel in a competitive, efficient and economical
operating condition or in accordance with Marriott standards. The cost of the
foregoing shall be paid from the FF&E Reserve Account; to the extent that
there are insufficient funds in such account, the Company is required to pay
any shortfall. Under the Management Agreements (and the Leases), neither the
Company nor the Lessee may unreasonably withhold consent to repairs and other
changes which are required under applicable law or any of the Manager's "life-
safety" standards and, if the Company and the Lessee fail to approve any of
the other proposed repairs or other changes within 60 days of the request
therefor, the Manager may terminate the Management Agreement. Under certain
other of the Management Agreements, if the Company and the Manager are unable
to agree on the estimate within 60 days of its submission, the Company will be
required to make only those expenditures that are no more extensive than the
Manager requires for Marriott hotels generally, as the case may be. Under the
terms of the Leases, the Company will be responsible for the costs of the
foregoing items and for decisions with respect thereto (subject to its
obligations to the Lessees under the Leases).
 
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  Service Marks. During the term of the Management Agreements, the service
mark "Marriott" and other symbols, logos and service marks currently used by
the Manager and its affiliates may be used in the operation of the Hotels.
Marriott International (or its applicable affiliates) intends to retain its
legal ownership of these marks. Any right to use the service marks, logo and
symbols and related trademarks at a Hotel will terminate with respect to that
Hotel upon termination of the Management Agreement with respect to such Hotel.
 
  Termination Fee. Certain of the Management Agreements provide that if the
Management Agreement is terminated prior to its full term due to casualty,
condemnation or the sale of the Hotel, the Manager will receive a termination
fee as specified in the specific Management Agreement. Under the Leases, the
responsibility for the payment of any such termination fee as between the
Lessee and the Company will depend upon the cause for such termination.
 
  Termination for Failure to Perform. Substantially all of the Management
Agreements may be terminated based upon a failure to meet certain financial
performance criteria, subject to the Manager's right to prevent such
termination by making certain payments to the Lessee based upon the shortfall
in such criteria.
 
  Events of Default. Events of default under the Management Agreements
include, among others, the following: (i) the failure of either party to make
payments pursuant to the Management Agreement within ten days after written
notice of such non-payment has been made, (ii) the failure of either party to
perform, keep or fulfill any of the covenants, undertakings, obligations or
conditions set forth in the Management Agreement and the continuance of such
default for a period of 30 days after notice of said failure or, if such
default is not susceptible of being cured within 30 days, the failure to
commence said cure within 30 days or thereafter the failure to diligently
pursue such efforts to completion, (iii) if either party files a voluntary
petition in bankruptcy or insolvency or a petition for reorganization under
any bankruptcy law or admits that it is unable to pay its debts as they become
due, (iv) if either party consents to an involuntary petition in bankruptcy or
fails to vacate, within 90 days from the date of entry thereof, any order
approving an involuntary petition by such party; or (v) if an order, judgment
or decree by any court of competent jurisdiction, on the application of a
creditor, adjudicating either party as bankrupt or insolvent or approving a
petition seeking reorganization or appointing a receiver, trustee, or
liquidator of all or a substantial part of such party's assets is entered, and
such order, judgment or decree continues unstayed and in effect for any period
of 90 days.
 
  As described above, all fees payable under the Management Agreements will
become obligations of the Lessees, to be paid by the Lessees, as modified
prior to the consummation of the REIT Conversion, for so long as the Leases
remain in effect. The Lessees' obligations to pay these fees, however, could
adversely affect the ability of one or more Lessees to pay Base Rent or
Percentage Rent payable under the Leases, even though such amounts otherwise
are due and owing to the Company. Moreover, the Operating Partnership remains
obligated to the Manager to the extent the Lessee fails to pay these fees.
 
NONCOMPETITION AGREEMENTS
 
  Crestline and Host REIT will enter into a non-competition agreement in
connection with the Initial E&P Distribution. Pursuant to this non-competition
agreement, Crestline will agree, among other things, that, as long as it is a
Lessee for more than 25% of the hotels owned by Host REIT at the time of the
Initial E&P Distribution (or until December 31, 2008, if sooner), it will not
(i) own, operate or otherwise control (as owner or franchisor) any full-
service hotel brand or franchise or purchase, finance or otherwise invest in
full-service hotels or act as an agent or consultant with respect to any of
the foregoing activities, except for acquisitions of property used in hotels
as to which Crestline is the Lessee and for investments in full-service hotels
which represent an immaterial portion of a merger or similar transaction or a
minimal portfolio investment in another entity or for activities undertaken
with respect to its business of providing asset management services to hotel
owners or (ii) without the consent of Host or Host REIT, manage any of the
hotels owned by Host or Host REIT, other than to provide asset management
services as described in "Certain Relationships and Related Transactions--
Relationship between Host REIT and Crestline Capital Corporation After the
Initial E&P Distribution--Asset Management
 
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Agreement." Host REIT will agree, among other things, that, until December 31,
2003 it will not purchase, finance or otherwise invest in senior living
communities, or act as an agent or consultant with respect to any of the
foregoing activities (except for acquisitions of communities which represent
an immaterial portion of a merger or similar transaction or for minimal
portfolio investments in other entities). In addition, both Crestline and Host
REIT will agree not to hire or attempt to hire any of the other company's
senior employees at any time prior to December 31, 2000.
 
INDEBTEDNESS
 
  Bond Refinancing. On August 5, 1998, HMH Properties, Inc. ("HMH
Properties"), a subsidiary of Host that will merge into the Operating
Partnership prior to the Effective Date, issued $1.7 billion of 7 7/8% senior
notes issued in two series, consisting of $500 million due 2005 and $1.2
billion due 2008 (the "New Senior Notes"). The New Senior Notes are guaranteed
by Host, Host Marriott Hospitality, Inc. and certain subsidiaries of HMH
Properties and are secured by pledges of equity interests in certain
subsidiaries of HMH Properties. The Operating Partnership will assume the New
Senior Notes in connection with the REIT Conversion and the guarantee by Host
Marriott is expected to terminate on the Effective Date.
 
  The indenture under which the New Senior Notes were issued contains
covenants restricting the ability of HMH Properties and certain of its
subsidiaries to incur indebtedness, acquire or sell assets or make investments
in other entities, and make distributions to equityholders of HMH Properties
and (following the REIT Conversion) the Operating Partnership. The New Senior
Notes also contain a financial covenant requiring the maintenance of a
specified ratio of unencumbered assets to unsecured debt.
 
  Credit Facility. On August 5, 1998, HMH Properties entered into a $1.25
billion credit facility (the "New Credit Facility") provided by a syndicate of
financial institutions (the "Lenders") led by Bankers Trust Company. The New
Credit Facility provides the Company with (i) a $350 million term loan
facility (subject to increases as provided in the succeeding paragraph) and
(ii) a $900 million revolving credit facility. The New Credit Facility will
have an initial term of three years with two one-year options to extend. The
proceeds of the New Credit Facility, along with the proceeds from the New
Senior Notes, were used to fund the purchase of $1.55 billion of senior notes
of HMH Properties at the initial closing on August 5, 1998, and repay $22
million of outstanding borrowings under a line of credit provided by the
Lenders to certain subsidiaries of Host and will be used (i) to acquire full-
service hotels and other real estate assets including, under certain
circumstances, senior living properties, (ii) under certain circumstances, to
develop new full-service hotels and (iii) for general working capital
purposes.
 
  The term loan facility was funded on the closing date of the New Credit
Facility. The $350 million term loan facility may be increased by up to $250
million after the initial closing and will be available, subject to terms and
conditions thereof and to the commitment of sufficient Lenders, in up to two
drawings to be made on or prior to the second anniversary of the closing of
the New Credit Facility. The Lenders will advance funds under the revolving
credit facility as requested by the Company with minimum borrowing amounts and
frequency limitations to be agreed upon, subject to customary conditions
including, but not limited to, (i) no existing or resulting default or event
of default under the New Credit Facility and (ii) continued accuracy of
representations and warranties in all material respects. As of September 28,
1998, approximately $350 million was outstanding under the New Credit
Facility.
 
  The interest rate applicable to the New Credit Facility and the unused
commitment fee applicable to the revolving portion of the New Credit Facility
are calculated based on a spread over LIBOR that will fluctuate based on the
quarterly recalculation of a leverage ratio set forth in the New Credit
Facility. The New Credit Facility provides that in the event that the Company
achieves one of several investment grade long-term unsecured indebtedness
ratings, the spread over LIBOR applicable to the New Credit Facility will be
fixed based on the particular rating achieved. If the Company elects to
exercise its one-year extensions, the Company will be required to amortize
approximately 22.5% per annum of the principal amount outstanding under the
New Credit Facility at the end of the initial three-year term.
 
                                      101

<PAGE>
 
  The Company's obligations under the New Credit Facility are guaranteed,
subject to certain conditions, on a senior basis by Host, Host Marriott
Hospitality, Inc. and certain of HMH Properties' existing and future
subsidiaries. The New Credit Facility will be assumed by the Operating
Partnership in connection with the REIT Conversion and the guarantee of Host
is expected to terminate on the Effective Date. In addition, certain
subsidiaries of Host other than HMH Properties and its subsidiaries may, under
certain circumstances, guarantee the obligations under the New Credit Facility
in the future. Borrowings under the New Credit Facility will rank pari passu
with the New Senior Notes and other existing and future senior indebtedness of
the Company. The New Credit Facility is secured, on an equal and ratable
basis, with the New Senior Notes by a pledge of the capital stock of certain
direct and indirect subsidiaries of HMH Properties. In addition, the New
Credit Facility may, under certain circumstances in the future, be secured by
a pledge of capital stock of certain subsidiaries of Host other than HMH
Properties and its subsidiaries.
 
  The New Credit Facility includes financial and other covenants that require
the maintenance of certain ratios with respect to, among other things, maximum
leverage, limitations on indebtedness, minimum net worth and interest and
fixed charge coverage and that restrict payment of distributions and
investments, acquisitions and sales of assets by the Company.
 
                                      102

<PAGE>
 
                        DISTRIBUTION AND OTHER POLICIES
 
  The following is a discussion of the anticipated policies with respect to
distributions, investments, financing, lending, conflicts of interest and
certain other activities of the Company. Upon consummation of the other
transactions comprising the REIT Conversion, the Company's policies with
respect to these activities will be determined by the Board of Directors of
Host REIT and may be amended or revised from time to time at the discretion of
the Board of Directors without notice to, or a vote of, the stockholders of
Host REIT, except that changes in certain policies with respect to conflicts
of interest must be consistent with legal and contractual requirements.
 
DISTRIBUTION POLICY
 
  Host REIT and the Operating Partnership intend to pay regular quarterly
distributions to holders of Host REIT Common Stock and OP Units. Host REIT and
the Operating Partnership anticipate that distributions will be paid during
January, April, July and October of each year, except that the first
distribution in 1999 is expected to be paid at the end of February if the REIT
Conversion is completed in 1998. The distributions to stockholders per share
of Host REIT Common Stock are expected to be equal to the amount distributed
by the Operating Partnership per OP Unit (although Host REIT's distributions
to stockholders could be lower to take into account any income taxes payable
by Host REIT if at the time it is not yet a REIT for federal income tax
purposes). The following discussion and the information set forth in the table
and footnotes below should be read in conjunction with the Pro Forma
Statements of Operations and notes thereto, "Summary--Forward Looking
Statements," "Risk Factors" and "Management's Discussion and Analysis of
Financial Condition and Results of Operations--Liquidity and Capital
Resources."
 
  Although the Code generally requires a REIT to distribute 95% of its taxable
income for each year (within a certain period after the end of such year), the
Operating Partnership will establish its initial distribution at a level that
will enable Host REIT to distribute to its stockholders for each year an
amount equal to 100% of its taxable income (other than capital gains, which
will be addressed on a case-by-case basis). Host REIT anticipates that
distributions generally will be paid from cash available for distribution, but
to the extent that cash available for distribution is insufficient, the
Operating Partnership intends to borrow funds in order to make distributions
to holders of OP Units to enable Host REIT to distribute 100% of its taxable
income for each year (within a certain period after the end of such year).
Based upon Host's preliminary estimates of Host REIT's taxable income for the
twelve months ending December 31, 1999, Host and the Operating Partnership
currently estimate that this policy will result in an initial annual
distribution by the Operating Partnership of approximately $0.84 per OP Unit
($0.21 per quarter) during the twelve months ending December 31, 1999.
 
  The Operating Partnership has estimated its pro forma cash available for
distribution during the twelve months ending December 31, 1999 based upon the
Operating Partnership's pro forma cash from operations and pro forma cash
available for distribution during the fifty-two weeks ended June 19, 1998 (the
"Last Twelve Months"), adjusted for certain known material events and/or
contractual commitments that either have occurred or will occur prior to
December 31, 1999. No effect was given to any changes in working capital
resulting from changes in current assets and liabilities (which changes are
not expected to be material) or to the net amount of cash estimated to be used
for (or provided by) investing activities or financing activities (other than
the net change in scheduled loan principal repayments on existing indebtedness
and net increase in deferred rental revenues). The estimate of cash available
for distribution is not intended to be a projection or forecast of the
Operating Partnership's results of operations or its liquidity. The following
table describes the calculation of pro forma cash from operations and cash
available for distribution for the Last Twelve Months and the calculation of
estimated pro forma cash available for distribution during the twelve months
ending December 31, 1999:
 
                                      103

<PAGE>
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                   (DOLLARS IN
                                                                    MILLIONS,
                                                                  EXCEPT PER OP
                                                                  UNIT AMOUNTS)
                                                                  -------------
<S>                                                               <C>
Pro forma income before extraordinary items for the fiscal year
 ended January 2, 1998...........................................     $  25
  Less: Pro forma income (loss) before extraordinary items for
   the First Two Quarters 1997...................................      (135)
  Plus: Pro forma income (loss) before extraordinary items for
      the First Two Quarters 1998................................      (127)
                                                                      -----
Pro forma income before extraordinary items for the Last Twelve
 Months..........................................................        33
  Plus: Pro forma loss on sale of real estate for the Last Twelve
      Months(1)..................................................        15
  Plus: Pro forma real estate related depreciation and
      amortization for the Last Twelve
      Months(2)..................................................       337
  Plus: Pro forma portion of FFO of unconsolidated equity
      investments for the Last Twelve Months, net of pro forma
      equity in earnings of affiliates for the Last Twelve
      Months(3)..................................................        37
  Less: Pro forma one-time gain for the Last Twelve Months(4)....       (10)
  Less: Pro forma portion of FFO relating to minority owners for
      the Last Twelve Months, net of pro forma portion of
      minority interest relating to OP Units for the Last Twelve
      Months(5)..................................................        (8)
                                                                      -----
Pro forma cash from operations during the Last Twelve Months.....       404
Adjustments:
  Pro forma FF&E reserves for the Last Twelve Months(6)..........      (179)
  Pro forma portion of FF&E reserves of unconsolidated equity
   investments for the Last Twelve Months(7).....................        (4)
  Pro forma portion of FF&E reserves of minority interests for
   the Last Twelve Months(8).....................................         5
  Pro forma principal repayments for the Last Twelve Months(9)...       (67)
                                                                      -----
Pro forma cash available for distribution during the Last Twelve
 Months..........................................................       159
Adjustments:
  Net change in principal repayments.............................         3
  Net increase in deferred rental revenues(10)...................        52
                                                                      -----
Estimated pro forma cash available for distribution during the
 twelve months ending December 31, 1999..........................     $ 214
                                                                      =====
Total estimated initial annual cash distributions during the
 twelve months ending December 31, 1999(11)......................     $ 226
                                                                      =====
Pro forma cash available for distribution per OP Unit during the
 twelve months ending December 31, 1999(12)......................     $ .80
                                                                      =====
Estimated initial annual cash distributions per OP Unit during
 the twelve months ending December 31, 1999(12)..................     $ .84
                                                                      =====
</TABLE>

- --------
 (1) Represents pro forma loss on sale of real estate for the last two
     quarters 1997 of $15 million.
 (2) Represents pro forma real estate related depreciation and amortization
     for the fiscal year ended January 2, 1998 of $339 million minus pro forma
     real estate related depreciation and amortization for the First Two
     Quarters 1997 of $153 million plus pro forma real estate related
     depreciation and amortization for the First Two Quarters 1998 of $151
     million.
 (3) Represents pro forma portion of FFO of unconsolidated equity investments,
     net of pro forma equity in earnings of affiliates, for the fiscal year
     ended January 2, 1998 of $39 million minus pro forma portion of FFO of
     unconsolidated equity investments, net of pro forma equity in earnings of
     affiliates, for the First Two Quarters 1997 of $15 million plus pro forma
     portion of FFO of unconsolidated equity investments, net of pro forma
     equity in earnings of affiliates, for the First Two Quarters 1998 of $16
     million.
 (4) Represents pro forma one-time gain for the last two quarters 1997 of $10
     million.
 (5) Represents pro forma portion of FFO relating to minority owners, net of
     pro forma portion of minority interest relating to OP Units, for the
     fiscal year ended January 2, 1998 of $10 million minus pro forma portion
     of FFO relating to minority owners, net of pro forma portion of minority
     interest relating to OP Units, for the First Two Quarters 1997 of $5
     million plus pro forma portion of FFO relating to minority owners, net of
     pro forma portion of minority interest relating to OP Units, for the
     First Two Quarters 1998 of $3 million.
 (6) Represents pro forma FF&E reserves for the fiscal year ended January 2,
     1998 of $174 million minus pro forma FF&E reserves for the First Two
     Quarters 1997 of $83 million plus pro forma FF&E reserves for the First
     Two Quarters 1998 of $88 million.
 (7) Represents pro forma FF&E reserves of unconsolidated equity investments
     for the fiscal year ended January 2, 1998 of $5 million minus pro forma
     FF&E reserves of unconsolidated equity investments for the First Two
     Quarters 1997 of $3 million plus pro forma FF&E reserves of
     unconsolidated equity investments for the First Two Quarters 1998 of $2
     million.
 (8) Represents pro forma FF&E reserves of minority interests for the fiscal
     year ended January 2, 1998 of $4 million minus pro forma FF&E reserves of
     minority interests for the First Two Quarters 1997 of $2 million plus pro
     forma FF&E reserves of minority interests for the First Two Quarters 1998
     of $3 million.
 (9) Represents pro forma principal repayments for the fiscal year ended
     January 2, 1998 of $94 million minus pro forma principal repayments for
     the First Two Quarters 1997 of $64 million plus pro forma principal
     repayments for the First Two Quarters 1998 of $39 million.
(10) Represents the deferred rental revenue as of June 19, 1998 of $234
     million, less the deferred rental revenue as of June 20, 1997 of $182
     million, as required under EITF 98-9. EITF 98-9 has no effect on annual
     revenues and, accordingly, the difference in the deferred rental revenue
     between periods has been added back to calculate estimated pro forma cash
     available for distribution for the twelve months ending December 31,
     1999.
 
                                      104

<PAGE>
 
(11) Based on a total of 268.7 million OP Units outstanding on a pro forma
     basis after the Partnership Mergers (based upon the maximum price of $
     per OP Unit), and the preliminary estimated cash distributions during the
     twelve months ending December 31, 1999 of $0.84 per OP Unit.
(12) Based on a total of 268.7 million OP Units outstanding on a pro forma
     basis after the Partnership Mergers (based upon the maximum price of $
     per OP Unit).
 
  If Host's preliminary estimate of $226 million of cash distributions by the
Operating Partnership during the twelve months ending December 31, 1999 proves
accurate but the Operating Partnership's cash available for distribution
during the twelve months ending December 31, 1999 were only $214 million, then
the Operating Partnership would be required to borrow approximately $13
million (including estimated interest thereon of $1 million) to make such
distributions to enable Host REIT to distribute 100% of its estimated taxable
income in accordance with its distribution policy. While the Operating
Partnership does not believe this will be necessary, it believes it would be
able to borrow the necessary amounts under the New Credit Facility or from
other sources and that any such borrowing would not have a material adverse
effect on its financial condition or results of operations.
 
  Investors are cautioned that Host expects that its preliminary estimate of
1999 taxable income (and the resulting estimated distributions during 1999)
may materially change as a result of issuances of additional common or
preferred stock by Host either prior to or following the Partnership Mergers
(which could reduce the distribution per OP Unit in accordance with its
distribution policy), changes in operations, acquisitions or dispositions of
assets, changes in the preliminary estimate of taxable income for 1999 and
various other factors (some of which may be beyond the control of Host REIT
and the Operating Partnership). Distributions will be made in the discretion
of Host REIT's Board of Directors and will be affected by a number of factors,
including the rental payments received by the Operating Partnership from the
Lessees with respect to the Leases of the Hotels, the operating expenses of
the Operating Partnership, the level of borrowings and interest expense
incurred in borrowing, the Operating Partnership's financial condition and
cash available for distribution, the taxable income of Host REIT and the
Operating Partnership, the effects of acquisitions and dispositions of assets,
unanticipated capital expenditures and distributions required to be made on
any preferred units issued by the Operating Partnership. Actual results may
vary substantially from the estimates and no assurance can be given that the
Operating Partnership's estimates will prove accurate or that any level of
distributions will be made or sustained.
 
  For a discussion of the tax treatment of distributions to the holders of
Host REIT Common Stock, see "Federal Income Tax Consequences--Taxation of
Taxable U.S. Stockholders Generally," "--Taxation of Tax-Exempt Stockholders
of Host REIT" and "--Taxation of Non-U.S. Stockholders." For a discussion of
the annual distribution requirements applicable to REITs, see "Federal Income
Tax Consequences--Federal Income Taxation of Host REIT Following the Merger--
Annual Distribution Requirements Applicable to REITs."
 
INVESTMENT POLICIES
 
  Investments in Real Estate or Interests in Real Estate. Host REIT is
required to conduct all of its investment activities through the Operating
Partnership. The Company's investment objectives are to (i) achieve long-term
sustainable growth in Funds From Operations share of Host REIT Common Stock,
(ii) increase asset values by improving and expanding the initial Hotels, as
appropriate, (iii) acquire additional existing and newly developed upscale and
luxury full-service hotels in targeted markets, (iv) develop and construct
upscale and luxury full-service hotels and (v) potentially pursue other real
estate investments. The Company's business will be primarily focused on
upscale and luxury full-service hotels. Where appropriate, and subject to REIT
qualification rules and limitations contained in the Partnership Agreement,
the Company may sell certain of its hotels.
 
  The Company also may participate with other entities in property ownership
through joint ventures or other types of co-ownership. Equity investments may
be subject to existing mortgage financing and other indebtedness or such
financing or indebtedness may be incurred in connection with acquiring
investments. Any such financing or indebtedness will have priority over the
Company's equity interest in such property.
 
                                      105

<PAGE>
 
  Investments in Real Estate Mortgages. While the Company will emphasize
equity real estate investments, it may, in its discretion, invest in mortgages
and other similar interests. The Company does not intend to invest to a
significant extent in mortgages or deeds of trust, but may acquire mortgages
as a strategy for acquiring ownership of a property or the economic equivalent
thereof, subject to the investment restrictions applicable to REITs. See
"Business and Properties--Blackstone Acquisition," "Federal Income Tax
Consequences--Federal Income Taxation of Host REIT Following the Mergers--
Income Tests Applicable to REITs" and "--Asset Tests Applicable to REITs." As
of June 19, 1998, the Company held two mortgages secured by hotels. In
addition, the Company may invest in mortgage-related securities and/or may
seek to issue securities representing interests in such mortgage-related
securities as a method of raising additional funds.
 
  Securities of or Interests in Persons Primarily Engaged in Real Estate
Activities and Other Issuers. Subject to the percentage ownership limitations
and gross and asset income tests necessary for REIT qualification, the Company
also may invest in securities of other entities engaged in real estate
activities or invest in securities of other issuers, including for the purpose
of exercising control over such entities. The Company may acquire all or
substantially all of the securities or assets of other REITs or similar
entities where such investments would be consistent with the Company's
investment policies. No such investments will be made, however, unless the
Board of Directors determines that the proposed investment would not cause
either Host REIT or the Operating Partnership to be an "investment company"
within the meaning of the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended.
 
FINANCING POLICIES
 
  The Operating Partnership's and Host REIT's organizational documents
currently contain no restrictions on incurring debt. The Company, however,
will have a policy of incurring debt only if upon such incurrence the debt-to-
total market capitalization of Host REIT and the Operating Partnership would
be 60% or less. In addition, the New Senior Notes indenture and the New Credit
Facility impose limitations on the incurrence of indebtedness. The indenture
for the Notes also limits the amount of debt that the Operating Partnership
may incur if, immediately after giving effect to the incurrence of such
additional debt, the aggregate principal amount of all outstanding debt of the
Operating Partnership and its Subsidiaries (as defined in the Indenture
relating to the Notes) on a consolidated basis (i) is greater than 60% of the
"total market capitalization" (total debt plus fully diluted market equity
value) of the Operating Partnership on the date of such incurrence or (ii) is
greater than 76% of the Operating Partnership's undepreciated total assets on
the date of such incurrence. Indentures for debt issued to replace the public
bonds may contain other restrictions. The Company may, from time to time,
reduce its outstanding indebtedness by repurchasing a portion of such
outstanding indebtedness, subject to certain restrictions contained in the
Partnership Agreement and the terms of its outstanding indebtedness. The
Company will from time to time reevaluate its borrowing policies in light of
then current economic conditions, relative costs of debt and equity capital,
market values of properties, growth and acquisition opportunities and other
factors. Consequently, the Company's financing policy is subject to
modification and change. The Company may modify its borrowing policy without
any vote of the stockholders of Host REIT.
 
  To the extent that the Board of Directors determines to seek additional
capital, the Company may raise such capital through equity offerings, debt
financing or retention of cash flow or a combination of these methods. As long
as the Operating Partnership is in existence, the net proceeds of all equity
capital raised by Host REIT will be contributed to the Operating Partnership
in exchange for OP Units in the Operating Partnership, which will dilute the
ownership interest of limited partners of the Operating Partnership.
 
  In the future, the Company may seek to extend, expand, reduce or renew its
New Credit Facility, or obtain new credit facilities or lines of credit,
subject to its general policy relating to the ratio of debt-to-total market
capitalization, for the purpose of making acquisitions or capital improvements
or providing working capital or meeting the taxable income distribution
requirements for REITs under the Code. In the future, the Company also may
determine to issue securities senior to the Host REIT Common Stock or OP
Units, including preferred shares and debt securities (either of which may be
convertible into Host REIT Common Stock or OP Units or may be accompanied by
warrants to purchase Host REIT Common Stock or OP Units).
 
                                      106

<PAGE>
 
  The Company has not established any limit on the number or amount of
mortgages that may be placed on any single hotel or on its portfolio as a
whole, although the Company's objective is to reduce its reliance on secured
indebtedness.
 
LENDING POLICIES
 
  The Company may consider offering purchase money financing in connection
with the sale of a hotel where the provision of such financing will increase
the value received by the Company for the hotel sold.
 
CONFLICTS OF INTEREST POLICIES
 
  Under the MGCL, no contract or transaction between a Maryland corporation
and any of its directors or between a Maryland corporation and any other
corporation, firm, or other entity in which any of its directors is a
director, or has a material financial interest, shall be void or voidable
solely for this reason, or solely because the director is present at the
meeting of the board or committee of the board which authorizes, approves, or
ratifies the contract or transaction, or solely because such director's or
directors' votes are counted for such purpose, if (i) the fact of common
directorship or interest is disclosed or known to the board of directors or
the committee, and the board or committee authorizes, approves, or ratifies
the contract or transaction by the affirmative vote of a majority of
disinterested directors, even if the disinterested directors constitute less
than a quorum, (ii) the fact of common directorship or interest is disclosed
or known to the stockholders entitled to vote, and the contract or transaction
is authorized, approved, or ratified by a majority of the votes cast by the
stockholders entitled to vote other than the votes of shares owned of record
or beneficially by the interested corporation, firm or other entity, or (iii)
the contract or transaction is fair and reasonable to the corporation. Common
or interested directors or the stock owned by them or by an interested
corporation, firm, or other entity may be counted in determining the presence
of a quorum at a meeting of the board of directors or a committee of the board
or at a meeting of the stockholders, as the case may be, at which the contract
or transaction is authorized, approved or ratified.
 
  Host REIT's Board of Directors also has adopted a policy to address
conflicts of interest. In addition, Maryland and Delaware law impose certain
duties on the Board of Directors and Host REIT, as general partner of the
Operating Partnership (to the extent such duties have not been eliminated
pursuant to the Host REIT Charter or the Partnership Agreement). There can be
no assurance, however, that these policies always will be successful in
eliminating the influence of such conflicts. If they are not successful,
decisions could be made that may fail to reflect fully the interests of all
holders of Host REIT Common Stock and limited partners of the Operating
Partnership.
 
  Host REIT has adopted a policy which would require that all material
contracts and transactions between Host REIT, the Operating Partnership or any
of its subsidiaries, on the one hand, and a director or executive officer of
Host REIT or any entity in which such director or executive officer is a
director or has a material financial interest, on the other hand, must be
approved by the affirmative vote of a majority of the disinterested directors.
Where appropriate in the judgment of the disinterested directors, the Board of
Directors may obtain a fairness opinion or engage independent counsel to
represent the interests of nonaffiliated security holders, although the Board
of Directors will have no obligation to do so.
 
  In addition, under Delaware law (where the Operating Partnership is formed),
Host REIT, as general partner, has a fiduciary duty to the Operating
Partnership and, consequently, such transactions are subject to the duties of
care and loyalty that Host REIT, as general partner, owes to limited partners
of the Operating Partnership (to the extent such duties have not been
eliminated pursuant to the terms of the Partnership Agreement). The
Partnership Agreement provides that (i) in considering to dispose of any of
the assets of the Operating Partnership, Host REIT shall take into account the
tax consequences to it of any such disposition and shall have no liability to
the Operating Partnership or the limited partners for decisions based upon or
influenced by such tax consequences (and the Operating Partnership generally
is obligated to pay any taxes Host REIT incurs as result of such
transactions), (ii) Host REIT, as general partner, is under no obligation to
consider the separate interests of the limited partners (including, without
limitation, tax consequences) in deciding whether to cause the Operating
 
                                      107

<PAGE>
 
Partnership to take, or decline to take, any action and (iii) any act or
omission by Host REIT, as a general partner, undertaken in the good faith
belief that such action is necessary or desirable to protect the ability of
Host REIT to continue to qualify as a REIT or to allow Host REIT to avoid
incurring liability for taxes under Section 857 or 4981 of the Code (relating
to required distributions) is deemed approved by all limited partners.
 
  J.W. Marriott, Jr. and Richard E. Marriott, who are brothers, currently
serve as directors of Host and directors (and, in the case of J.W. Marriott,
Jr., also an officer) of Marriott International. After the REIT Conversion,
J.W. Marriott, Jr. will serve as a director of Host REIT and will continue to
serve as the Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of Marriott
International, and Richard E. Marriott will serve as Chairman of the Board of
Host REIT and continue to serve as a director of Marriott International.
J.W. Marriott, Jr. and Richard E. Marriott also beneficially own
approximately % and  %, respectively, of the outstanding shares of common
stock of Marriott International and will beneficially own  % and  %,
respectively, of the outstanding shares of Crestline (but neither will serve
as an officer or director thereof). Because they will serve as directors of
Host REIT, as well as directors (and in the case of J.W. Marriott, Jr., the
Chief Executive Officer) of Marriott International they may be subject to
certain potential conflicts of interest in fulfilling their responsibilities
to Host REIT and its stockholders. See "Risk Factors--Conflicts of Interest--
Potential Conflicts Involving Marriott International."
 
POLICIES WITH RESPECT TO OTHER ACTIVITIES
 
  The Company may, but does not presently intend to, make investments other
than as previously described. Host REIT will make investments only through the
Operating Partnership. Host REIT and the Operating Partnership will have
authority to offer their securities and to repurchase or otherwise reacquire
their securities and may engage in such activities in the future. Host REIT
and the Operating Partnership also may make loans to joint ventures in which
they may participate in the future to meet working capital needs. Neither Host
REIT nor the Operating Partnership will engage in trading, underwriting,
agency distribution or sale of securities of other issuers. Host REIT's
policies with respect to such activities may be reviewed and modified from
time to time by Host REIT's directors without notice to, or the vote of, its
stockholders.
 
                                      108

<PAGE>
 
                            SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
 
  The following table presents certain selected historical financial data of
Host which has been derived from Host's audited Consolidated Financial
Statements for the five most recent fiscal years ended January 2, 1998 and the
unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements for the First Two
Quarters 1998 and First Two Quarters 1997. The income statement data for
fiscal year 1993 does not reflect the Marriott International Distribution and
related transactions and, accordingly, the table presents data for Host for
1993 that includes amounts attributable to Marriott International. As a result
of the Marriott International Distribution and related transactions, the
assets, liabilities and businesses of Host have changed substantially.
 
  The information contained in the following table is not comparable to the
operations of Host or the Operating Partnership on a going-forward basis
because the historical information relates to an operating entity which owns
and operates its hotels, while the Company will own the Hotels but will lease
them to the Lessees and receive rental payments in connection therewith.
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                             FIRST
                         TWO QUARTERS                   FISCAL YEAR
                         --------------  ----------------------------------------------
                          1998    1997   1997(1)  1996(2)  1995(3)  1994(1)  1993(1)(4)
                         ------  ------  -------  -------  -------  -------  ----------
                          (UNAUDITED)         (IN MILLIONS)
<S>                      <C>     <C>     <C>      <C>      <C>      <C>      <C>
INCOME STATEMENT DATA:
 Revenues............... $  747  $  522  $1,147   $  732   $  484   $  380     $  659
 Operating profit.......    374     215     449      233      114      152         92
 Interest expense.......    162     122     302      237      178      165        164
 Income (loss) from con-
  tinuing operations....     96      32      47      (13)     (62)     (13)        56
 Net income (loss)(5)...     96      37      50      (13)    (143)     (25)        50
OTHER OPERATING DATA:
 Cash from operations...    206     193     464      201      142      146        415
 Cash provided by (used
  in) investing activi-
  ties..................     11    (200) (1,046)    (504)    (208)    (178)      (262)
 Cash provided by (used
  in) financing activi-
  ties..................   (213)   (188)    389      806      200       26       (389)
 Comparative FFO(6) (un-
  audited)..............    206     145     295      164      136      N/A        N/A
 Depreciation and amor-
  tization..............    125     102     240      168      122      113        N/A
RATIO DATA (UNAUDITED):
 Ratio of earnings to
  fixed charges(7)......   2.0x    1.5x    1.3x     1.0x       --       --        N/A
 Deficiency of earnings
  to fixed charges(7)...     --      --      --       --       70       12        N/A
BALANCE SHEET DATA:
 Cash, cash equivalents
  and short-term
  marketable
  securities............ $  561  $  509  $  865   $  704   $  201   $   67     $   73
 Total assets...........  6,765   5,324   6,526    5,152    3,557    3,366      3,362
 Debt...................  3,784   2,715   3,783    2,647    2,178    1,871      2,113
</TABLE>

- --------
(1) In the First Two Quarters 1997 and fiscal year 1997, Host recognized a $5
    million and a $3 million, respectively, extraordinary gain, net of taxes,
    on the extinguishment of certain debt. In 1994, Host recognized a $6
    million extraordinary loss, net of taxes, on the required redemption of
    senior notes. In 1993, Host recognized a $4 million extraordinary loss,
    net of taxes, on the completion of an exchange offer for its then
    outstanding bonds.
(2) Fiscal year 1996 includes 53 weeks.
(3) Operating results for 1995 include a $10 million pre-tax charge to write
    down the carrying value of five limited service properties to their net
    realizable value and a $60 million pre-tax charge to write down an
    undeveloped land parcel to its estimated sales value. In 1995, Host
    recognized a $20 million extraordinary loss, net of taxes, on the
    extinguishment of debt.
(4) Operating results for 1993 include the operations of Marriott
    International through the Marriott International Distribution date of
    October 8, 1993. These operations had a net pre-tax effect on income of
    $211 million for the year ended December 31, 1993 and are recorded as
    "Profit from operations distributed to Marriott International" on Host's
    consolidated statements of operations and are, therefore, not included in
    sales, operating profit before corporate expenses and interest, interest
    expense and interest income for the same period. The net pre-tax effect of
    these operations is, however, included in income before income taxes,
    extraordinary item and cumulative effect of changes in accounting
    principles and in net income for the same periods. Statement of Financial
    Accounting Standards ("SFAS") No. 109, "Accounting for Income Taxes," was
    adopted in the first quarter of 1993. In the second quarter of 1993, Host
    changed its accounting method for assets held for sale. During 1993, Host
    recorded a $34 million credit to reflect the adoption of SFAS No. 109 and
    a $32 million charge, net of taxes, to reflect the change in its
    accounting method for assets held for sale. Operating results in 1993
    included pre-tax expenses related to the Marriott International
    Distribution totaling $13 million.
(5) Host recorded a loss from discontinued operations, net of taxes, as a
    result of the Special Dividend (as defined herein) of $61 million in 1995,
    $6 million in 1994, and $4 million in 1993. The 1995 loss from
    discontinued operations includes a pre-tax charge of $47 million
 
                                      109

<PAGE>
 
    for the adoption of SFAS No. 121, "Accounting For the Impairment of Long-
    Lived Assets and Long-Lived Assets to be Disposed Of," a pre-tax $15 million
    restructuring charge and an extraordinary loss of $10 million, net of taxes,
    on the extinguishment of debt.
(6) Host considers Comparative Funds From Operations ("Comparative FFO," which
    represents Funds From Operations, as defined by NAREIT, plus deferred tax
    expense) a meaningful disclosure that will help the investment community
    to better understand the financial performance of Host, including enabling
    its stockholders and analysts to more easily compare Host's performance to
    REITs. FFO is defined by NAREIT as net income computed in accordance with
    GAAP, excluding gains or losses from debt restructurings and sales of
    properties, plus real estate related depreciation and amortization, and
    after adjustments for unconsolidated partnerships and joint ventures. FFO
    should not be considered as an alternative to net income, operating
    profit, cash flows from operations or any other operating or liquidity
    performance measure prescribed by GAAP. FFO is also not an indicator of
    funds available to fund Host's cash needs, including its ability to make
    distributions. Host's method of calculating FFO may be different from
    methods used by other REITs and, accordingly, may not be comparable to
    such other REITs.
(7) The ratio of earnings to fixed charges is computed by dividing net income
    before interest expense and other fixed charges by total fixed charges,
    including interest expense, amortization of debt issuance costs and the
    portion of rent expense that is deemed to represent interest. The
    deficiency of earnings to fixed charges is largely the result of
    depreciation and amortization of $122 million and $113 million in 1995 and
    1994, respectively.
 
                                      110

<PAGE>
 

          MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
                           AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
LACK OF COMPARABILITY FOLLOWING THE MERGER AND THE REIT CONVERSION
 
  Because substantially all of the Company's Hotels will be leased following
the Merger and as a result of the other transactions comprising the REIT
Conversion, the Company does not believe that the historical results of
operations will be comparable to the results of operations of Host following
the REIT Conversion. For pro forma information giving effect to the Merger and
the REIT Conversion (including the Leases), see "Unaudited Pro Forma Financial
Information."
 
HISTORICAL RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
  Revenues primarily represent house profit from hotel properties and senior
living communities, net gains (losses) on property transactions and equity in
the earnings (losses) of affiliates. House profit reflects the net revenues
flowing to Host as property owner and represents gross hotel sales less
property-level expenses (excluding depreciation, management fees, property
taxes, ground and equipment rent, insurance and certain other costs which are
classified as operating costs and expenses included in the accompanying
financial statements). Other operating costs and expenses include idle land
carrying costs and certain other costs.
 
  Host's hotel operating costs and expenses are, to a great extent, fixed.
Therefore, Host derives substantial operating leverage from increases in
revenue. This operating leverage is somewhat diluted, however, by the impact
of base management fees which are calculated as a percentage of sales,
variable lease payments and incentive management fees tied to operating
performance above certain established levels. Successful hotel performance
resulted in certain of Host's properties reaching levels which allowed the
manager to share in the growth of profits in the form of higher management
fees. Host expects that this trend will continue in 1998 as the upscale and
luxury full-service segments continue to strengthen. At these higher operating
levels, Host's and the managers' interests are closely aligned, which helps to
drive further increases in profitability, but moderates operating leverage.
 
  For the periods discussed herein, Host's hotel properties have experienced
substantial increases in room revenues generated per available room
("REVPAR"). REVPAR is a commonly used indicator of market performance for
hotels which represents the combination of the average daily room rate charged
and the average occupancy achieved. REVPAR does not include food and beverage
or other ancillary revenues generated by the property. The REVPAR increase
primarily represents strong percentage increases in room rates, while
occupancy increases have been more moderate. Increases in average room rates
have generally been achieved by the managers through shifting occupancies away
from discounted group business to higher-rated group and transient business
and by selectively increasing room rates. This has been made possible by
increased travel due to improved economic conditions and by the favorable
supply/demand characteristics existing in the upscale and luxury full-service
segments of the lodging industry. Host expects this favorable relationship
between supply growth and demand growth to continue in the upscale and luxury
markets in which it operates, which should result in improved REVPAR and
operating profits at its hotel properties in the near term. However, there can
be no assurance that REVPAR will continue to increase in the future.
 
FIRST TWO QUARTERS 1998 COMPARED TO FIRST TWO QUARTERS 1997 (HISTORICAL)
 
  Revenues. Revenues primarily represent house profit from Host's hotel
properties, net gains (losses) on property transactions and equity in earnings
(losses) of affiliates. Revenues increased $225 million, or 43%, to $747
million for the twenty-four weeks ended June 19, 1998 ("First Two Quarters
1998") from $522 million for the twenty-four weeks ended June 20, 1997 ("First
Two Quarters 1997"). Host's revenue and operating profit were impacted by
improved lodging results for comparable full-service hotel properties, the
addition of 18 full-service hotel properties during 1997 and eight full-
service properties during the First Two Quarters 1998, the acquisition of 30
senior living communities in 1997 and one senior living community in 1998 and
the gain on the sale of two hotel properties in the First Two Quarters 1998.
 
                                      111

<PAGE>
 
  Hotel sales (gross hotel sales, including room sales, food and beverage
sales, and other ancillary sales such as telephone sales) increased $317
million, or 25%, to $1,574 million in the First Two Quarters 1998, reflecting
the REVPAR increases for comparable units and the addition of full-service
properties in 1997 and 1998. Improved results for Host's full-service hotels
were driven by strong increases in REVPAR for comparable units of 8.2% to
$116.66 for the First Two Quarters 1998. Results were further enhanced by a
one percentage point increase in the house profit margin for comparable full-
service properties. On a comparable basis for Host's full-service hotel
properties, average room rates increased over eight percent, while average
occupancy decreased slightly.
 
  Revenues generated from Host's 31 senior living communities totaled $39
million for the First Two Quarters 1998. For the First Two Quarters 1998,
average occupancy was almost 92% and the average per diem rate was almost $88,
which resulted in revenue per available unit ("REVPAU") of $80.65. Senior
living communities' sales totaled $110 million for the First Two Quarters
1998.
 
  Revenues were also impacted by the gains on the sales of two hotel
properties. The New York East Side Marriott was sold for $191 million
resulting in a pre-tax gain of approximately $40 million. The Napa Valley
Marriott was sold for $21 million resulting in a pre-tax gain of approximately
$10 million.
 
  Operating Costs and Expenses. Operating costs and expenses principally
consist of depreciation, management fees, property taxes, ground, building and
equipment rent, insurance and certain other costs. Operating costs and
expenses increased $66 million to $373 million in the First Two Quarters 1998
from $307 million for the First Two Quarters 1997, primarily representing
increased hotel and senior living communities' operating costs, including
depreciation and management fees. Hotel operating costs increased $52 million
to $343 million for the First Two Quarters 1998 primarily due to the addition
of 26 full-service properties during 1997 and the First Two Quarters 1998 and
increased management fees and rentals tied to improved property results. As a
percentage of hotel revenues, hotel operating costs and expenses decreased to
53% of revenues in the First Two Quarters 1998 from 57% of revenues in the
First Two Quarters 1997 due to the significant increases in REVPAR discussed
above, as well as the operating leverage as a result of a significant portion
of Host's hotel operating costs and expenses being fixed. Host's senior living
communities' operating costs and expenses were $20 million for the First Two
Quarters 1998.
 
  Operating Profit. As a result of the changes in revenues and operating costs
and expenses discussed above, Host's operating profit increased $159 million,
or 74%, to $374 million for the First Two Quarters 1998. Hotel operating
profit increased $88 million, or 40%, to $309 million, or 47% of hotel
revenues, for the First Two Quarters 1998 from $221 million, or 43% of hotel
revenues, for the First Two Quarters 1997. Specifically, hotels in New York
City and Toronto reported significant improvements for the First Two Quarters
1998. Results in Mexico City have also improved as the Mexican economy
continues to strengthen. Properties in Florida reported some minor softness in
results due to exceptionally poor weather in 1998. Host's senior living
communities generated $19 million of operating profit for the First Two
Quarters 1998.
 
  Minority Interest. Minority interest expense increased $6 million to $30
million for the First Two Quarters 1998, primarily reflecting the impact of
the consolidation of affiliated partnerships and the acquisition of
controlling interests in newly-formed partnerships during 1997 and the First
Two Quarters 1998.
 
  Corporate Expenses. Corporate expenses increased $3 million to $21 million
for the First Two Quarters 1998. As a percentage of revenues, corporate
expenses decreased to 2.8% of revenues for the First Two Quarters 1998 from
3.4% in the First Two Quarters 1997, reflecting Host's efforts to control its
corporate expenses in spite of the substantial growth in revenues.
 
  REIT Conversion Expenses. REIT Conversion Expenses reflect the professional
fees and other expenses associated with the Company's conversion to a REIT.
 
  Interest Expense. Interest expense increased 33% to $162 million in the
First Two Quarters 1998, primarily due to additional debt of approximately
$580 million assumed in connection with the 1997 and 1998
 
                                      112

<PAGE>
 
full-service hotel additions, approximately $300 million assumed in connection
with the acquisition of senior living communities as well as the issuance of
$600 million of 8 7/8% senior notes in July 1997.
 
  Dividends on Convertible Preferred Securities. The Dividends on Convertible
Preferred Securities reflect the dividends accrued on the $550 million in
6.75% Convertible Preferred Securities issued by Host in December 1996.
 
  Interest Income. Interest income increased $3 million to $25 million for the
First Two Quarters 1998, primarily reflecting interest earned on cash held for
future hotel investments.
 
  Income before Extraordinary Item. Income before extraordinary item for the
First Two Quarters 1998 was $96 million, compared to $32 million for the First
Two Quarters 1997.
 
  Extraordinary Gain. In March 1997, Host purchased 100% of the outstanding
bonds secured by a first mortgage on the San Francisco Marriott Hotel. Host
purchased the bonds for $219 million, which was an $11 million discount to the
face value of $230 million. In connection with the redemption and defeasance
of the bonds, Host recognized an extraordinary gain of $5 million, which
represents the $11 million discount and the write-off of deferred financing
fees, net of taxes.
 
  Net Income. Host's net income for the First Two Quarters 1998 was $96
million compared to $37 million for the First Two Quarters 1997. For the First
Two Quarters 1998 and 1997, basic earnings per common share were $.47 and
$.18, respectively and diluted earnings per common share were $.45 and $.18,
respectively.
 
1997 COMPARED TO 1996 (HISTORICAL)
 
  Revenues. Revenues increased $415 million, or 57%, to $1.1 billion for 1997.
Host's revenue and operating profit were impacted by:
 
  -- improved lodging results for comparable full-service hotel properties;
 
  -- the addition of 23 full-service hotel properties during 1996 and 18
     full-service properties during 1997;
 
  -- the addition of 30 senior living communities in 1997;
 
  -- the 1996 sale and leaseback of 16 Courtyard properties and 18 Residence
     Inns; and
 
  -- the 1997 results including 52 weeks versus 53 weeks in 1996.
 
  Hotel sales increased $864 million, or 44%, to over $2.8 billion in 1997,
reflecting the REVPAR increases for comparable units and the addition of full-
service properties during 1996 and 1997. Improved results for the Company's
full-service hotels were driven by strong increases in REVPAR for comparable
units of 12.6% in 1997. Results were further enhanced by a more than two
percentage point increase in the house profit margin for comparable full-
service properties. On a comparable basis for Host's full-service properties,
average room rates increased almost 11%, while average occupancy increased
over one percentage point.
 
  Revenues generated from Host's 1997 third quarter acquisition of 29 senior
living communities totaled $37 million. During 1997, average occupancy of the
communities was 92% and the average per diem rate was $84, which resulted in
1997 REVPAR of $77. Overall occupancies for 1997 were lower than the
historical and anticipated future occupancies due to the significant number of
expansion units added during the year, the overall disruption to the
communities as a result of the construction and the time required to fill the
expansion units. Senior living communities' sales totaled $111 million for
1997.
 
  Operating Costs and Expenses. Operating costs and expenses increased $199
million to $698 million for 1997, primarily representing increased hotel and
senior living communities' operating costs, including depreciation and
management fees. Hotel operating costs increased $188 million to $649 million,
primarily due to the addition of 41 full-service properties during 1996 and
1997, and increased management fees and rentals tied to improved property
results. As a percentage of hotel revenues, hotel operating costs and expenses
 
                                      113

<PAGE>
 
decreased to 59% of revenues for 1997, from 64% of revenues for 1996,
reflecting the impact of increased 1997 revenues on relatively fixed operating
costs and expenses. Host's senior living communities operating costs and
expenses were $20 million (54% of revenues) for 1997.
 
  Operating Profit. As a result of the changes in revenues and operating costs
and expenses discussed above, Host's operating profit increased $216 million,
or 93%, to $449 million in 1997. Hotel operating profit increased $188
million, or 73%, to $444 million, or 41% of hotel revenues, for 1997 compared
to $256 million, or 36% of hotel revenues, for 1996. In nearly all markets,
Host's hotels recorded improvements in comparable operating results. In
particular, Host's hotels in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic and Pacific coast
regions benefited from the upscale and luxury full-service room supply and
demand imbalance. Hotels in New York City, Philadelphia, San Francisco/Silicon
Valley and in Southern California performed particularly well. In 1998, Host
expects results to be strong in these markets and other gateway cities in
which the Company owns hotels. In 1997, Host's suburban Atlanta properties
(three properties totaling 1,022 rooms) generally reported decreased results
due to higher activity in 1996 related to the Summer Olympics and the impact
of the additional supply added to the suburban areas. However, the majority of
Host's hotel rooms in Atlanta are in the core business districts in downtown
and Buckhead where they realized strong year-over-year results and were only
marginally impacted by the additional supply. Host's senior living communities
generated $17 million (46% of revenues) of operating profit.
 
  Minority Interest. Minority interest expense increased $26 million to $32
million for 1997, primarily reflecting the impact of the consolidation of
affiliated partnerships and the acquisition of controlling interests in newly-
formed partnerships during 1996 and 1997.
 
  Corporate Expenses. Corporate expenses increased $4 million to $47 million
in 1997. As a percentage of revenues, corporate expenses decreased to 4.1% of
revenues in 1997 from 5.9% of revenues in 1996. This reflects Host's efforts
to control its corporate expenses in spite of the substantial growth in
revenues.
 
  Interest Expense. Interest expense increased $65 million to $302 million in
1997, primarily due to the additional mortgage debt of approximately $1.1
billion assumed in connection with the 1996 and 1997 full-service hotel
additions, approximately $315 million in debt incurred in conjunction with the
acquisition of senior living communities, as well as the issuance of $600
million of 8 7/8% senior notes in July 1997.
 
  Dividends on Convertible Preferred Securities of Subsidiary Trust. The
dividends on the Convertible Preferred Securities reflect the dividends on the
$550 million in 6.75% Convertible Preferred Securities issued by Host in
December 1996.
 
  Interest Income. Interest income increased $4 million to $52 million for
1997, primarily reflecting the interest income on the available proceeds
generated by the December 1996 offering of Convertible Preferred Securities
and the proceeds generated by the issuance of the 8 7/8% senior notes in July
1997.
 
  Income (Loss) Before Extraordinary Items. Income before extraordinary items
for 1997 was $47 million, compared to a $13 million loss before extraordinary
items for 1996 as a result of the items discussed above.
 
  Extraordinary Gain (Loss). In March 1997, Host purchased 100% of the
outstanding bonds secured by a first mortgage on the San Francisco Marriott
Hotel. Host purchased the bonds for $219 million, which was an $11 million
discount to the face value of $230 million. In connection with the redemption
and defeasance of the bonds, Host recognized an extraordinary gain of $5
million, which represents the $11 million discount less the write-off of
unamortized deferred financing fees, net of taxes. In December 1997, Host
refinanced the mortgage debt secured by Marriott's Orlando World Center. In
connection with the refinancing, Host recognized an extraordinary loss of $2
million, which represents payment of a prepayment penalty and the write-off of
unamortized deferred financing fees, net of taxes.
 
  Net Income (Loss). The Company's net income in 1997 was $50 million,
compared to a net loss of $13 million in 1996.
 
                                      114

<PAGE>
 
1996 COMPARED TO 1995 (HISTORICAL)
 
  Revenues. Revenues increased $248 million, or 51%, to $732 million in 1996.
Host's revenue and operating profit were impacted by:
 
  -- improved lodging results for comparable full-service hotel properties;
 
  -- the addition of nine full-service hotel properties during 1995 and 23
     full-service properties during 1996;
 
  -- the 1996 and 1995 sale and leaseback of 53 of Host's Courtyard
     properties and 18 of Host's Residence Inns;
 
  -- the 1996 change in the estimated depreciable lives and salvage values
     for certain hotel properties which resulted in additional depreciation
     expense of $15 million;
 
  -- the 1996 results including 53 weeks versus 52 weeks in 1995;
 
  -- the $60 million pre-tax charge in 1995 to write down the carrying value
     of one undeveloped land parcel to its estimated sales value;
 
  -- a $10 million pre-tax charge in 1995 to write down the carrying value of
     certain Courtyard and Residence Inn properties held for sale to their
     net realizable values included in "Net gains (losses) on property
     transactions"; and
 
  -- the 1995 sale of four Fairfield Inns.
 
  Hotel revenues increased $243 million, or 51%, to $717 million in 1996, as
all three of Host's lodging concepts reported growth in REVPAR. Hotel sales
increased $590 million, or 44%, to $1.9 billion in 1996, reflecting the REVPAR
increases for comparable units and the addition of full-service properties
during 1995 and 1996.
 
  Improved results for Host's full-service hotels were driven by strong
increases in REVPAR for comparable units of 11% in 1996. Results were further
enhanced by an almost two percentage point increase in the house profit margin
for comparable full-service properties. On a comparable basis for Host's full-
service properties, average room rates increased 8%, while average occupancy
increased over two percentage points.
 
  Operating Costs and Expenses. Operating costs and expenses increased $129
million to $499 million for 1996, primarily representing increased hotel
operating costs, including depreciation, partially offset by the $60 million
pre-tax charge in 1995 to write down the carrying value of one undeveloped
land parcel to its estimated sales value. Hotel operating costs increased $180
million to $461 million, primarily due to the addition of 32 full-service
properties during 1995 and 1996, increased management fees and rentals tied to
improved property results and a change in the depreciable lives and salvage
values of certain large hotel properties ($15 million). As a percentage of
hotel revenues, hotel operating costs and expenses increased to 64% of
revenues for 1996, from 59% of revenues for 1995, reflecting the impact of the
lease payments on the Courtyard and Residence Inn properties which have been
sold and leased back, and the change in depreciable lives and salvage values
for certain large hotel properties discussed above, as well as the shifting
emphasis to full-service properties. Full-service hotel rooms accounted for
100% of Host's total hotel rooms on January 3, 1997, versus 84% on December
29, 1995.
 
  Operating Profit. As a result of the changes in revenues and operating costs
and expenses discussed above, Host's operating profit increased $119 million,
or 104%, to $233 million in 1996. Hotel operating profit increased $63
million, or 33%, to $256 million, or 36% of hotel revenues, for 1996 compared
to $193 million, or 41% of hotel revenues, for 1995. Across the board, the
Company's hotels recorded substantial improvements in comparable operating
results. In addition, several hotels, including the New York Marriott Marquis,
the New York Marriott East Side, the Philadelphia Marriott, the San Francisco
Marriott and the Miami Airport Marriott posted particularly significant
improvements in operating profit for the year. Host's Atlanta properties also
posted outstanding results, primarily due to the 1996 Summer Olympics.
Additionally, several hotels which recently converted to the Marriott brand,
including the Denver Marriott Tech Center, the Marriott's Mountain Resort at
 
                                      115

<PAGE>
 
Vail and the Williamsburg Marriott, recorded strong results compared to the
prior year as they completed renovations and began to realize the benefit of
their conversions.
 
  Corporate Expenses. Corporate expenses increased $7 million to $43 million
in 1996. As a percentage of revenues, corporate expenses decreased to 5.9% of
revenues in 1996 from 7.4% of revenues in 1995. This reflects Host's efforts
to control its corporate administrative expenses in spite of the substantial
growth in revenues.
 
  Interest Expense. Interest expense increased 33% to $237 million in 1996,
primarily due to the additional mortgage debt of approximately $696 million
incurred in connection with the 1996 full-service hotel additions and the
issuance of $350 million of notes issued by HMC Acquisition Properties, Inc.,
a wholly-owned subsidiary of Host, in December 1995, partially offset by the
net impact of the 1995 redemptions of Host Marriott Hospitality, Inc. notes
("Hospitality Notes").
 
  Loss from Continuing Operations. The loss from continuing operations for
1996 decreased $49 million to $13 million, as a result of the changes
discussed above.
 
  Net Loss. Host's net loss in 1996 was $13 million, compared to a net loss of
$143 million in 1995, which included a $61 million loss from discontinued
operations and a $20 million extraordinary loss primarily representing
premiums paid on bond redemptions and the write-off of deferred financing fees
and discounts on the debt. The basic and diluted loss per common share was
$.07 for 1996 and $.90 for 1995.
 
PRO FORMA RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
  Because substantially all of the Company's Hotels will be leased to the
Lessees following the REIT Conversion, the Company does not believe that the
Company's historical results of operations will be comparable to the results
of operations of the Company following the REIT Conversion. Accordingly, a
comparison of the Company's pro forma results of operations for the First Two
Quarters 1998 to First Two Quarters 1997 and fiscal year 1997 to fiscal year
1996 have been included below. The following discussion and analysis should be
read in conjunction with the Company's combined consolidated financial
statements and the Company's unaudited pro forma financial statements and
related notes thereto included elsewhere in this Proxy Statement/Prospectus.
The following discussion and analysis has been prepared assuming the following
two scenarios:
 
  . All Partnerships participate in the Partnership Mergers and no Notes are
    issued ("100% Participation with No Notes Issued").
 
  . All Partnerships participate in the Partnership Mergers and Notes are
    issued with respect to 100% of the OP Units allocable to each Partnership
    ("100% Participation with Notes Issued").
 
  These presentations do not purport to represent what combination will result
from the REIT Conversion, but instead are designed to illustrate what the
composition of the Company would have been like under the above scenarios.
Furthermore, the unaudited pro forma financial statements do not purport to
represent what the Company's results of operations or cash flows would
actually have been if the REIT Conversion had in fact occurred on such date or
at the beginning of such period or to project the Company's results of
operations or cash flows for any future date or period.
 
                                      116

<PAGE>
 
100% PARTICIPATION WITH NO NOTES ISSUED--FIRST TWO QUARTERS 1998 COMPARED TO
FIRST TWO QUARTERS 1997 (PRO FORMA)
 
  The following table presents the results of operations for the First Two
Quarters 1998 and the First Two Quarters 1997 on a pro forma basis under the
scenarios discussed above:
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                    100% PARTICIPATION     100% PARTICIPATION
                                   WITH NO NOTES ISSUED     WITH NOTES ISSUED
                                   ----------------------  --------------------
                                    FIRST TWO QUARTERS     FIRST TWO QUARTERS
                                   ----------------------  --------------------
                                      1998        1997       1998       1997
                                   ----------  ----------  ---------  ---------
                                                 (IN MILLIONS)
<S>                                <C>         <C>         <C>        <C>
Rental revenues..................  $      396  $      391  $     396  $     391
Total revenues...................         399         391        399        391
Operating costs and expenses.....         299         300        298        299
Operating profit before minority
 interest, corporate expenses and
 interest expense................         100          91        101         92
Minority interest................         (11)         (7)       (11)        (7)
Corporate expenses...............         (20)        (18)       (20)       (18)
Interest expense.................        (216)       (221)      (224)      (229)
Interest income..................          13          13         13         13
                                   ----------  ----------  ---------  ---------
Income (loss) before income
 taxes...........................        (134)       (142)      (141)      (149)
Benefit (provision) for income
 taxes...........................           7           7          7          7
                                   ----------  ----------  ---------  ---------
Income (loss) before
 extraordinary items.............  $     (127) $     (135) $    (134) $    (142)
                                   ==========  ==========  =========  =========
</TABLE>

 
  Revenues. Revenues primarily represent lease revenues, net gains (losses) on
property transactions and equity in earnings (losses) of affiliates, including
the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries. Revenues increased $8 million, or 2%, to $399
million for the First Two Quarters 1998 from $391 million for the First Two
Quarters 1997. EITF 98-9, "Accounting for Contingent Rents in Interim
Financial Periods," requires a lessor to defer recognition of contingent
rental income in interim periods until the specified target that triggers the
contingent rental income is achieved. Based on the structure of the Company's
leases, only minimum rent was recorded in the First Two Quarters 1998 and
First Two Quarters 1997. On a pro forma basis, the Company would have received
rental payments of $630 million and $573 million, respectively, resulting in
deferred revenue of $234 million and $182 million, respectively, for the First
Two Quarters 1998 and First Two Quarters 1997.
 
  Hotel sales (gross hotel sales, including room sales, food and beverage
sales, and other ancillary sales such as telephone sales) increased $136
million, or 8.1%, to over $1.9 billion in the First Two Quarters 1998,
reflecting the REVPAR increases for the Company's hotels. Improved results for
the Company's hotels were driven by strong increases in REVPAR of 8.3% to
$113.67 for the First Two Quarters 1998. Average room rates increased 9%,
while average occupancy decreased slightly to 77.8%.
 
  Operating Costs and Expenses. Operating costs and expenses principally
consist of depreciation, property taxes, ground, rent, insurance and certain
other costs. Operating costs and expenses decreased $1 million to $299 million
in the First Two Quarters 1998. As a percentage of rental revenues, hotel
operating costs and expenses decreased to 74% of rental revenues in the First
Two Quarters 1998 from 75% of rental revenues in the First Two Quarters 1997
due to the increase in minimum rent under the Company's leases.
 
  Operating Profit. As a result of the changes in rental revenues and
operating costs and expenses discussed above, the Company's operating profit
increased $9 million, or 10%, to $100 million for the First Two Quarters 1998.
Hotel operating profit increased $4 million, or 4%, to $102 million, or 26% of
rental revenues, for the First Two Quarters 1998 from $97 million, or 25% of
rental revenues, for the First Two Quarters 1997. The Company's hotels
recorded significant improvements in comparable operating results, however,
due to the adoption of EITF 98-9, only minimum rent could be recorded.
Specifically, hotels in New
 
                                      117

<PAGE>
 
York City, Boston, Toronto and Atlanta reported significant improvements for
the First Two Quarters 1998. Properties in Florida reported some temporary
declines in operating results due to exceptionally poor weather in 1998.
 
  Minority Interest. Minority interest expense increased $4 million to $11
million for the First Two Quarters 1998, primarily reflecting improved lodging
results.
 
  Corporate Expenses. Corporate expenses increased $2 million to $20 million
for the First Two Quarters 1998 due to increased staffing levels and the
impact of inflation.
 
  Interest Expense. Interest expense decreased $5 million to $216 million in
the First Two Quarters 1998, primarily due to the impact of principal
amortization on the Company's mortgage debt.
 
  Interest Income. Interest income was unchanged at $13 million for the First
Two Quarters 1998 and First Two Quarters 1997.
 
  Loss before Extraordinary Items. The loss before extraordinary items for the
First Two Quarters 1998 was $127 million, compared to $135 million for the
First Two Quarters 1997.
 
100% PARTICIPATION WITH NOTES ISSUED--FIRST TWO QUARTERS 1998 COMPARED TO
FIRST TWO QUARTERS 1997 (PRO FORMA)
 
  Revenues. Revenues increased $8 million, or 2%, to $399 million for the
First Two Quarters 1998 from $391 million for the First Two Quarters 1997.
Based on the structure of the Company's leases, only minimum rent was recorded
in the First Two Quarters 1998 and First Two Quarters 1997. On a pro forma
basis, the Company would have received rental payments of $630 million and
$573 million, respectively, resulting in deferred revenue of $234 million and
$182 million, respectively, for the First Two Quarters 1998 and First Two
Quarters 1997.
 
  Hotel sales (gross hotel sales, including room sales, food and beverage
sales, and other ancillary sales such as telephone sales) increased $136
million, or 8.1%, to over $1.9 billion in the First Two Quarters 1998,
reflecting the REVPAR increases for the Company's hotels. Improved results for
the Company's hotels were driven by strong increases in REVPAR of 8.3% to
$113.67 for the First Two Quarters 1998. Average room rates increased 9%,
while average occupancy decreased slightly to 77.8%.
 
  Operating Costs and Expenses. Operating costs and expenses decreased $1
million to $298 million in the First Two Quarters 1998. As a percentage of
rental revenues, hotel operating costs and expenses decreased to 74% of
revenues in the First Two Quarters 1998 from 75% of rental revenues in the
First Two Quarters 1997 due to the increase in minimum rent under the
Company's leases.
 
  Operating Profit. As a result of the changes in rental revenues and
operating costs and expenses discussed above, the Company's operating profit
increased $9 million, or 10%, to $100 million for the First Two Quarters 1998.
Hotel operating profit increased $6 million, or 6%, to $103 million, or 26% of
rental revenues, for the First Two Quarters 1998 from $97 million, or 25% of
rental revenues, for the First Two Quarters 1997. Once again, the Company's
hotels recorded significant improvements in comparable operating results,
however, due to EITF 98-9, only minimum rent could be recorded . Specifically,
hotels in New York City, Boston, Toronto and Atlanta reported significant
improvements for the First Two Quarters 1998. Properties in Florida reported
some temporary declines in operating results due to exceptionally poor weather
in 1998.
 
                                      118

<PAGE>
 
  Minority Interest. Minority interest expense increased $4 million to $11
million for the First Two Quarters 1998, primarily reflecting improved lodging
results.
 
  Corporate Expenses. Corporate expenses increased $2 million to $20 million
for the First Two Quarters 1998 due to increased staffing levels and the
impact of inflation.
 
  Interest Expense. Interest expense decreased $5 million to $224 million in
the First Two Quarters 1998, primarily due to the impact of principal
amortization on the Company's mortgage debt.
 
  Interest Income. Interest income remain unchanged at $13 million for the
First Two Quarters 1998 and First Two Quarters 1997, respectively.
 
  Loss before Extraordinary Items. The loss before extraordinary items for the
First Two Quarters 1998 was $134 million, compared to $142 million for the
First Two Quarters 1997.
 
100% PARTICIPATION WITH NO NOTES ISSUED--1997 COMPARED TO 1996 (PRO FORMA)
 
  The following table presents the results of operations for the Company for
1997 and 1996 on a pro forma basis under the two pro forma scenarios:
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                           100% PARTICIPATION WITH   100% PARTICIPATION WITH
                               NO NOTES ISSUED            NOTES ISSUED
                           ------------------------  ------------------------
                                 FISCAL YEAR               FISCAL YEAR
                           ------------------------  ------------------------
                              1997         1996         1997         1996
                           -----------  -----------  -----------  -----------
                                            (IN MILLIONS)
<S>                        <C>          <C>          <C>          <C>
Rental revenues........... $     1,170  $     1,086  $     1,170  $     1,086
Total revenues............       1,171        1,080        1,171        1,080
Operating costs and
 expenses.................         650          639          648          637
Operating profit before
 minority interest,
 corporate expenses and
 interest expense.........         521          441          523          443
Minority interest.........         (10)          (9)         (10)          (9)
Corporate expenses........         (44)         (39)         (44)         (39)
Interest expense..........        (468)        (481)        (485)        (498)
Interest income...........          27           27           27           27
                           -----------  -----------  -----------  -----------
Income (loss) before
 income taxes.............          26          (61)          11          (76)
Benefit (provision) for
 income taxes.............          (1)           3           (1)           4
                           -----------  -----------  -----------  -----------
Income (loss) before
 extraordinary items...... $        25  $       (58) $        10  $       (72)
                           ===========  ===========  ===========  ===========
</TABLE>

 
  Revenues. Revenues increased $84 million, or 7.7%, to $1,170 million for
1997. The Company's revenue and operating profit were principally impacted by
improved lodging results for its hotel properties, which led to a substantial
increase in rental revenues. The 1997 results also included 52 weeks versus 53
weeks in 1996.
 
  Hotel sales increased $264 million, or 7.3%, to nearly $3.9 billion in 1997,
reflecting the increases in REVPAR. Improved results for the Company's full-
service hotels were driven by strong increases in REVPAR of 9.8% to $103.30 in
1997. Average room rates increased nearly 9%, while average occupancy
increased slightly to 77.7%.
 
                                      119

<PAGE>
 
  Operating Costs and Expenses. Operating costs and expenses increased $11
million to $650 million for 1997. As a percentage of rental revenues, hotel
operating costs and expenses decreased to 55% of rental revenues for 1997,
from 59% of rental revenues for 1996, reflecting the impact of increased 1997
rental revenues on relatively fixed operating costs and expenses.
 
  Operating Profit. As a result of the changes in rental revenues and
operating costs and expenses discussed above, the Company's operating profit
increased $80 million, or 18%, to $521 million in 1997. Hotel operating profit
increased $72 million, or 16%, to $531 million, or 45% of rental revenues, for
1997 compared to $459 million, or 42% of rental revenues, for 1996. In nearly
all markets, the Company's hotels recorded improvements in comparable
operating results. In particular, the Company's hotels in the Northeast, Mid-
Atlantic and Pacific coast regions benefited from the upscale and luxury full-
service room supply and demand imbalance. Hotels in New York City,
Philadelphia, San Francisco/Silicon Valley and in Southern California
performed particularly well. In 1998, the Company expects results to be strong
in these markets and other gateway cities in which the Company owns hotels. In
1997, the Company's suburban Atlanta properties (three properties totaling
1,022 rooms) generally reported decreased results due to higher activity in
1996 related to the Summer Olympics and the impact of the additional supply
added to the suburban areas. However, the majority of the Company's hotel
rooms in Atlanta are in the core business districts in downtown and Buckhead
where they realized strong year-over-year results and were only marginally
impacted by the additional supply.
 
  Minority Interest. Minority interest expense increased $1 million to $10
million in 1997.
 
  Corporate Expenses. Corporate expenses increased $5 million to $44 million
in 1997 due to increased staffing levels and the impact of inflation.
 
  Interest Expense. Interest expense decreased $13 million to $468 million in
1997, primarily due to the impact of principal amortization on the Company's
mortgage debt.
 
  Interest Income. Interest income remained unchanged at $27 million for 1997,
reflecting the interest income earned on the loan to the Non-Controlled
Subsidiary for its acquisition of furniture and equipment, the working capital
loan to Crestline, and a mortgage note on one property.
 
  Income (Loss) Before Extraordinary Items. Income before extraordinary items
for 1997 was $25 million, compared to a $58 million loss before extraordinary
items for 1996 as a result of the items discussed above.
 
100% PARTICIPATION WITH NOTES ISSUED--1997 COMPARED TO 1996 (PRO FORMA)
 
  Revenues. Revenues increased $84 million, or 7.7%, to $1,170 million for
1997. The Company's revenue and operating profit were principally impacted by
improved lodging results for the Company's hotel properties, which led to a
substantial increase in rental revenues. The 1997 results also included 52
weeks versus 53 weeks in 1996.
 
  Hotel sales increased $264 million, or 7.3%, to nearly $3.9 billion in 1997,
reflecting increases in REVPAR. Improved results for the Company's full-
service hotels were driven by strong increases in REVPAR of 9.8% to $103.30 in
1997. Average room rates increased nearly 9%, while average occupancy
increased slightly to 77.7%.
 
  Operating Costs and Expenses. Operating costs and expenses increased $11
million to $648 million for 1997. As a percentage of rental revenues, hotel
operating costs and expenses decreased to 54% of rental revenues for 1997,
from 58% of rental revenues for 1996, reflecting the impact of increased 1997
rental revenues on relatively fixed operating costs and expenses.
 
  Operating Profit. As a result of the changes in rental revenues and
operating costs and expenses discussed above, the Company's operating profit
increased $80 million, or 18%, to $523 million in 1997. Hotel operating
 
                                      120

<PAGE>
 
profit increased $73 million, or 16%, to $534 million, or 46% of rental
revenues, for 1997 compared to $461 million, or 42% of rental revenues, for
1996. In nearly all markets, the Company's hotels recorded improvements in
comparable operating results. In particular, the Company's hotels in the
Northeast, Mid-Atlantic and Pacific coast regions benefited from the upscale
and luxury full-service room supply and demand imbalance. Hotels in New York
City, Philadelphia, San Francisco/Silicon Valley and in Southern California
performed particularly well. In 1998, the Company expects results to be strong
in these markets and other gateway cities in which the Company owns hotels. In
1997, the Company's suburban Atlanta properties (three properties totaling
1,022 rooms) generally reported decreased results due to higher activity in
1996 related to the Summer Olympics and the impact of the additional supply
added to the suburban areas. However, the majority of the Company's hotel
rooms in Atlanta are in the core business districts in downtown and Buckhead
where they realized strong year-over-year results and were only marginally
impacted by the additional supply.
 
  Minority Interest. Minority interest increased $1 million to $10 million for
1997.
 
  Corporate Expenses. Corporate expenses increased $5 million to $44 million
in 1997 due to increased staffing levels and the impact of inflation.
 
  Interest Expense. Interest expense decreased $13 million to $485 million in
1997, reflecting the impact of principal amortization on the Company's
mortgage debt.
 
  Interest Income. Interest income remained unchanged at $27 million for 1997.
Interest income includes the interest income earned on the loan to the Non-
Controlled Subsidiary for its acquisition of furniture and equipment, the
working capital loan to Crestline, and a mortgage note on one property.
 
  Income (Loss) Before Extraordinary Items. Income before extraordinary items
for 1997 was $10 million, compared to a $72 million loss before extraordinary
items for 1996 as a result of the items discussed above.
 
LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
 
  Host funds its capital requirements with a combination of operating cash
flow, debt and equity financing and proceeds from sales of selected properties
and other assets. Host utilizes these sources of capital to acquire new
properties, fund capital additions and improvements, and make principal
payments on debt.
 
  Capital Transactions. Host has recently substantially changed its debt
financing through the following series of transactions which were intended to
facilitate the consummation of the REIT Conversion.
 
  On April 20, 1998, Host and certain of its subsidiaries filed a shelf
registration statement on Form S-3 (the "Shelf Registration") with the
Commission for $2.5 billion in securities, which may include debt, equity or
any combination thereof. Host anticipates that any net proceeds from the sale
of offered securities will be used for refinancing of Host's indebtedness, for
acquisitions and general corporate purposes.
 
  On August 5, 1998, HMH Properties, an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of
Host, which owns 61 of Host's hotels, purchased substantially all of its (i)
$600 million in 9 1/2% senior notes due 2005, (ii) $350 million in 9% senior
notes due 2007 and (iii) $600 million in 8 7/8% senior notes due 2007
(collectively, the "Old Senior Notes"). Concurrently with each offer to
purchase, HMH Properties solicited consents (the "1998 Consent Solicitations")
from registered holders of the Old Senior Notes to certain amendments to
eliminate or modify substantially all of the restrictive covenants and certain
other provisions contained in the indentures pursuant to which the Old Senior
Notes were issued. HMH Properties simultaneously utilized the Shelf
Registration to issue an aggregate of $1.7 billion in New Senior Notes. The
New Senior Notes were issued in two series, $500 million of 7 7/8% Series A
notes due in 2005 and $1.2 billion of 7 7/8% Series B notes due in 2008. The
1998 Consent Solicitations facilitated the merger of HMC Capital Resources
Holdings Corporation ("Capital Resources"), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Host,
with and into HMH Properties. Capital Resources, the owner of eight of Host's
hotel properties, was the obligor under the $500 million revolving credit
facility (the "Old Credit Facility").
 
                                      121

<PAGE>
 
The Operating Partnership will assume the New Senior Notes in connection with
the REIT Conversion and the guarantee of Host is expected to terminate on the
Effective Date.
 
  In conjunction with the issuance of the New Senior Notes, HMH Properties
entered into the $1.25 billion New Credit Facility with a group of commercial
banks. The New Credit Facility has an initial three-year term with two one-
year extension options. Borrowings under the New Credit Facility generally
bear interest at the Eurodollar rate plus 1.75%. The interest rate and
commitment fee (currently 0.35%) on the unused portion of the New Credit
Facility fluctuate based on certain financial ratios. The New Senior Notes and
the New Credit Facility are guaranteed by Host and its wholly-owned
subsidiary, Host Marriott Hospitality, Inc., and certain subsidiaries of HMH
Properties and are secured by pledges of equity interests in certain
subsidiaries of HMH Properties. The New Credit Facility will be assumed by the
Operating Partnership in connection with the REIT Conversion and the guarantee
of Host is expected to terminate on the Effective Date. As of September 28,
1998, approximately $350 million was outstanding under the New Credit
Facility.
 
  The New Credit Facility and the indenture under which the New Senior Notes
were issued contain covenants restricting the ability of HMH Properties and
certain of its subsidiaries to incur indebtedness, grant liens on their
assets, acquire or sell assets or make investments in other entities, and make
distributions to equityholders of HMH Properties, Host, and (following the
REIT Conversion) the Operating Partnership and Host REIT. The New Credit
Facility and the New Senior Notes also contain certain financial covenants
relating to, among other things, maintaining certain levels of tangible net
worth and certain ratios of EBITDA to interest and fixed charges, total debt
to EBITDA, unencumbered assets to unsecured debt, and secured debt to total
debt.
 
  The New Credit Facility replaces Host's Old Credit Facility. The net
proceeds from the offering and borrowings under the New Credit Facility were
used by Host to purchase substantially all of the Existing Senior Notes, to
repay amounts outstanding under the Existing Credit Facility and to make bond
premium and consent payments totaling $178 million. These costs, along with
the write-off of deferred financing fees of approximately $55 million related
to the Existing Senior Notes and the Existing Credit Facility, will be
recorded as a pre-tax extraordinary loss on the extinguishment of debt in the
third quarter of 1998.
 
  In June 1997, HMC Capital Resources Corporation ("Capital Resources"), a
wholly-owned subsidiary of Host, entered into the Old Credit Facility with a
group of commercial banks under which it may borrow up to $500 million for
certain permitted uses. As a result of this transaction, Host terminated its
line of credit with Marriott International.
 
  In July 1997, HMH Properties and HMC Acquisition Properties, Inc.
("Acquisitions"), indirect, wholly-owned subsidiaries of Host, completed
consent solicitations with holders of their senior notes (the "1997 Consent
Solicitations") to amend certain provisions of their senior notes indentures.
The 1997 Consent Solicitations facilitated the merger of Acquisitions with and
into HMH Properties (the "HMH Properties Merger"). The amendments to the
indentures also increased the ability of HMH Properties to acquire, through
certain subsidiaries, additional properties subject to non-recourse
indebtedness and controlling interests in corporations, partnerships and other
entities holding attractive properties and increased the threshold for
distributions to affiliates to the excess of HMH Properties' earnings before
interest expense, income taxes, depreciation and amortization and other non-
cash items subsequent to the 1997 Consent Solicitations over 220% of HMH
Properties' interest expense. HMH Properties paid dividends to Host of $54
million, $29 million and $36 million in 1997, 1996 and 1995, respectively, as
permitted under the indentures.
 
  Concurrent with the 1997 Consent Solicitations and the HMH Properties
Merger, HMH Properties issued an aggregate of $600 million of 8 7/8% senior
notes at par with a maturity of July 2007. HMH Properties received net
proceeds of approximately $570 million, net of the costs of the 1997 Consent
Solicitations and the offering.
 
  In addition to the capital resources provided by its new debt financings,
Host Marriott Financial Trust (the "Issuer"), a wholly-owned subsidiary trust
of Host, has outstanding 11 million shares of 6 3/4% convertible
 
                                      122

<PAGE>
 
quarterly income preferred securities (the "Convertible Preferred
Securities"), with a liquidation preference of $50 per share (for a total
liquidation amount of $550 million) issued in December 1996. The Convertible
Preferred Securities represent an undivided beneficial interest in the assets
of the Issuer and, pursuant to various agreements entered into in connection
with the transaction, are fully, irrevocably and unconditionally guaranteed by
Host. Proceeds from the issuance of the Convertible Preferred Securities were
invested in 6 3/4% Convertible Subordinated Debentures (the "Debentures") due
December 2, 2026 issued by Host. The Issuer exists solely to issue the
Convertible Preferred Securities and its own common securities (the "Common
Securities") and invest the proceeds therefrom in the Debentures, which are
its sole assets. Each of the Convertible Preferred Securities is convertible
at the option of the holder into shares of Host common stock at the rate of
2.6876 shares per Convertible Preferred Security (equivalent to a conversion
price of $18.604 per share of Host common stock). The Debentures are
convertible at the option of the holders into shares of Company common stock
at a conversion rate of 2.6876 shares for each $50 in principal amount of
Debentures. The conversion rate is subject to adjustments in certain events,
including (i) payment of dividends (and other distributions) on Host Common
Stock by Host in shares of Host Common Stock; (ii) distributions to all
holders of Host Common Stock of rights or warrants entitling such holders (for
a period not to exceed 45 days) to subscribe for or purchase Host Common Stock
at an exercise price less than the market price of Host Common Stock; (iii)
subdivisions and combinations of Host Common Stock; (iv) payment of dividends
(and other distributions) on Host Common Stock consisting of indebtedness of
Host, capital stock or other securities, assets or cash (other than certain
cash dividends at an annualized rate of up to 12.5% of the market price of
Host Common Stock); (v) payments for Host Common Stock by Host or any of its
subsidiaries in respect of a tender or exchange offer (other than an odd-lot
offer) at a price per share in excess of 110% of the market price of Host
Common Stock; (vi) consummation by Host of certain mergers, a consolidation, a
sale of all or substantially all of its assets, a recapitalization or certain
reclassifications of Host Common Stock. The distribution of the capital stock
of Crestline to all holders of Host REIT Common Stock would, and certain other
elements of the REIT Conversion (such as other distributions of Host's
accumulated earnings and profits) may, result in an adjustment to the
conversion price of the Debentures. The Issuer will only convert Debentures
pursuant to a notice of conversion by a holder of Convertible Preferred
Securities. During 1997 and 1996, no shares were converted into common stock.
Holders of the Convertible Preferred Securities are entitled to receive
preferential cumulative cash distributions at an annual rate of 6 3/4%
accruing from the original issue date, commencing March 1, 1997, and payable
quarterly in arrears thereafter. The distribution rate and the distribution
and other payment dates for the Convertible Preferred Securities will
correspond to the interest rate and interest and other payment dates on the
Debentures. Host may defer interest payments on the Debentures for a period
not to exceed 20 consecutive quarters. If interest payments on the Debentures
are deferred, so too are payments on the Convertible Preferred Securities.
Under this circumstance, Host will not be permitted to declare or pay any cash
distributions with respect to its capital stock or debt securities that rank
pari passu with or junior to the Debentures. Subject to certain restrictions,
the Convertible Preferred Securities are redeemable at the Issuer's option
upon any redemption by Host of the Debentures after December 2, 1999. Upon
repayment at maturity or as a result of the acceleration of the Debentures
upon the occurrence of a default, the Debentures shall be subject to mandatory
redemption, from which the proceeds will be applied to redeem Convertible
Preferred Securities and Common Securities, together with accrued and unpaid
distributions.
 
  In connection with consummation of the REIT Conversion, the Company will
assume primary liability for repayment of the convertible debentures of Host
underlying the Convertible Preferred Securities. Upon conversion by a
Convertible Preferred Securities holder, the Company will purchase Host REIT
Common Stock from Host REIT in exchange for a like number of OP Units and
distribute the Host REIT Common Stock to the Convertible Preferred Securities
holder.
 
  In March 1996, Host completed the issuance of 31.6 million shares of common
stock for net proceeds of nearly $400 million.
 
  In December 1995, Acquisitions issued $350 million of 9% senior notes (the
"Acquisitions Notes"). The Acquisitions Notes were issued at par and have a
final maturity of December 2007. The net proceeds totaled $340 million and
were utilized to repay in full the outstanding borrowings of $210 million
under Acquisitions'
 
                                      123

<PAGE>
 
$230 million revolving credit facility (the "Revolver"), which was then
terminated to acquire three full-service properties and to finance future
acquisitions of full-service hotel properties with the remaining proceeds.
 
  In May 1995, two wholly-owned subsidiaries of Host Marriott Hospitality,
Inc. ("Hospitality"), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Host, issued an aggregate
of $1 billion of 9.5% senior secured notes in two concurrent offerings. HMH
Properties, and Host Marriott Travel Plazas, Inc. ("HMTP"), the
operator/manager of HM Services' food, beverage and merchandise concessions
business, issued $600 million and $400 million, respectively, of senior notes.
The net proceeds of approximately $971 million were used to defease, and
subsequently redeem, all of Hospitality's remaining bonds and to repay
borrowings under the line of credit with Marriott International. The HMTP
senior notes were included in the HM Services' special dividend.
 
  During 1995, Host replaced its line of credit with a line of credit from
Marriott International pursuant to which Host had the right to borrow up to
$225 million. The line of credit with Marriott International was terminated as
a result of the Capital Resources transaction discussed above.
 
  Asset Dispositions. Host historically has sold, and may from time to time in
the future consider opportunities to sell, certain of its real estate
properties at attractive prices when the proceeds could be redeployed into
investments with more favorable returns. During the second quarter of 1998,
Host sold the 662-room New York Marriott East Side for proceeds of $191
million and recorded a pre-tax gain of approximately $40 million and the Napa
Valley Marriott for proceeds of $21 million and recorded a pre-tax gain of
approximately $10 million. During 1997, Host sold the 255-room Sheraton Elk
Grove Suites for proceeds of approximately $16 million. Host also sold 90% of
its 174-acre parcel of undeveloped land in Germantown, Maryland, for
approximately $11 million, which approximated its carrying value. During the
first and second quarters of 1996, 16 of Host's Courtyard properties and 18 of
Host's Residence Inn properties were sold (subject to a leaseback) to
Hospitality Properties Trust for approximately $314 million and Host will
receive approximately $35 million upon expiration of the leases. A gain on the
transactions of approximately $46 million was deferred and is being amortized
over the initial term of the leases. During the first and third quarters of
1995, 37 of Host's Courtyard properties were sold to and leased back from
Hospitality Properties Trust for approximately $330 million. Host received net
proceeds from the two 1995 transactions of approximately $297 million and will
receive approximately $33 million upon expiration of the leases. A deferred
gain of $14 million on the sale/leaseback transactions is being amortized over
the initial term of the leases. In 1995, Host also sold its four remaining
Fairfield Inns for net cash proceeds of approximately $6 million, which
approximated their carrying value.
 
  In cases where Host has made a decision to dispose of particular properties,
Host assesses impairment of each individual property to be sold on the basis
of expected sales price less estimated costs of disposal. Otherwise, Host
assesses impairment of its real estate properties based on whether it is
probable that undiscounted future cash flows from such properties will be less
than their net book value. If a property is impaired, its basis is adjusted to
its fair market value. In the second quarter of 1995, Host made a
determination that its owned Courtyard and Residence Inn properties were held
for sale and recorded a $10 million charge to write down the carrying value of
five individual Courtyard and Residence Inn properties to their estimated net
sales values.
 
  Capital Acquisitions, Additions and Improvements. Host seeks to grow
primarily through opportunistic acquisitions of full-service hotels. Host
believes that the upscale and luxury full-service hotel segments of the market
offer opportunities to acquire assets at attractive multiples of cash flow and
at discounts to replacement value, including under-performing hotels which can
be improved by conversion to the Marriott or Ritz-Carlton brands. During 1997,
Host acquired eight full-service hotels (3,600 rooms) and controlling
interests in nine additional full-service hotels (5,024 rooms) for an
aggregate purchase price of approximately $766 million (including the
assumption of approximately $418 million of debt). Host also completed the
acquisition of the 504-room New York Marriott Financial Center, after
acquiring the mortgage on the hotel for $101 million in late 1996. During
1996, Host acquired six full-service hotels (1,964 rooms) for an aggregate
purchase price of $189 million and controlling interests in 17 additional
full-service properties (8,917 rooms) for an aggregate
 
                                      124

<PAGE>
 
purchase price of approximately $1.1 billion (including the assumption of $696
million of debt). During 1995, Host acquired nine hotels totaling
approximately 3,900 rooms in separate transactions for approximately $390
million ($141 million of which was financed through first mortgage financing
on four of the hotels).
 
  In the first quarter of 1998, Host acquired a controlling interest in the
partnership that owns the 1,671-room Atlanta Marriott Marquis Hotel for $239
million, including the assumption of $164 million of mortgage debt. Host also
acquired a controlling interest in the partnership that owns the 359-room
Albany Marriott, the 350-room San Diego Marriott Mission Valley and the 320-
room Minneapolis Marriott Southwest for approximately $50 million. In the
second quarter of 1998, Host acquired the 289-room Park Ridge Marriott for $24
million and acquired the 281-room Ritz-Carlton, Phoenix for $75 million. Host
is continually engaged in discussions with respect to other potential
acquisition properties. In addition, Host acquired the 397-room Ritz-Carlton,
Tysons Corner, Virginia and the 487-room Torrance Marriott near Los Angeles,
California. In the third quarter of 1998, Host acquired the 308-room Ritz-
Carlton, Dearborn for approximately $65 million, the 336-room Ritz-Carlton,
San Francisco for approximately $161 million and the 404-room Memphis Marriott
(which was converted to the Marriott brand upon acquisition) for approximately
$16 million.
 
  On April 17, 1998, Host announced that it had reached a definitive agreement
with the Blackstone Entities to acquire interests in twelve world-class luxury
hotels and certain other assets. If the Blackstone Acquisition is consummated,
the Operating Partnership expects to pay approximately $862 million in cash
and assumed debt and to issue approximately 43.7 million OP Units (based upon
a negotiated value of $20.00 per OP Unit) and other consideration. The
Blackstone portfolio consists of two Ritz-Carltons, two Four Seasons, one
Grand Hyatt, three Hyatt Regencies and four Swissotel properties and the
mortgage on a third Four Seasons. These hotels are located in major urban and
convention/resort markets with significant barriers to new competition. The
Blackstone Acquisition is expected to close as part of, and is contingent
upon, the REIT Conversion. At that time, the Blackstone hotels and other
assets will be acquired by the Company. The hotels will be leased to Lessees
and will be managed on behalf of the Lessees under their existing management
contracts.
 
  Under the terms of its hotel management agreements, Host is generally
required to spend approximately 5% of gross hotel sales to cover the capital
needs of the properties, including major guest room and common area
renovations which occur every five to six years.
 
  Host completed the construction of the 1,200-room Philadelphia Marriott,
which opened on January 27, 1995. The construction costs of this hotel were
funded 60% through a loan from Marriott International which was repaid in the
fourth quarter of 1996. In March 1997, Host obtained a $90 million mortgage
which bears interest at a fixed rate of 8.49% and matures in 2009.
Construction of a second hotel in Philadelphia, the 419-room Philadelphia
Airport Marriott (the "Airport Hotel"), was completed and opened on November
1, 1995. The Airport Hotel was financed principally with $40 million of
proceeds from an industrial development bond financing. Host also completed
construction of a 300-room Residence Inn in Arlington, Virginia, which opened
in March 1996. Capital expenditures for these three hotels totaled $11 million
in 1996 and $64 million in 1995.
 
  In November 1997, Host announced that it had committed to develop and
construct the 717-room Tampa Convention Center Marriott for a cost estimated
at approximately $88 million, net of an approximate $16 million subsidy
provided by the City of Tampa.
 
  Host may also expand certain existing hotel properties where strong
performance and market demand exists. Expansions to existing properties
creates a lower risk to Host as the success of the market is generally known
and development time is significantly shorter than new construction. Host
recently committed to add approximately 500 rooms and an additional 15,000
square feet of meeting space to the 1,503-room Marriott's Orlando World
Center.
 
  In 1997, Host acquired the outstanding common stock of the Forum Group from
Marriott Senior Living Services, Inc. ("MSLS"), a subsidiary of Marriott
International. Host purchased the Forum Group portfolio of 29 senior living
communities for approximately $460 million, including approximately $270
million in debt. The properties will continue to be operated by MSLS. In
addition, Host plans to add approximately 1,060 units to
 
                                      125

<PAGE>
 
these communities for approximately $107 million through an expansion plan
which will be completed in 1999. In 1997, approximately $56 million (549
units) of the expansion plan had been completed (including $33 million of debt
financing provided by Marriott International). Host also acquired 49% of the
remaining 50% interest in the venture which owned the 418-unit Leisure Park
senior living community from Marriott International (which will own the Forum
Group portfolio and other senior living and assisted living communities
described above) for approximately $23 million, including approximately $15
million of debt.
 
  During the first quarter of 1998, Host acquired the Gables at Winchester in
suburban Boston, a 124-unit senior living community, for $21 million and
entered into conditional purchase agreements to acquire two Marriott Brighton
Gardens assisted living communities from the Summit Companies of Denver,
Colorado. After the anticipated completion of construction in the first
quarter of 1999, Host may acquire these two 160-unit properties located in
Denver and Colorado Springs, Colorado, for $35 million, if they achieve
certain operating performance criteria. All three of these communities will be
operated by MSLS under long-term operating agreements.
 
  Under the terms of its senior living communities' management agreements,
Host is generally required to spend an amount of gross revenues to cover
certain routine repairs and maintenance and replacements and renewals to the
communities' property and improvements. The amount Host is required to spend
will be 2.65% through fiscal year 2002, 2.85% for fiscal years 2003 through
2007, and 3.5% thereafter. Host anticipates spending approximately $6 million
in 1998.
 
  As part of the Initial E&P Distribution, Host REIT and the Operating
Partnership will distribute shares of Crestline (which will own the Forum
Group portfolio and other senior living and assisted living communities
described above) to Host REIT's stockholders and the Blackstone Entities.
 
  Debt Payments. At January 2, 1998, Host and its subsidiaries had $1,585
million of senior notes, approximately $82.0 billion of non-recourse mortgage
debt secured by real estate assets and approximately $219 million of unsecured
and other debt.
 
  Scheduled maturities over the next five years were $942 million as of
January 2, 1998, a significant portion of which represents the maturity of the
mortgage on the New York Marriott Marquis of approximately $270 million in
December 1998. Management anticipates that the mortgage will be refinanced by
the end of 1998 on comparable terms. Host's interest coverage, defined as
EBITDA divided by cash interest expense, improved to nearly 2.5 times in 1997
from 2.0 times in 1996.
 
  At January 2, 1998, Host was party to an interest rate exchange agreement
with a financial institution (the contracting party) with an aggregate
notional amount of $100 million. Under this agreement, Host collects interest
based on specified floating interest rates of one month LIBOR (rate of 6% at
January 2, 1998) and pays interest at fixed rates (rate of 7.99% at January 2,
1998). This agreement expires in 1998, in conjunction with the maturity of the
mortgage on the New York Marriott Marquis. Also in 1997, Host was party to two
additional interest rate swap agreements with an aggregate notional amount of
$400 million. These agreements expired in May 1997. Host realized a net
reduction of interest expense of $1 million in 1997, $6 million in 1996 and $5
million in 1995 related to interest rate exchange agreements. Host monitors
the creditworthiness of its contracting parties by evaluating credit exposure
and referring to the ratings of widely accepted credit rating services. The
Standard and Poors' long-term debt ratings for the contracting party is A- for
its sole outstanding interest rate exchange agreement. Host is exposed to
credit loss in the event of non-performance by the contracting party to the
interest rate swap agreement; however, Host does not anticipate non-
performance by the contracting party.
 
  Cash Flows. Host's cash flow from continuing operations in 1997, 1996 and
1995 totaled $464 million, $205 million and $110 million, respectively. Cash
flow from operations in the First Two Quarters 1998 and First Two Quarters
1997 totaled $206 million and $193 million, respectively. Cash flow from
operations increased principally due to improved lodging results and the
significant acquisitions of hotels.
 
                                      126

<PAGE>
 
  Host's cash used in investing activities from continuing operations in 1997,
1996 and 1995 totaled $1,046 million, $504 million and $156 million,
respectively. Cash used in investing activities was $49 million and $200
million for the First Two Quarters 1998 and the First Two Quarters 1997,
respectively. Cash from investing activities primarily consists of net
proceeds from the sales of certain assets, offset by the acquisition of hotels
and other capital expenditures previously discussed, as well as the purchases
and sales of short-term marketable securities. Cash used in investing
activities was significantly impacted by the purchase of $354 million of
short-term marketable securities in 1997 and the net sale of $308 million of
short-term marketable securities in the First Two Quarters 1998.
 
  Host's cash from financing activities from continuing operations was $389
million for 1997, $806 million for 1996 and $204 million for 1995. Cash used
in financing activities was $213 million and $188 million, respectively, for
the First Two Quarters 1998 and First Two Quarters 1997. Host's cash from
financing activities primarily consists of the proceeds from debt and equity
offerings, the issuance of the Convertible Preferred Securities, mortgage
financing on certain acquired hotels and borrowings under the Line of Credit,
offset by redemptions and payments on senior notes, prepayments on certain
hotel mortgages and other scheduled principal payments.
 
  The ratio of earnings to fixed charges was 2.0 to 1.0, 1.5 to 1.0, 1.3 to
1.0, 1.0 to 1.0 and .7 to 1.0 for the First Two Quarters 1998, the First Two
Quarters 1997, 1997, 1996 and 1995, respectively. The deficiency of earnings
to fixed charges of $70 million for 1995 is largely the result of depreciation
and amortization of $122 million. In addition, the deficiency for 1995 was
impacted by the $60 million pre-tax charge to write down the carrying value of
one undeveloped land parcel to its estimated sales value.
 
  Comparative FFO. Host believes that Comparative Funds From Operations
("Comparative FFO," which represents Funds From Operations, as defined by
NAREIT, plus deferred tax expense) is a meaningful disclosure that will help
the investment community to better understand the financial performance of
Host, including enabling its stockholders and analysts to more easily compare
Host's performance to REITs. FFO is defined by NAREIT as net income computed
in accordance with GAAP, excluding gains or losses from debt restructurings
and sales of properties, plus real estate related depreciation and
amortization, and after adjustments for unconsolidated partnerships and joint
ventures. FFO should not be considered as an alternative to net income,
operating profit, cash flows from operations or any other operating or
liquidity performance measure prescribed by GAAP. FFO is also not an indicator
of funds available to fund Host's cash needs, including its ability to make
distributions. Host's method of calculating FFO may be different from methods
used by other REITs and, accordingly, is not comparable to such other REITs.
Comparative FFO increased $61 million, or 42%, to $206 million in the First
Two Quarters 1998. Comparative FFO increased $131 million, or 80%, to $295
million in 1997. The following is a reconciliation of Host's income (loss)
before extraordinary items to Comparative FFO (in millions):
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                      FIRST
                                                  TWO QUARTERS   FISCAL YEAR
                                                  -------------- ------------
                                                   1998    1997  1997   1996
                                                  ------  ------ -----  -----
   <S>                                            <C>     <C>    <C>    <C>
   Income (loss) before extraordinary items...... $   96  $   32 $  47  $ (13)
   Real estate related depreciation and
    amortization.................................    125     101   240    168
   Other real estate activities..................    (52)      2     6      7
   Partnership adjustments.......................     (8)    --    (13)     1
   REIT Conversion expenses......................      6     --    --     --
   Deferred taxes................................     39      10    15      1
                                                  ------  ------ -----  -----
   Comparative FFO............................... $  206  $  145 $ 295  $ 164
                                                  ======  ====== =====  =====
</TABLE>

 
  Host considers Comparative FFO to be an indicative measure of Host's
operating performance due to the significance of Host's long-lived assets and
because such data is considered useful by the investment community to better
understand Host's results, and can be used to measure Host's ability to
service debt, fund capital
 
                                      127

<PAGE>
 
expenditures and expand its business; however, such information should not be
considered as an alternative to net income, operating profit, cash from
operations or any other operating or liquidity performance measure prescribed
by generally accepted accounting principles. Cash expenditures for various
long-term assets and income taxes have been, and will be, incurred which are
not reflected in the Comparative FFO presentation.
 
  Partnership Activities. Host has general and limited partner interests in
numerous limited partnerships which own 240 hotels (including 20 full-service
hotels) as of the date hereof, managed by Marriott International. Debt of the
hotel limited partnerships is typically secured by first mortgages on the
properties and is generally nonrecourse to the partnership and the partners.
However, Host has committed to advance amounts to certain affiliated limited
partnerships, if necessary, to cover certain future debt service requirements.
Such commitments were limited, in the aggregate, to an additional $60 million
at January 2, 1998. Subsequent to year-end, this amount was reduced to $20
million in connection with the refinancing and acquisition of a controlling
interest in the partnership which owns the Atlanta Marriott Marquis. Amounts
repaid to the Company under these guarantees totaled $2 million and $13
million in 1997 and 1996, respectively. Fundings by Host under these
guarantees amounted to $10 million in 1997 and $8 million for 1995.
 
  Leases. Host leases certain property and equipment under noncancelable
operating leases, including the long-term ground leases for certain hotels,
generally with multiple renewal options. The leases related to the 53
Courtyard properties and 18 Residence Inn properties sold during 1995 and 1996
are nonrecourse to Host and contain provisions for the payment of contingent
rentals based on a percentage of sales in excess of stipulated amounts. Host
remains contingently liable on certain leases related to divested non-lodging
properties. Such contingent liabilities aggregated $110 million at January 2,
1998. However, management considers the likelihood of any substantial funding
related to these divested properties' leases to be remote.
 
  Inflation. Host's hotel lodging properties are impacted by inflation through
its effect on increasing costs and on the managers' ability to increase room
rates. Unlike other real estate, hotels have the ability to change room rates
on a daily basis, so the impact of higher inflation generally can be passed on
to customers.
 
  A substantial portion of Host's debt bears interest at fixed rates. This
debt structure largely mitigates the impact of changes in the rate of
inflation on future interest costs. However, Host currently is exposed to
variable interest rates through an interest rate exchange agreement with a
financial institution with an aggregate notional amount of $100 million. Under
this agreement, Host collects interest based on the specified floating rates
of one month LIBOR (rate of 6% at January 2, 1998) and pays interest at fixed
rates (rate of 7.99% at January 2, 1998). This agreement expires in 1998 in
conjunction with the maturity of the mortgage on the New York Marriott
Marquis. Host's Line of Credit and the mortgage on the San Diego Marriott
Hotel and Marina ($199 million at January 2, 1998) bears interest based on
variable rates. Accordingly, the amount of Host's interest expense under the
interest rate swap agreements and the floating rate debt for a particular year
will be affected by changes in short-term interest rates.
 
  Year 2000 Issues. Over the last few years, Host has invested in implementing
new accounting systems which are Year 2000 compliant. Accordingly, Host
believes that future costs associated with Year 2000 issues will be minimal
and not material to Host's consolidated financial statements.
 
  However, Host does rely upon accounting software used by the managers and
operators of its properties to obtain financial information. Management
believes that the managers and operators have begun to implement changes to
the property specific software to ensure that software will function properly
in the Year 2000 and does not expect to incur significant costs related to
these modifications.
 
  Accounting Standards. Host adopted Statements of Financial Accounting
Standards ("SFAS") No. 114, "Accounting by Creditors for Impairment of a Loan"
and SFAS No. 121, "Accounting for the Impairment of Long-Lived Assets and for
Long-Lived Assets to be Disposed Of" during 1995. Adoption of these statements
did not have a material effect on Host's continuing operations. See the
discussion below for a discussion of the impact of the adoption of SFAS No.
121 on discontinued operations.
 
                                      128

<PAGE>
 
  SFAS No. 121 requires that an impairment loss be recognized when the
carrying amount of an asset exceeds the sum of the undiscounted estimated
future cash flows associated with the asset. Under SFAS No. 121, Host reviewed
the impairment of its assets employed in its operating group business lines
(airport, toll plaza and sports and entertainment) on an individual operating
unit basis. For each individual operating unit determined to be impaired, an
impairment loss equal to the difference between the carrying value and the
fair market value of the unit's assets was recognized. Fair market value was
estimated to be the present value of expected future cash flows of the
individual operating unit, as determined by management, after considering such
factors as future air travel and toll-pay vehicle data and inflation. As a
result of the adoption of SFAS No. 121, Host recognized a non-cash, pre-tax
charge against earnings during the fourth quarter 1995 of $47 million, which
was reflected in discontinued operations.
 
  In the fourth quarter of 1996, Host adopted SFAS No. 123, "Accounting for
Stock Based Compensation." The adoption of SFAS No. 123 did not have a
material effect on Host's financial statements.
 
  During 1997, Host adopted SFAS No. 128, "Earnings Per Share," SFAS No. 129,
"Disclosure of Information About Capital Structure" and SFAS No. 131,
"Disclosures About Segments of an Enterprise and Related Information." The
adoption of these statements did not have a material effect on Host's
consolidated financial statements and the appropriate disclosures required by
these statements have been incorporated herein.
 
  In the First Quarter 1998, Host adopted SFAS No. 130, "Reporting
Comprehensive Income." SFAS No. 130 establishes standards for reporting and
display of comprehensive income and its components in financial statements.
The objective of SFAS No. 130 is to report a measure of all changes in equity
of an enterprise that result from transactions and other economic events of
the period other than transactions with owners. Comprehensive income is the
total of net income and all other nonowner changes in equity.
 
  Host's only component of other comprehensive income is the right to receive
up to 1.4 million shares of Host Marriott Services Corporation's common stock
or an equivalent cash value subsequent to exercise of the options held by
certain former and current employees of Marriott International. For the First
Two Quarters 1998 and First Two Quarters 1997, Host's other comprehensive
income was $1 million and $3 million, respectively. As of June 19, 1998 and
January 2, 1998, Host's accumulated other comprehensive income was
approximately $11 million and $10 million, respectively.
 
  On November 20, 1997, the Emerging Issues Task Force ("EITF") of the
Financial Accounting Standards Board reached a consensus of EITF 97-2,
"Application of FASB Statement No. 94 and APB Opinion No. 16 to Physician
Practice Management Entities and Certain Other Entities with Contractual
Management Arrangements." EITF 97-2 addresses the circumstances in which a
management entity may include the revenues and expenses of a managed entity in
its financial statements.
 
  Host has considered the impact of EITF 97-2 on its financial statements and
has determined that EITF 97-2 requires the Company to include property-level
sales and operating expenses of its hotels and senior living communities in
its statements of operations. Host will adopt EITF 97-2 in the fourth quarter
of 1998, with retroactive effect in prior periods to conform to the new
presentation. Application of EITF 97-2 to the consolidated financial
statements for the First Two Quarters 1998, First Two Quarters 1997 and Fiscal
Years 1997, 1996 and 1995 would have increased both revenues and operating
expenses by approximately $993 million, $745 million, $1,713 million, $1,225
million and $877 million, respectively, and would have had no impact on
operating profit, net income or earnings per share.
 
  EITF 98-9, "Accounting for Contingent Rent in Interim Financial Periods,"
was issued on May 21, 1998. EIFT 98-9 requires a lessor to defer recognition
of contingent rental income in interim periods until the specified target that
triggers the contingent rental income is achieved. EITF 98-9 has no impact on
Host prior to the REIT Conversion, but will impact the quarterly revenue
recognized under the Leases.
 
                                      129

<PAGE>
 
                                  MANAGEMENT
 
DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND KEY EMPLOYEES OF HOST REIT
 
  The following table sets forth certain information with respect to persons
who will be Directors immediately after the completion of the Merger and the
other transactions comprising the REIT Conversion, and the executive officers
of Host REIT (or the Operating Partnership), all of whom are currently
directors, executive officers or key employees of Host.
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
          NAME            AGE POSITION WITH HOST REIT (OR THE OPERATING PARTNERSHIP)
          ----            --- ------------------------------------------------------
<S>                       <C> <C>
Richard E. Marriott(1)..   59 Chairman of the Board of Directors
J.W. Marriott, Jr.(1)...   66 Director
R. Theodore Ammon.......   48 Director
Robert M. Baylis........   59 Director
Ann Dore McLaughlin.....   56 Director
Harry L. Vincent, Jr....   78 Director
John G. Schreiber.......   51 Director
Terence C. Golden.......   53 Director, President and Chief Executive Officer
Robert E. Parsons,
 Jr. ...................   42 Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Christopher J.
 Nassetta...............   35 Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer
Christopher G.
 Townsend...............   50 Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary
Donald D. Olinger.......   39 Senior Vice President and Corporate Controller
</TABLE>

- --------
(1) Richard E. Marriott and J.W. Marriott, Jr. are brothers.
 
  The following is a biographical summary of the experience of the persons who
will be Directors and executive officers of Host REIT after the REIT
Conversion:
 
  Richard E. Marriott. Mr. Richard E. Marriott has been a Director of Host
since 1979 and is a Director of Marriott International, Inc., Host Marriott
Services Corporation, Potomac Electric Power Company and the Polynesian
Cultural Center, and he is Chairman of the Board of First Media Corporation.
He also serves as a Director of certain subsidiaries of Host and is a past
President of the National Restaurant Association. In addition, Mr. Marriott is
the President and a Trustee of the Marriott Foundation for People with
Disabilities. Mr. Marriott's term as a Director of Host REIT will commence at
or prior to the REIT Conversion and will expire at the 2001 annual meeting of
stockholders. Mr. Marriott joined Host in 1965 and has served in various
executive capacities. In 1984, he was elected Executive Vice President, and in
1986, he was elected Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors. In 1993, Mr.
Marriott was elected Chairman of the Board. Mr. Marriott also has been
responsible for management of Host's government affairs functions.
 
  J.W. Marriott, Jr. Mr. J.W. Marriott, Jr. has been a Director of Host since
1964 and is Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of Marriott
International, Inc., and a Director of Host Marriott Services Corporation,
General Motors Corporation and the U.S.-Russia Business Council. He also
serves on the Boards of Trustees of the Mayo Foundation, Georgetown University
and the National Geographic Society. He is on the President's Advisory
Committee of the American Red Cross, the Executive Committee of the World
Travel & Tourism Council and is a member of the Business Council and the
Business Roundtable. Mr. Marriott's term as a Director of Host REIT will
commence at or prior to the REIT Conversion and will expire at the 1999 annual
meeting of stockholders.
 
  R. Theodore Ammon. Mr. Ammon has been a Director of Host since 1992 and is a
private investor and Chairman of Big Flower Holdings, Inc. He was formerly a
General Partner of Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Company (a New York and San
Francisco-based investment firm) from 1990 to 1992, and was an executive of
such firm prior to 1990. Mr. Ammon is also a member of the Board of Directors
of Samsonite Corporation and Culligan Water Technologies, Inc. In addition, he
serves on the Board of Directors of the New York YMCA, Jazz @ Lincoln Center
and the Institute of International Education and on the Board of Directors of
Bucknell
 
                                      130

<PAGE>
 
University. Mr. Ammon's term as a Director of Host REIT will commence at or
prior to the REIT Conversion and will expire at the 2001 annual meeting of
stockholders.
 
  Robert M. Baylis. Mr. Baylis has been a Director of Host since 1996 and is a
Director of The International Forum, an executive education program of the
Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He was formerly Vice
Chairman of CS First Boston. Mr. Baylis also serves as a Director of New York
Life Insurance Company, Covance, Inc. and Gryphon Holdings, Inc. In addition,
he is an overseer of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archeology and
Anthropology. Mr. Baylis's term as a Director of Host REIT will commence at or
prior to the REIT Conversion and will expire at the 2000 annual meeting of
stockholders.
 
  Ann Dore McLaughlin. Ms. McLaughlin has been a Director of Host since 1993
and currently is Chairman of the Aspen Institute. She formerly served as
President of the Federal City Council from 1990 until 1995. Ms. McLaughlin has
served with distinction in several U.S. Administrations in such positions as
Secretary of Labor and Under Secretary of the Department of the Interior. She
also serves as a Director of AMR Corporation, Fannie Mae, General Motors
Corporation, Kellogg Company, Nordstrom, Potomac Electric Power Company, Union
Camp Corporation, Donna Karan International, Inc., Vulcan Materials Company,
Harman International Industries, Inc. and Sedgwick Group plc. Ms. McLaughlin's
term as a Director of Host REIT will commence at or prior to the REIT
Conversion and will expire at the 2000 annual meeting of stockholders.
 
  Harry L. Vincent, Jr. Mr. Vincent has been a Director of Host since 1969 and
is a retired Vice Chairman of Booz-Allen & Hamilton, Inc. He also served as a
Director of Signet Banking Corporation from 1973 until 1989. Mr. Vincent's
term as a Director of Host REIT will commence at or prior to the REIT
Conversion and will expire at the 1999 annual meeting of stockholders.
 
  John G. Schreiber. Mr. Schreiber has been a Director of Host since 1998 and
is President of Schreiber Investments, Inc. and a Senior Advisor and Partner
of Blackstone Real Estate Advisors, L.P. Mr. Schreiber serves as a Trustee of
AMLI Residential Properties Trust and as a Director of Urban Shopping Centers,
Inc., JMB Realty Corporation and a number of mutual funds advised by T. Rowe
Price Associates, Inc. Prior to his retirement as an officer of JMB Realty
Corporation in 1990, Mr. Schreiber was Chairman and CEO of JMB/Urban
Development Company and an Executive Vice President of JMB Realty Corporation.
Mr. Schreiber's term as a Director of Host REIT will commence at or prior to
the REIT Conversion and will expire at the 1999 annual meeting of
stockholders.
 
  Terence C. Golden. Mr. Golden has been a Director of Host since 1995 and was
named President and Chief Executive Officer of Host in 1995. Mr. Golden also
serves as a Director of certain subsidiaries of Host. He also serves as
Chairman of Bailey Realty Corporation and Bailey Capital Corporation and
various affiliated companies. In addition, Mr. Golden is Chairman of the
Washington Convention Center and a Director of Prime Retail, Inc., Cousins
Properties, Inc., The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation and the District
of Columbia Early Childhood Collaborative. He is also a member of the
Executive Committee of the Federal City Council. Mr. Golden will be President
and Chief Executive Officer of Host REIT commencing at or prior to the REIT
Conversion and his term as a Director of Host REIT will commence at or prior
to the REIT Conversion and will expire at the 2000 annual meeting of
stockholders. Prior to joining Host, Mr. Golden was Chairman of Bailey Realty
Corporation and prior to that had served as Chief Financial Officer of The
Oliver Carr Company. Before joining The Oliver Carr Company, he served as
Administrator of the General Services Administration and as Assistant
Secretary of Treasury, and he was co-founder and national managing partner of
Trammel Crow Residential Companies.
 
  Robert E. Parsons, Jr. Mr. Parsons joined Host's Corporate Financial
Planning staff in 1981 and was made Assistant Treasurer in 1988. In 1993, Mr.
Parsons was elected Senior Vice President and Treasurer of Host, and in 1995,
he was elected Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Host.
Since September 1998, Mr. Parsons has been President and an initial Director
of Host REIT but he will resign from such positions upon or prior to the REIT
Conversion. Mr. Parsons will be Executive Vice President and Chief Financial
Officer of Host REIT commencing at or prior to the REIT Conversion.
 
                                      131

<PAGE>
 
  Christopher J. Nassetta. Mr. Nassetta joined Host in October 1995 as
Executive Vice President and was elected Chief Operating Officer of Host in
1997. Mr. Nassetta will be Executive Vice President and Chief Operating
Officer of Host REIT commencing at or prior to the REIT conversion. Prior to
joining Host, Mr. Nassetta served as President of Bailey Realty Corporation
from 1991 until 1995. He had previously served as Chief Development Officer
and in various other positions with The Oliver Carr Company from 1984 through
1991.
 
  Christopher G. Townsend. Mr. Townsend joined Host's Law Department in 1982
as a Senior Attorney. In 1984, Mr. Townsend was made Assistant Secretary of
Host, and in 1986, he was made Assistant General Counsel. In 1993, Mr.
Townsend was elected Senior Vice President, Corporate Secretary and Deputy
General Counsel. In January 1997, he was elected General Counsel. Since
September 1998, Mr. Townsend has been Vice President and an initial Director
of Host REIT but he will resign from such positions upon or prior to the REIT
Conversion. Mr. Townsend will be Senior Vice President, General Counsel and
Secretary of Host REIT commencing at or prior to the REIT Conversion.
 
  Donald D. Olinger. Mr. Olinger joined Host in 1993 as Director--Corporate
Accounting. Later in 1993, Mr. Olinger was promoted to Senior Director and
Assistant Controller. He was promoted to Vice President--Corporate Accounting
in 1995. In 1996, he was elected Senior Vice President and Corporate
Controller. Since September 1998, Mr. Olinger has been Vice President of Host
REIT but he will resign from such position at or prior to the REIT Conversion.
Mr. Olinger will be Senior Vice President and Corporate Controller of Host
REIT commencing at or prior to the REIT Conversion. Prior to joining Host, Mr.
Olinger was with the public accounting firm of Deloitte & Touche.
 
COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS
 
  Promptly following the consummation of the REIT Conversion, the Board of
Directors of Host REIT will establish the following committees:
 
  Audit Committee. The Audit Committee will be comprised of five Directors who
are not employees of Host REIT, namely, R. Theodore Ammon (Chair), Harry L.
Vincent, Jr., Ann Dore McLaughlin, John G. Schreiber and Robert M. Baylis. The
Audit Committee will meet at least three times a year with the independent
auditors, management representatives and internal auditors; recommend to the
Board of Directors appointment of independent auditors; approve the scope of
audits and other services to be performed by the independent and internal
auditors; consider whether the performance of any professional service by the
auditors other than services provided in connection with the audit function
could impair the independence of the outside auditors; and review the results
of internal and external audits, the accounting principles applied in
financial reporting, and financial and operational controls.
 
  Compensation Policy Committee. The Compensation Policy Committee will be
comprised of six Directors who are not employees of Host REIT, namely, Harry
L. Vincent, Jr. (Chair), R. Theodore Ammon, John G. Schreiber, Robert M.
Baylis, J.W. Marriott, Jr. and Ann Dore McLaughlin. The Compensation Policy
Committee's functions will include recommendations on policies and procedures
relating to senior officers' compensation and various employee stock plans,
and approval of individual salary adjustments and stock awards in those areas.
 
  Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee. The Nominating and Corporate
Governance Committee will be comprised of six Directors who are not employees
of Host REIT, namely, Ann Dore McLaughlin (Chair), Harry L. Vincent, Jr., John
G. Schreiber, R. Theodore Ammon, J.W. Marriott, Jr. and Robert M. Baylis. It
will consider candidates for election as Directors and will be responsible for
keeping abreast of and making recommendations with regard to corporate
governance in general. In addition, the Nominating and Corporate Governance
Committee will fulfill an advisory function with respect to a range of matters
affecting the Board of Directors and its Committees, including the making of
recommendations with respect to qualifications of Director candidates,
compensation of Directors, the selection of committee chairs, committee
assignments and related matters affecting the functioning of the Board.
 
                                      132

<PAGE>
 
  Host REIT may from time to time form other committees as circumstances
warrant. Such committees will have authority and responsibility as delegated
by the Board of Directors.
 
COMPENSATION OF DIRECTORS
 
  Directors who are also officers of Host REIT will receive no additional
compensation for their services as Directors. Directors elected by the holders
of Host REIT Common Stock and who are not officers will receive an annual
retainer fee of $25,000 as well as an attendance fee of $1,250 for each
stockholders' meeting, meeting of the Board of Directors or meeting of a
committee of the Board of Directors, regardless of the number of meetings held
on a given day. The chair of each committee of the Board of Directors will
receive an additional annual retainer fee of $1,000, except for the chair of
the Compensation Policy Committee, Mr. Vincent, who will receive an annual
retainer fee of $6,000. (The higher annual retainer fee paid to the chair of
the Compensation Policy Committee relates to his additional duties which
include, among other things, the annual performance appraisal of the chief
executive officer on behalf of the Board, although the final appraisal is
determined by the Board.) Any individual Director receiving these fees may
elect to defer payment of all such fees or any portion thereof pursuant to
Host REIT's Executive Deferred Compensation Plan and/or Host REIT's Non-
Employee Directors' Deferred Stock Compensation Plan. Directors also will be
reimbursed for travel expenses and other out-of-pocket costs incurred in
attending meetings or in visiting hotels or other properties controlled by
Host REIT or by Marriott International.
 
  In 1997, the following Directors of the Company received special one-time
awards of Company common stock in the amounts indicated: Mr. Ammon, 4,000
shares; Mr. Baylis, 7,000 shares; Ms. McLaughlin, 7,000 shares and Mr.
Vincent, 7,000 shares. The special one-time awards of Company common stock
vest at the rate of 10% per year of a Directors service on the Board, with
credit given for each year of service already completed, and will also become
fully vested upon the death or disability of the Directors.
 
EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
 
  The table below sets forth a summary of the compensation paid by Host for
the last three fiscal years to the Chief Executive Officer and the four
additional most highly compensated executive officers of Host for Host's
fiscal year 1997 (the "Named Executive Officers").
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                           LONG-TERM
                                                                          COMPENSATION
                                                                      --------------------
                                        ANNUAL COMPENSATION              AWARDS    PAYOUTS
                                 ----------------------------------   ------------ -------
                                                                       RESTRICTED
NAME AND                  FISCAL                       OTHER ANNUAL      STOCK      LTIP      ALL OTHER
PRINCIPAL POSITION         YEAR  SALARY(1)(2) BONUS(3) COMPENSATION   AWARDS(4)(5) PAYOUTS COMPENSATION(6)
- ------------------        ------ ------------ -------- ------------   ------------ ------- ---------------
<S>                       <C>    <C>          <C>      <C>            <C>          <C>     <C>
Richard E. Marriott.....   1997    $271,449   $108,580   $110,789(7)   $        0     $0      $ 22,668(8)
 Chairman of the Board     1996     262,951    105,180    114,969(7)            0      0        21,439(8)
                           1995     250,554    100,000    107,463(7)            0      0        12,634
Terence C. Golden(9)....   1997     619,045    557,141     58,783(10)     354,693      0        66,105
 President and Chief       1996     600,017    480,013          0      10,476,603      0       560,827(11)
 Executive Officer         1995     190,656    152,152          0               0      0             0
Robert E. Parsons, Jr...   1997     338,889    254,167          0               0      0        36,231
 Executive Vice            1996     328,447    263,490          0       3,658,277      0        26,273
 President and Chief       1995     213,767    123,649          0               0      0        10,951
 Financial Officer
Christopher J.
 Nassetta(9)............   1997     338,889    254,167          0               0      0        36,231
 Executive Vice            1996     328,447    263,490          0       3,647,513      0       119,168(11)
 President and Chief       1995      78,000     50,700          0               0      0             0
 Operating Officer
Christopher G.
 Townsend...............   1997     202,962    111,629          0       1,015,800      0        18,405
 Senior Vice President,    1996     186,232    102,428          0               0      0        15,891
 General Counsel           1995     156,375     93,825          0               0      0         7,658
</TABLE>

 
                                      133

<PAGE>
 
- --------
 (1) Fiscal year 1996 base salary earnings were for 53 weeks.
 (2) Salary amounts include base salary earned and paid in cash during the
     fiscal year, the amount of base salary deferred at the election of the
     executive officer under the Host Marriott Corporation Executive Deferred
     Compensation Plan and the increase in base salary for the period October
     1, 1997 through the end of the fiscal year which was paid in 1998.
 (3) Bonus includes the amount of cash bonus earned pursuant to Host's
     Performance-Based Annual Incentive Bonus Plan (which was approved by the
     stockholders in 1996) and to the named individual's performance-based
     bonus plan during the fiscal year, which is either paid subsequent to the
     end of each fiscal year or deferred under the Deferred Compensation Plan.
 (4) During 1997, the Compensation Policy Committee (the "Committee") of the
     Board of Directors approved the grant of restricted stock to certain key
     employees of Host, including Mr. Townsend. In 1996, the Committee
     approved similar grants of restricted stock to certain key employees of
     Host, including Messrs. Golden, Parsons and Nassetta. Mr. Golden also
     received grants of restricted stock on November 6, 1997 and on August 1,
     1996 which were pursuant to the terms of his restricted stock agreement
     with Host. Messrs. Golden, Parsons and Nassetta each received awards
     which vest over a five-year period, and Mr. Townsend received an award
     which vests over a three-year period. All such awards consist of shares
     subject to restrictions relating primarily to continued employment
     ("General Restrictions") and shares subject to annual performance
     objectives such as financial performance of Host ("Performance
     Restrictions"). Performance objectives are established by the Committee
     and are subject to annual review and revision. Sixty percent of the
     shares awarded to each executive officer have annual Performance
     Restrictions, and forty percent of the shares awarded have General
     Restrictions conditioned upon continued employment. In addition, Messrs.
     Parsons and Nassetta each received an award of restricted stock which
     vests sixty percent on December 31, 1998 and forty percent on December
     31, 2000, subject to the attainment of certain performance criteria and
     to the named individual's continued employment ("Special Team Awards").
     All Special Team Awards are presented above as "Restricted Stock Awards,"
     and the value stated above is the fair market value on the date of the
     grant. At Mr. Golden's request and in order to motivate the management
     team to enhance stockholder value, the Committee issued these Special
     Team Awards of the shares of restricted stock to key executives of Host
     in connection with Mr. Golden's joining Host. The dollar value of those
     awards has been reflected in the Restricted Stock Awards column of the
     table for the Named Executive Officers. In the event that the executives
     to whom restricted stock was granted do not continue in the employ of
     Host or do not meet the performance criteria set by the Committee, those
     shares will be forfeited, and the Committee has retained the right to
     grant any forfeited restricted shares to Mr. Golden.
 (5) The aggregate number and value of shares of deferred stock and restricted
     stock subject to "General Restrictions" and "Performance Restrictions"
     (see footnote 4 above) held by each Named Executive Officer as of the end
     of fiscal year 1997 are as follows: Mr. R.E. Marriott, 264,000 shares
     valued at $5,071,440; Mr. Golden, 655,231 shares valued at $12,586,987;
     Mr. Nassetta, 240,267 shares valued at $4,615,529; Mr. Parsons, 261,531
     shares valued at $5,073,335; and Mr. Townsend, 56,321 shares valued at
     $1,078,485. During the period in which any restrictions apply, holders of
     restricted stock are entitled to receive all dividends or other
     distributions paid with respect to such stock. Under the terms of certain
     restricted stock award agreements granted under the long-term incentive
     plan, each share of restricted stock vests upon a change in control of
     Host. The stock bonus awards granted by Host are generally derived based
     on dividing 20% of each individual's annual cash bonus award by the
     average of the high and low trading prices for a share of common stock on
     the last trading day of the fiscal year. No voting rights or dividends
     are attributed to award shares until such award shares are distributed.
     Stock bonus awards may be denominated as current awards or deferred
     awards. A current award is distributed in 10 annual installments
     commencing one year after the award is granted. A deferred award is
     distributed in a lump sum or in up to 10 annual installments following
     termination of employment. Deferred award shares contingently vest pro
     rata in annual installments commencing one year after the stock bonus
     award is granted to the employee. Awards are not subject to forfeiture
     once the employee reaches age 55 with 10 years of service with Host or
     upon (i) retirement after 20 years of service, (ii) disability or (iii)
     death.
 (6) Amounts included in "All Other Compensation" represent total matching
     Host contribution amounts received under the Retirement and Savings Plan
     and the Deferred Compensation Plan. In 1997, the amounts attributable to
     the Retirement and Savings Plan account for each Named Executive Officer
     were as follows: Mr. R.E. Marriott, $9,024; Mr. Golden, $7,939; Mr.
     Nassetta, $9,024; Mr. Parsons, $9,500; and Mr. Townsend, $8,448. The
     amounts attributable to the Deferred Compensation Plan for each named
     executive officer were as follows: Mr. R.E. Marriott, $13,644; Mr.
     Golden, $58,166; Mr. Nassetta, $27,207; Mr. Parsons, $26,731; and Mr.
     Townsend, $9,957.
 (7) Amount includes $92,000 in 1997, $86,700 in 1996, and $86,200 in 1995 for
     the allocation of Host personnel for non-Host business.
 (8) Effective beginning in 1996, Mr. R.E. Marriott waived (i) payments due to
     be made to him under the Deferred Compensation Plan following his
     retirement and (ii) common stock due to be distributed to him under
     Host's 1997 Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan following his retirement.
     In connection with this waiver, Host entered into an arrangement to
     purchase life insurance policies for the benefit of a trust established
     by Mr. R.E. Marriott. The cost of the life insurance policies to Host has
     been actuarially determined and will not exceed the projected after-tax
     cost Host expected to incur in connection with the payments under the
     Deferred Compensation Plan and the stock distributions under Host's 1997
     Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan that were waived by Mr. R.E. Marriott.
 (9) Mr. Golden joined Host as President and Chief Executive Officer on
     September 1, 1995. Mr. Nassetta joined Host as Executive Vice President
     on October 1, 1995.
(10) Amount represents reimbursement of travel expenses of Mr. Golden's spouse
     when she accompanies him on Host business trips.
(11) As part of their restricted stock agreements with Host, Messrs. Golden
     and Nassetta were awarded 44,910 and 8,421 shares of Host common stock,
     respectively, on February 1, 1996. The value of the shares was $516,465
     for Mr. Golden and $96,842 for Mr. Nassetta.
 
                                      134

<PAGE>
 
AGGREGATED STOCK OPTION EXERCISES AND YEAR-END VALUE
 
  The table below sets forth, on an aggregated basis, (i) information
regarding the exercise during fiscal year 1997 of options to purchase Host
Common Stock (and shares of the common stock of other companies which Host has
previously spun off) by each of the executive officers listed on the Executive
Compensation table above, and (ii) the value on January 2, 1998 of all
unexercised options held by such individuals. Host did not grant any options
to the executive officers listed on Table I in fiscal year 1997. Terence C.
Golden and Christopher J. Nassetta do not have any options to purchase stock
in any of the companies listed in the following table.
 
                     AGGREGATED STOCK OPTION EXERCISES IN
              LAST FISCAL YEAR AND FISCAL YEAR-END OPTION VALUES
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                                            VALUE OF UNEXERCISED IN-
                                                              NUMBER OF SHARES                         THE
                                                           UNDERLYING UNEXERCISED               MONEY OPTIONS AT
                                                         OPTIONS AT FISCAL YEAR END            FISCAL YEAR END (2)
                                                                     (#)                               (#)
                                                         --------------------------------   -------------------------
                                      SHARES
                                    ACQUIRED ON  VALUE
                                     EXERCISE   REALIZED
          NAME           COMPANY(1)     (#)       ($)    EXERCISABLE       UNEXERCISABLE    EXERCISABLE UNEXERCISABLE
          ----           ---------- ----------- -------- ---------------   --------------   ----------- -------------
<S>                      <C>        <C>         <C>      <C>               <C>              <C>         <C>
R. E. Marriott..........      HM      35,000    421,379             55,700                0    944,307         0
                             HMS           0          0             11,140                0    145,741         0
                              MI           0          0             55,700                0  3,198,557         0
                           TOTAL      35,000    421,379            122,540                0  4,288,605         0
R. E. Parsons, Jr.......      HM       2,500     40,825             20,225                0    311,837         0
                             HMS         500      5,993              4,045                0     49,212         0
                              MI           0          0              1,625                0     85,423         0
                           TOTAL       3,000     46,819             25,895                0    446,472         0
C. G. Townsend..........      HM           0          0              6,975                0    110,745         0
                             HMS           0          0              1,395                0     17,354         0
                              MI           0          0                  0                0          0         0
                           TOTAL           0          0              8,370                0    128,100         0
</TABLE>

- --------
(1) "HM" represents options to purchase Host Common Stock ("Host Options").
    "HMS" represents options to purchase HM Services common stock. "MI"
    represents options to purchase Marriott International common stock. In
    connection with Host's issuance on December 29, 1995 of a special dividend
    (the "HMS Special Dividend") of HM Services common stock to Host's
    stockholders, and pursuant to the Host Marriott Corporation 1993
    Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan, all Host Options held by employees of
    Host were adjusted to reflect the HMS Special Dividend by providing each
    option holder with the option to purchase one share of HM Services common
    stock for every option to purchase five shares of Host Common Stock held
    as of the close of business on December 29, 1995. The exercise price of
    the HM Services options was set, and the price of Host Options was
    adjusted, so that the economic value of Host Options prior to the HMS
    Special Dividend was preserved and not increased or decreased as a result
    of the HMS Special Dividend. In addition, in connection with Host's
    issuance on October 8, 1993 of a special dividend (the "MI Special
    Dividend") of Marriott International common stock to Host's stockholders,
    and pursuant to the Host Marriott Corporation 1993 Comprehensive Stock
    Incentive Plan, all Host Options held by employees of Host were adjusted
    to reflect the MI Special Dividend by providing each option holder with
    the option to purchase one share of Marriott International common stock
    for every option to purchase one share of Host Common Stock held as of the
    close of business on October 8, 1993. The exercise price of the Marriott
    International options was set, and the price of Host Options was adjusted,
    so that the economic value of Host Options prior to the MI Special
    Dividend was preserved and not increased or decreased as a result of the
    MI Special Dividend.
(2) Based on a per share price for Host Common Stock of $19.21, a per share
    price for HM Services common stock of $14.43, and a per share price for
    Marriott International common stock of $68.56. These prices reflect the
    average of the high and low trading prices on the New York Stock Exchange
    on January 2, 1998.
 
LONG-TERM INCENTIVE PLAN
 
  The table below sets forth the number of shares of Host Common Stock awarded
under a long-term incentive plan on February 1, 1996 to Messrs. Parsons and
Nassetta and on January 22, 1997 to Mr. Townsend.
 
  Richard E. Marriott and Terence C. Golden did not receive any of the type of
awards reported in the following table. These awards represent the number of
restricted shares of Host Common Stock that may vest during or at the end of a
three-year period, subject to the satisfaction of certain time and performance
restrictions established by the Compensation Policy Committee of the Board of
Directors. The vesting provisions governing
 
                                      135

<PAGE>
 
these awards are subject to review and revision by the Compensation Policy
Committee and are discussed below in the Report on Executive Compensation. The
performance criteria are set in advance of the completion of the performance
year, and if the time and performance criteria are not achieved, the full
number of shares will be forfeited.
 
  The shares may be paid in full if either of the following two formulas is
met:
 
  . Prior to November 1, 1998, the average price of Host Common Stock traded
    on the NYSE during any consecutive 60-day period shall increase to 172.8%
    of the price of Host Common Stock on November 2, 1995; or
 
  . The average of the high and low prices of Host Common Stock traded on the
    NYSE for each of the first five days of trading prior to November 1, 1998
    is 172.8% of the price of Host Common Stock on November 2, 1995.
 
  The price of Host Common Stock on November 2, 1995 was determined to be
$11.08 (which reflects an adjustment for the distribution of the common stock
of Host Marriott Services Corporation to Host's stockholders on December 29,
1995), and therefore the target price under the two formulas is $19.146 (i.e.,
172.8% of $11.08). This increase represents a 20% compounded annual growth
rate in the price of Host Common Stock.
 
                           LONG-TERM INCENTIVE PLAN
                          AWARDS IN LAST FISCAL YEAR
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                     PERFORMANCE OR OTHER PERIOD
NAME                                NUMBER OF SHARES  UNTIL MATURITY OR PAYOUT
- ----                                ---------------- ---------------------------
<S>                                 <C>              <C>
Robert E. Parsons, Jr. ............      84,206                3 years
Christopher J. Nassetta............      84,206                3 years
Christopher G. Townsend............      20,000                3 years
</TABLE>

 
EMPLOYMENT AGREEMENTS
 
  The Operating Partnership expects to have employment agreements with certain
of its executive officers but there is no assurance that this will be the
case. The terms of such agreements currently are under negotiation and are not
expected to be finalized until the Effective Date.
 
1998 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS ALLOCATION AGREEMENT
 
  As part of the REIT Conversion, Host, the Operating Partnership and
Crestline expect to enter into the 1998 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement
which is expected to govern the allocation of responsibilities with respect to
various compensation, benefits and labor matters. Under the 1998 Employees
Benefits Allocation Agreement, Crestline is expected to assume from Host REIT
certain liabilities relating to covered benefits and labor matters with
respect to individuals who are employed by Host REIT or its affiliates on or
before the completion of the REIT Conversion who will be employed by Crestline
or its affiliates ("Transferred Employees") and the Operating Partnership is
expected to assume from Host all other liabilities relating to employee
benefits and labor matters. The 1998 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement
also is expected to govern the treatment of awards under the Host Marriott
Corporation 1997 Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan, formerly called the Host
Marriott Corporation 1993 Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan (the
"Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan"), as part of the REIT Conversion. The
1998 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement is expected to require Crestline
to establish the Crestline Capital Corporation 1998 Comprehensive Stock
Incentive Plan to grant awards of Crestline common stock to Transferred
Employees. Additionally, the 1998 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement is
expected to provide that the Operating Partnership will adopt the
Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan.
 
                                      136

<PAGE>
 
COMPREHENSIVE STOCK PLAN
 
  Host sponsors the Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan for purposes of
attracting and retaining highly qualified employees. Host has reserved
44,442,911 shares of Host Common Stock for issuance pursuant to the
Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan. As part of the REIT Conversion, the
Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan is expected to be adopted by the Operating
Partnership. Shares of Host Common Stock issued or reserved under the
Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan are expected to be exchanged for Host REIT
Common Stock and Crestline common stock, according to the terms of the 1998
Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement.
 
  Under the terms of the Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan, Host may award
eligible full-time employees (i) options to purchase Host Common Stock, (ii)
deferred shares of Host Common Stock, (iii) restricted shares of Host Common
Stock, (iv) stock appreciation rights, (v) special recognition awards or (vi)
other equity-based awards, including but not limited to, phantom shares of
Host Common Stock, performance shares of Host Common Stock, bonus shares of
Host Common Stock, dividend equivalent units or similar securities or rights.
After the REIT Conversion, all grants under the Comprehensive Stock Incentive
Plan will be for Host REIT Common Stock. Host REIT intends to continue to
award options to purchase Host REIT Common Stock under the Comprehensive Stock
Incentive Plan after the REIT Conversion. Options granted to officers and key
employees of Host REIT will have an exercise price of not less than the fair
market value on the date of grant. Incentive stock options granted under the
Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan expire no later than 10 years after the
date of grant and non-qualified stock options expire up to 15 years after the
date of grant.
 
  Under the terms of the Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan, Host may award
deferred shares of Host Common Stock to eligible full-time employees. Deferred
shares may be granted as part of a bonus award or deferred stock agreement.
After the REIT Conversion, Host REIT intends to award deferred shares of Host
REIT Common Stock under the Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan. Deferred
shares generally vest over ten years in annual installments commencing one
year after the date of grant.
 
  The Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan also provides for the issuance of
restricted shares of Host Common Stock to officers and key executives to be
distributed over the next three or five years in annual installments based on
continued employment and the attainment of certain performance criteria. Host
REIT intends to award restricted shares of Host REIT Common Stock after the
REIT Conversion.
 
  Under the terms of the Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan, Host may grant
bonus awards to eligible full-time employees. Bonus awards may be part of a
management incentive program which pays part of the annual performance bonus
awarded to managers and other key employees in shares of Host Common Stock. A
bonus award entitles the holder to receive a distribution of Host's Common
Stock in accordance with the underlying agreement. Holders of bonus awards
vest in the shares covered by their award over ten years in annual
installments commencing one year after grant. Unless the holder of a bonus
award elects otherwise, vested shares are distributed in 10 consecutive,
approximately equal, annual installments. After the REIT Conversion, Host REIT
intends to award bonus awards for shares of Host REIT Common Stock.
 
  The Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan authorizes Host to grant stock
appreciation rights ("SARs") to eligible full-time employees. SARs awarded
under the Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan give the holder the right to an
amount equal to the appreciation in the value of the Host Common Stock over a
specified price. SARs may be paid on the Host Common Stock, cash or other form
or combination form of payout. After the REIT Conversion, Host REIT intends to
award SARs on Host REIT Common Stock.
 
  Under the Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan, Host may award an eligible
full-time employee or officer a Special Recognition Award. Special Recognition
Awards may be paid in the form of Host Common Stock or an option to purchase
Host Common Stock at an amount not less than fair market value on the date of
grant. After the REIT Conversion, Host REIT intends to award Special
Recognition Awards or Host REIT Common Stock to eligible full-time employees
or officers.
 
                                      137

<PAGE>
 
STOCK PURCHASE PLAN
 
  Host sponsors the Host Marriott Corporation Employee Stock Purchase Plan
(the "Stock Purchase Plan"). Under the terms of the Stock Purchase Plan, an
individual who is: (i) an active eligible employee on the last day of the
prior plan year, (ii) working more than 20 hours per week and (iii)
customarily employed more than five months in a calendar year may, on the
first day of the plan year, purchase Host Common Stock through contributions
or payroll deductions at the lower of the fair market value on the first or
last day of such plan year. Host REIT expects to continue the Stock Purchase
Plan after the REIT Conversion.
 
401(K) PLAN
 
  Host sponsors the Host Marriott Corporation Retirement and Saving Plan (the
"401(k) Plan"). The 401(k) Plan has received a favorable ruling from the
Internal Revenue Service ("IRS") as to its tax-qualified status. The 401(k)
Plan is expected to be adopted by the Operating Partnership as part of the
REIT Conversion. The 401(k) Plan is available to all eligible employees
immediately upon their date of hire. A participant may elect to contribute
from 1% to 15% of his compensation to the 401(k) Plan. Each year, Host makes a
fixed matching contribution equal to 50% of the first 6% of the compensation
contributed to the 401(k) Plan by employees. In addition, Host may make a
discretionary contribution, in an amount, if any, determined annually by the
Board, to the 401(k) Plan for the benefit of eligible employees.
 
  Under the terms of the 401(k) Plan, participants may elect to invest part or
all of their plan benefits in Host Common Stock. As part of the Merger, all
shares of Host Common Stock held under the 401(k) Plan are expected to be
converted to Host REIT Common Stock, and shares of Crestline common stock will
be received with respect thereto as part of the Initial E&P Distribution.
After the REIT Conversion, Host REIT expects to allow the 401(k) Plan's
participants to elect to invest all or part of their plan benefits in Host
REIT Common Stock.
 
DEFERRED COMPENSATION PLAN
 
  Host sponsors the Host Marriott Corporation Non-Employee Directors' Deferred
Stock Compensation Plan (the "Deferred Compensation Plan") for purposes of
attracting and retaining qualified non-employee Directors. Under the terms of
the Deferred Compensation Plan, a non-employee Director may elect to defer
payment of part or all of his Directors' fees from Host until such individual
is no longer a member of the Board. Currently, fees that are deferred under
the Deferred Compensation Plan are converted into shares of Host Common Stock
using the fair market value of such shares on the date of deferral. After the
REIT Conversion, Host REIT intends to invest Directors' fees deferred under
the Deferred Compensation Plan in Host REIT Common Stock.
 
  Non-Employee Directors may elect to receive payment of their benefits under
the Deferred Compensation Plan in cash or Host Common Stock. After the REIT
Conversion, Host REIT expects to allow participants in the Deferred
Compensation Plan to elect to receive their benefits in cash or Host REIT
Common Stock.
 
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY AND INDEMNIFICATION
 
  The Host REIT Charter and Host REIT Bylaws contain provisions limiting the
liability of Host REIT's present and former directors and officers to the
corporation and its stockholders and obligating Host REIT to indemnify present
and former directors and officers all in accordance with Maryland law. See
"The Restructuring Transactions--Limitation of Liability and Indemnification
of Directors and Officers."
 
INDEMNIFICATION AGREEMENTS
 
  Host REIT intends to enter into indemnification agreements with each of its
directors and officers. The indemnification agreements will require, among
other things, that Host REIT indemnify its directors and officers to the
fullest extent permitted by law and advance to its directors and officers all
related expenses, subject to reimbursement if it is subsequently determined
that indemnification is not permitted.
 
                                      138

<PAGE>
 
                CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS
 
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HOST AND MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL
 
  Host and Marriott International, prior to October 8, 1993, were operated as
a single consolidated company. On October 8, 1993 in connection with the
issuance of a special dividend (the "Marriott International Distribution"),
the consolidated company's businesses were split between Host and Marriott
International. Thereafter, Host retained the capital intensive lodging real
estate business (the "Ownership Business") and the airport/tollroad
concessions business (the "Host/Travel Plazas Business"), while Marriott
International took over the management of the lodging and service management
businesses (the "Lodging/Service Management Business"). (On December 29, 1995,
Host distributed the Host/Travel Plazas Business to the stockholders of HM
Services; see "--Relationship between Host and Host Marriott Services
Corporation" below.) On the date of the Marriott International Distribution,
Host and its subsidiaries and Marriott International and its subsidiaries
entered into certain contractual arrangements governing their relationship
following the Marriott International Distribution.
 
  J.W. Marriott, Jr. and Richard E. Marriott beneficially own approximately  %
and  %, respectively, of the outstanding shares of common stock of Marriott
International. By reason of their ownership of such shares of common stock of
Marriott International and their positions as Chairman and a Director,
respectively, of Marriott International, J.W. Marriott, Jr. and Richard E.
Marriott, who will also be a Director and Chairman, respectively, of Host
REIT, could be deemed in control of Marriott International within the meaning
of the federal securities laws. Other members of the Marriott family might
also be deemed control persons of Marriott International by reason of their
ownership of shares of Marriott International and/or their relationship to
other family members.
 
  Prior to the Marriott International Distribution, Host and Marriott
International entered into a Distribution Agreement (the "Marriott
International Distribution Agreement"), which provided for, among other
things, (i) the division between Host and Marriott International of certain
liabilities and (ii) certain other agreements governing the relationship
between Host and Marriott International following the Marriott International
Distribution.
 
  Subject to certain exceptions, the Marriott International Distribution
Agreement provided for, among other things, assumptions of liabilities and
cross-indemnities designed to allocate, effective as of the Marriott
International Distribution, financial responsibility for the liabilities
arising out of or in connection with the Lodging/Service Management Business
to Marriott International and its subsidiaries, and financial responsibility
for the liabilities arising out of or in connection with the Ownership
Business and Host/Travel Plazas Business, along with the consolidated
company's liabilities under a substantial portion of its pre-existing
financing and long-term debt obligations, to Host and its retained
subsidiaries. The agreements executed in connection with the Marriott
International Distribution Agreement also set forth certain specific
allocations of liabilities between Host and Marriott International.
 
  Under the Marriott International Distribution Agreement, Marriott
International obtained the Marriott International Purchase Right which
provided Marriott International with the right, until June 2017, to purchase
up to 20% of each class of Host's voting stock (determined after assuming full
exercise of the right) at its then fair market value (based on an average of
trading prices during a specified period), upon the occurrence of certain
specified events generally involving a change in control of Host. The Marriott
International Purchase Right could be exercised for a 30-day period following
the date a person or group of affiliated persons has (i) become the beneficial
owner of 20% or more of the total voting power of the then outstanding shares
of Host's voting stock or (ii) announced a tender offer for 30% more of the
total voting power of the then outstanding shares of Host's common stock. The
purchase price for the common stock to be purchased upon the exercise of the
Marriott International Purchase Right is determined by taking the average of
the closing sale price of the common stock during the 30 consecutive trading
days preceding the date the Marriott International Purchase Right becomes
exercisable. The Marriott International Purchase Right will continue in effect
with respect to Host REIT after the
 
                                      139

<PAGE>
 
Merger, subject to the following limitations intended to protect the REIT
status of Host REIT. The Marriott International Purchase Right will be
exercisable only to the extent that neither (i) Marriott International, or any
entity in which it has a direct or indirect interest and which would be
deemed, under the applicable attribution rules, to own the shares of Host REIT
owned by Marriott International, would be deemed to own, taking into account
the applicable attribution rules, more than 9.9% of Crestline, any subsidiary
of Crestline or any other tenant of Host REIT nor (ii) any owners of direct or
indirect interests in Marriott International would, as a result of such
exercise, own, taking into account the applicable attribution rules, more than
9.8% of both Host REIT and Crestline, any subsidiary of Crestline or any other
tenant of Host REIT. In addition to the foregoing limitation, the Marriott
International Purchase Right will be exercisable only if such acquisition and
ownership of Host REIT Common Stock would not cause the Operating Partnership
to be considered to own, directly or by attribution, 10% or more of Crestline,
any subsidiary of Crestline or any other tenant of Host REIT.
 
  The Marriott International Purchase Right will have an antitakeover effect
to the extent that any person considering acquiring a substantial or
controlling block of Host REIT Common Stock will face the possibility that its
ability to exercise control would be impaired by the exercise of Marriott
International's Purchase Right. In addition, the exercise price of the
Marriott International Purchase Right could be lower than the price at which a
potential acquiror might be willing to purchase a 20% block of Host REIT
Common Stock because the purchase price for the Marriott International
Purchase Right is based on the average trading price during a 30-day period
which may be prior to the announcement of a takeover event. This potential
price differential might have a further antitakeover effect by discouraging
potential acquirors of Host REIT.
 
  For the purpose of governing certain of the ongoing relationships between
Host and Marriott International after the Marriott International Distribution,
Host and Marriott International have entered into other agreements. Host
believes that the agreements are fair to both parties and contain terms which
are generally comparable to those which would have been reached in arm's-
length negotiations with unaffiliated parties. Among such other agreements
between Host and Marriott International are:
 
    (i) Lodging Management and Franchise Agreements. Marriott International
  and certain of its subsidiaries have entered into management agreements
  with Host and certain of its subsidiaries to manage for fees the Marriott
  Hotels, Resorts and Suites, Ritz-Carlton hotels, Courtyard hotels and
  Residence Inns owned or leased by Host and its subsidiaries. Marriott
  International has also entered into franchise agreements with Host and
  certain of its subsidiaries to allow Host to use the Marriott brand,
  associated trademarks, reservation systems and other related items in
  connection with Host's operation of ten Marriott hotels not managed by
  Marriott International.
 
    Each of those management and franchise agreements reflects market terms
  and conditions and is substantially similar to the terms of management and
  franchise agreements with other third-party owners regarding lodging
  facilities of a similar type. In 1997, Host paid to Marriott International
  fees of $166 million from the managed and franchised lodging properties
  owned or leased by Host.
 
    In addition, Host or one of its subsidiaries is a partner in several
  unconsolidated partnerships (some of which will be consolidated in
  connection with the REIT Conversion) that, at the end of 1997, owned 241
  lodging properties operated by Marriott International or certain of its
  subsidiaries under long-term agreements. In such cases, Host or its
  subsidiary typically serves as the general partner. In 1997, these
  unconsolidated partnerships paid to Marriott International fees of $119
  million pursuant to such agreements. The partnerships also paid $23 million
  in rent to Marriott International in 1997 for land leased from Marriott
  International upon which certain of the limited service partnerships'
  hotels are located.
 
    In connection with the REIT Conversion, these management and franchise
  agreements will be assigned to the Lessees for the term of the applicable
  Leases (but the Operating Partnership will remain obligated in the event
  the Lessees fail to perform their obligations).
 
    (ii) Credit Agreement. In 1995, Marriott International and a subsidiary
  of Host entered into a Credit Agreement pursuant to which the subsidiary
  had the right to borrow up to $225 million from Marriott International. In
  1997, however, Host entered into a revolving line of credit agreement with
  third parties, and as a result, Host terminated the revolving line of
  credit under the Credit Agreement with Marriott
 
                                      140

<PAGE>
 
  International. Host remains subject to various covenants and guaranty
  reimbursement obligations under the Credit Agreement.
 
    (iii) Tax Sharing Agreement. Host and Marriott International have entered
  into a tax sharing agreement that defines the parties' rights and
  obligations with respect to deficiencies and refunds of federal, state and
  other income or franchise taxes relating to Host's businesses for tax years
  prior to the Marriott International Distribution and with respect to
  certain tax attributes of Host after the Marriott International
  Distribution. Host and Marriott International have agreed to cooperate with
  each other and to share information in preparing tax returns and in dealing
  with other tax matters.
 
    (iv) Noncompetition Agreements. Host and Marriott International entered
  into a noncompetition agreement that defines the parties' rights and
  obligations with respect to certain businesses operated by Marriott
  International and Host. In general, under the noncompetition agreements,
  Host and its subsidiaries are prohibited from entering into or acquiring
  any business that competes with the hotel management business as conducted
  by Marriott International until October 8, 2000. See "--Senior Living
  Communities Acquisitions."
 
    (v) Administrative Services Agreements. Marriott International and Host
  have entered into a number of agreements pursuant to which Marriott
  International has agreed to provide certain continuing administrative
  services to Host and its subsidiaries. Such services are provided on market
  terms and conditions. In general, the administrative services agreements
  can be kept in place at least through the end of 1998.
 
    (vi) Marriott International Guarantees. In connection with the Marriott
  International Distribution, Host and Marriott International entered into
  agreements pursuant to which Marriott International has agreed to guarantee
  Host's performance in connection with certain partnership, real estate and
  project loans and other Host obligations. Such guarantees are limited in an
  aggregate principal amount of up to $107 million at June 19, 1998. Marriott
  International has not been required to make any payments pursuant to the
  guarantees.
 
  In addition to the foregoing agreements, Host and Marriott International
have had occasion to enter into other agreements in the ordinary course of
business. Host believes that such agreements are fair to both parties and
contain terms which are generally comparable to those which would have been
reached in arm's-length negotiations with unaffiliated parties. Among such
other agreements between Host and Marriott International are:
 
    (a) Hotel Acquisitions. Marriott International has provided, and Host
  expects that Marriott International in the future will provide, financing
  to Host for a portion of the cost of acquiring properties to be operated or
  franchised by Marriott International. In 1997, Marriott International did
  not provide any new acquisition financing, although Host remained indebted
  to Marriott International for acquisition financing from prior years.
  Marriott International provided Host with $70 million of mortgage financing
  in 1995 for the acquisition of three full-service hotels at an average
  interest rate of 8.5%. Marriott International subsequently sold one of the
  loans in 1996. In 1996, Marriott International and Host formed a joint
  venture (which will be owned by a Non-Controlled Subsidiary) and Marriott
  International provided Host with $29 million in debt financing at an
  average interest rate of 12.7% and with $28 million in preferred equity,
  for the acquisition of two full-service hotels in Mexico City.
 
    (b) Senior Living Communities Acquisitions. On June 21, 1997, Host
  acquired the outstanding common stock of Forum Group, Inc. (the "Forum
  Group") from Marriott Senior Living Services, Inc., a subsidiary of
  Marriott International. Host purchased the Forum Group portfolio of 29
  premier senior living communities for approximately $460 million, including
  approximately $270 million in debt ($59 million of which was provided by
  Marriott International). In 1997, Host had completed $56 million of the
  approximately $107 million expansion plan to add approximately 1,060 units
  to these communities. As a result, an additional $33 million of debt
  financing has been provided by Marriott International and Marriott
  International may provide additional financing as the expansion plan is
  completed. The properties will continue to be managed by Marriott
  International. From the date of acquisition through the end of 1997, Host
  paid to Marriott International management fees of $6 million from the
  senior living properties owned
 
                                      141

<PAGE>
 
  by Host. In connection with the acquisition, Host and Marriott
  International entered into a noncompetition agreement that defines the
  parties' rights and obligations with respect to the operation of senior
  living services by Marriott International and Host. In general, under the
  noncompetition agreement, Host and its subsidiaries are prohibited from
  entering into or acquiring any business that competes with the senior
  living management business as conducted by Marriott International until
  2017. In 1997, Host also acquired all but 1% of the remaining 50% interest
  in the joint venture which owned the 418-unit Leisure Park senior living
  community from Marriott International for approximately $23 million,
  including approximately $15 million of mortgage debt assumed by Host.
  Shares of Crestline, which will own the senior living communities business,
  will be distributed to Host's stockholders as part of the Initial E&P
  Distribution in connection with the REIT Conversion.
 
    (c) 1993 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement. Host and Marriott
  International have entered into an Employee Benefits and Other Employment
  Matters Allocation Agreement ("1993 Employee Benefits Allocation
  Agreement") that provides for the allocation of certain responsibilities
  with respect to employment compensation, benefit and labor matters. The
  1993 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement was amended as of March 27,
  1998 to: (i) reflect various conversions and redenominations that were
  necessary as a result of the spin-off and acquisitions described in
  Marriott International's February 12, 1998 Proxy, and to add New Marriott
  MI, Inc. (renamed Marriott International, Inc.) as a party to the 1993
  Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement. In general, the 1993 Employee
  Benefits Allocation Agreement provides that Host retained all employee
  liabilities for employees who on or after the Marriott International
  Distribution were employees of Host, and that old Marriott International,
  Inc., which was renamed Sodexho Marriott Services, Inc., in 1998, retained
  all liabilities for employees who on or after the Marriott Distribution
  were employees of Marriott International. Pursuant to the 1993 Employee
  Benefits Allocation Agreement, and in connection with the Marriott
  Distribution, Host also adjusted outstanding awards under the Host employee
  benefit plans. The 1993 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement is expected
  to be amended as part of the REIT Conversion to add the Operating
  Partnership and Crestline as parties to the agreement and to reflect the
  1998 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement.
 
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HOST AND HOST MARRIOTT SERVICES CORPORATION
 
  On December 29, 1995, Host issued a special dividend (the "HMSC
Distribution") which split Host's businesses between Host and HM Services.
Prior to December 29, 1995, HM Services was a wholly-owned subsidiary of Host.
Thereafter, Host retained the capital intensive lodging real estate business
(the "Ownership Business"), while HM Services took over the airport/tollroad
concessions business (the "Host/Travel Plazas Business"). Host and its
subsidiaries and HM Services and its subsidiaries have entered into certain
relationships following the HMSC Distribution.
 
  Richard E. Marriott and J.W. Marriott, Jr. beneficially own approximately
6.75% and 6.88%, respectively, of the outstanding shares of common stock of HM
Services. By reason of their ownership of such shares of common stock of HM
Services and their positions as Directors of HM Services, Richard E. Marriott
and J.W. Marriott, Jr., who are also Chairman and a Director, respectively, of
Host, could be deemed in control of HM Services within the meaning of the
federal securities laws. Other members of the Marriott family might also be
deemed control persons of HM Services by reason of their ownership of shares
of HM Services and/or their relationship to other family members.
 
  Prior to the HMSC Distribution, Host and HM Services entered into a
Distribution Agreement (the "HMSC Distribution Agreement"), which provided
for, among other things, (i) certain asset transfers to occur prior to the
HMSC Distribution, (ii) the HMSC Distribution, (iii) the division between Host
and HM Services of certain liabilities and (iv) certain other agreements
governing the relationship between Host and HM Services following the HMSC
Distribution.
 
  Subject to certain exceptions, the HMSC Distribution Agreement provides for,
among other things, assumptions of liabilities and cross-indemnities designed
to allocate, effective as of the HMSC Distribution, financial responsibility
for the liabilities arising out of or in connection with the Host/Travel
Plazas Business to
 
                                      142

<PAGE>
 
HM Services and its subsidiaries and financial responsibility for the
liabilities arising out of or in connection with the Ownership Business to
Host and its retained subsidiaries. The agreements executed in connection with
the HMSC Distribution Agreement also set forth certain specific allocations of
liabilities between Host and HM Services. The HMSC Distribution Agreement also
provides that HM Services will assume its proportionate share of Host's
current obligation for certain employee benefit awards denominated in Host
common stock currently held by employees of Marriott International.
 
  For the purpose of governing certain of the ongoing relationships between
Host and HM Services after the HMSC Distribution, Host and HM Services have
entered into other agreements. Host believes that the agreements are fair to
both parties and contain terms which are generally comparable to those which
would have been reached in arm's-length negotiations with unaffiliated
parties. Among such other agreements between Host and HM Services are:
 
    (i) Tax Sharing Agreement. Host and HM Services have entered into a tax
  sharing agreement that defines the parties' rights and obligations with
  respect to deficiencies and refunds of federal, state and other income or
  franchise taxes relating to Host's businesses for tax years prior to the
  HMSC Distribution and with respect to certain tax attributes of Host after
  the HMSC Distribution. Host and HM Services have agreed to cooperate with
  each other and to share information in preparing tax returns and in dealing
  with other tax matters.
 
    (ii) Guarantees of Concession Agreements. Host and HM Services have
  entered into agreements pursuant to which Host has agreed to guarantee HM
  Services' performance in connection with certain tollroad concessions
  operated by HM Services. Host has not been required to make any payment
  pursuant to the guarantees and does not anticipate making any such payment
  in 1998.
 
    (iii) 1995 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement. Host and HM Services
  have entered into an Employee Benefits and Other Employment Matters
  Allocation Agreement (the "1995 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement")
  that provides for the allocation of certain responsibilities with respect
  to employee compensation, benefits and labor matters. In general, the 1995
  Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement provides that Host retain all
  employee liabilities for employees who on or after the HMSC Distribution
  were employees of Host, and that HM Services retain all employee
  liabilities for employees who on or after the HMSC Distribution were
  employees of HM Services. Pursuant to the 1995 Employee Benefits Allocation
  Agreement, and in connection with the HMSC Distribution, Host also adjusted
  outstanding awards under Host employee benefit plans. The 1995 Employee
  Benefits Allocation Agreement is expected to be amended as part of the REIT
  Conversion to add the Operating Partnership and Crestline as parties to the
  agreement and to reflect the 1998 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement.
 
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HOST AND CRESTLINE CAPITAL CORPORATION AFTER THE INITIAL
E&P DISTRIBUTION
 
  For the purposes of governing certain of the ongoing relationships between
Crestline and Host after the Initial E&P Distribution and to provide
mechanisms for an orderly transition, Crestline and Host will enter into, in
addition to the Leases, various agreements, as described below.
 
  Distribution Agreement
 
  Prior to the Initial E&P Distribution, Crestline and Host will enter into a
distribution agreement (the "Distribution Agreement"), which will provide for,
among other things, (i) the distribution of shares of Crestline in connection
with the Initial E&P Distribution; (ii) the division between Crestline and
Host of certain assets and liabilities; (iii) the contribution to Crestline of
Host's 3% general partnership interest in Boynton Beach Limited Partnership,
which owns a senior living community located in Boynton Beach; and (iv)
certain other agreements governing the relationship between Crestline and Host
following the Initial E&P Distribution.
 
  Subject to certain exceptions, the Distribution Agreement will provide for,
among other things, assumptions of liabilities and cross-indemnities designed
to allocate to Crestline, effective as of the date of the Initial E&P
Distribution, financial responsibilities for liabilities arising out of or in
connection with the business of the senior living communities.
 
                                      143

<PAGE>
 
  The Distribution Agreement also will provide that by the date of the Initial
E&P Distribution, Crestline and Host will take all necessary actions which may
be required to amend Crestline's Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws.
 
  The Distribution Agreement also will provide that each of Crestline and Host
will be granted access to certain records and information in the possession of
the other, and will require the retention by each of Crestline and Host for a
period of ten years following the Initial E&P Distribution of all such
information in its possession, and thereafter will require that each party
give the other prior notice of its intention to dispose of such information.
The Distribution Agreement also will require the allocation of shared
privileges with respect to certain information and will require each of
Crestline and Host to obtain the consent of the other prior to waiving any
shared privilege.
 
  Tax Sharing Agreement
 
  Crestline and Host will enter into a tax sharing agreement (the "Tax Sharing
Agreement") which will define each party's rights and obligations with respect
to deficiencies and refunds of federal, state and other income or franchise
taxes relating to Crestline's business for taxable years prior to the Initial
E&P Distribution and with respect to certain tax attributes of Crestline after
the Initial E&P Distribution. Generally, Host will be responsible for filing
consolidated returns and paying taxes for periods prior to the date of the
Initial E&P Distribution, and Crestline will be responsible for filing returns
and paying taxes for subsequent periods.
 
  Asset Management Agreement
 
  Crestline and Host will enter into an asset management agreement (the "Asset
Management Agreement"), pursuant to which Crestline will agree to provide
review and advice on the management and operation of the hotels in order to
assist Host in making strategic decisions. Generally, Crestline will provide
the following consulting services in its capacity as the Lessee of the hotels:
(i) review of operating and financial results (including site visits) and meet
with Host, at least quarterly, to review such results of the hotels; (ii)
review of financial statements and budgets, including periodic accounting
statements, annual operating budgets, FF&E budgets and management analysis
reports; (iii) revenue and capital spending projections; (iv) administration
of hotel mortgages; (v) advice relating to any changes to the hotel management
agreements; (vi) review of market conditions and competition for each of the
hotels; and (vii) monitoring and negotiating with governmental agencies in
connection with any condemnation proceedings against the hotels. Crestline
will be paid a fee of $4.5 million for each fiscal year for its consulting
services under the Asset Management Agreement. The Asset Management Agreement
will have a term of two years with an automatic one year renewal, unless
terminated earlier by either party.
 
  Corporate Transitional Services Agreement
 
  Crestline and Host will, prior to the date of the Initial E&P Distribution,
enter into a transitional services agreement (the "Corporate Transitional
Services Agreement") pursuant to which Crestline and Host will provide certain
limited services to each other for a fee. Among other things, Host will
provide centralized administrative and computer systems services to Crestline.
 
  Non-Competition Agreement
 
  Crestline and Host will enter into a non-competition agreement that limits
the respective parties' future business opportunities. See "Business and
Properties--Non-Competition Agreements."
 
  1998 Employee Benefits and Other Employment Matters Allocation Agreement
 
  As part of the REIT Conversion, Host, the Operating Partnership and
Crestline expect to enter into the 1998 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement
relating to various compensation, benefits and labor matters. See
"Management--1998 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement."
 
                                      144

<PAGE>
 
  Guaranty and Pooling Agreements
 
  Crestline and certain of its subsidiaries will enter into a limited guaranty
of the lease and management agreement obligations of each Lessee. For each of
the four identified "pools" of hotels, the cumulative limit of the guaranty at
any time will be 10% of the aggregate rents under all Leases in such pool paid
with respect to the preceding twelve full calendar months (with an annualized
amount based upon the Minimum Rent for those full-service Leases that have not
been in effect for 12 full calendar months).
 
                                      145

<PAGE>
 
                            PRINCIPAL STOCKHOLDERS
 
  The following table sets forth, as of July 31, 1998, the beneficial
ownership of Host REIT Common Stock and OP Units of (i) each person who is
expected to hold more than a 5% interest in Host REIT or the Operating
Partnership, (ii) directors of Host REIT, (iii) the Chief Executive Officer
and the four most highly compensated executive officers of Host REIT and (iv)
the directors and executive officers of Host REIT as a group. Unless otherwise
indicated in the footnotes, all of such interests are owned directly and the
indicated person or entity has sole voting and investment power.
 
  The "Percent of All Common Stock and OP Units" represents the number of
shares of Host REIT Common Stock and OP Units the person is expected to hold
immediately after the REIT Conversion, as a percentage of the total number of
shares of Host REIT Common Stock and OP Units expected to be outstanding
immediately after the REIT Conversion (excluding OP Units held by Host REIT
and its subsidiaries). The information in this table assumes that all
transactions comprising the REIT Conversion are consummated as currently
expected. The address of each beneficial owner is 10400 Fernwood Road,
Bethesda, Maryland 20817 unless otherwise indicated.

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                     PERCENT  PERCENT OF
                                    PERCENT OF NUMBER OF  PERCENT OF  OF ALL  ALL COMMON
                          NUMBER OF   ALL OP     COMMON     COMMON    COMMON   STOCK AND
          NAME            OP UNITS   UNITS(1)   STOCK(2)   STOCK(3)  STOCK(4) OP UNITS(5)
          ----            --------- ---------- ---------- ---------- -------- -----------
<S>                       <C>       <C>        <C>        <C>        <C>      <C>
R. Theodore Ammon.......       0         *         15,500      *
Robert M. Baylis........       0         *         13,500      *
Terence C. Golden(6)....       0         *        781,684      *
J.W. Marriott,
 Jr.(6)(7)(8)...........                       13,275,014    6.49
Richard E.
 Marriott(6)(8)(9)......                       13,203,209    6.45
Ann Dore McLaughlin.....       0         *          9,500      *
John G. Schreiber(11)...                                0      *
Harry L. Vincent, Jr....       0         *         25,100      *
Christopher J.
 Nassetta(6)............       0         *        356,201      *
Robert E. Parsons,
 Jr.(6).................       0         *        404,244      *
Christopher G.
 Townsend(6)............       0         *        109,417      *
Blackstone
 Entities(12)...........                                0      *
Dresdner RCM Global
 Investors LLC(13)......       0         *     13,595,975    6.65
FMR Corp.(14)...........       0         *     22,532,574   11.02
Southeastern Asset
 Management, Inc.(15)...       0         *     36,758,000   17.98
ALL DIRECTORS AND
 EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AS A
 GROUP (11
 PERSONS)(6)(10)........                       24,209,204   11.84
</TABLE>

- --------
 * less than 1%
 (1) Represents the number of OP Units held by the person as a percentage of
     the total number of OP Units to be issued to persons other than Host REIT
     and its subsidiaries in the REIT Conversion (   OP Units), assuming a
     maximum value of $   per OP Unit in the Partnership Mergers.
 (2) Consists of Host REIT Common Stock received in the REIT Conversion as a
     result of ownership of Host.
 (3) Represents the number of shares of Host REIT Common Stock held by the
     person as a percentage of the total number of shares of Host REIT Common
     Stock expected to be outstanding immediately following the REIT
     Conversion (   shares of Host REIT Common Stock).
 (4) Assumes that all OP Units held by the person are redeemed for Host REIT
     Common Stock. The total number of shares of Host REIT Common Stock
     outstanding used in calculating this percentage (   shares of Host REIT
     Common Stock plus the number of OP Units beneficially owned by the
     person) assumes that none of the OP Units held by other persons are
     redeemed for Host REIT Common Stock.
 (5) Assumes that all OP Units held by the person are redeemed for Host REIT
     Common Stock. The total number of shares of Host REIT Common Stock and OP
     Units outstanding used in calculating this percentage (  ) assumes that
     all of the OP Units held by other persons also are redeemed for Host REIT
     Common Stock.
 (6) Includes (i) the shares of unvested restricted stock granted under Host's
     1993 and 1997 Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plans, which are voted by the
     holder thereof and (ii) the following number of shares which could be
     acquired by the named persons through the exercise of stock options
     within 60 days of July 1, 1998: for J.W. Marriott, Jr., 810,447 shares;
     for Richard E. Marriott, 55,700 shares; for Mr. Parsons, 15,225 shares;
     for Mr. Townsend, 6,975 shares; and for all directors and executive
     officers as a group, 913,147 shares. Does not include any other shares
     reserved, contingently vested or awarded under the above-named Plan.
 (7) Includes: (i) 1,977,450 shares held in trust for which J.W. Marriott, Jr.
     is the trustee or a co-trustee; (ii) 68,426 shares held by the wife of
     J.W. Marriott, Jr.; (iii) 704,555 shares held in trust for which the wife
     of J.W. Marriott, Jr. is the trustee or a co-trustee; (iv) 2,451,787
     shares held by the J. Willard Marriott Foundation of which J.W. Marriott,
     Jr. is a co-trustee; (v) 2,707,590 shares held by a limited partnership
     whose general partner is a corporation of which J.W. Marriott, Jr. is the
     controlling stockholder; and (vi) 80,000 shares held by a limited
     partnership whose general partner is J.W. Marriott, Jr.; does not include
     shares held by the adult children of J.W. Marriott, Jr.; J.W. Marriott,
     Jr. disclaims beneficial ownership of all such shares.
 
                                      146

<PAGE>
 
 (8) By virtue of their ownership of shares of Host Common Stock and their
     positions as Chairman and Director, respectively, Richard E. Marriott and
     J.W. Marriott, Jr. could be deemed in control of Host within the meaning
     of the federal securities laws. Other members of the Marriott family
     might also be deemed control persons by reason of their ownership of
     shares and/or their relationship to other family members. J.W. Marriott,
     Jr., Richard E. Marriott, their mother Alice S. Marriott and other
     members of the Marriott family and various trusts established by members
     of the Marriott family owned beneficially an aggregate of 25,179,933
     shares, or 12.31% of the total shares outstanding of Host Common Stock as
     of July 31, 1998.
 (9) Includes: (i) 1,874,709 shares held in trust for which Richard E.
     Marriott is the trustee or a co-trustee; (ii) 68,219 shares held by the
     wife of Richard E. Marriott; (iii) 603,828 shares held in trust for which
     the wife of Richard E. Marriott is the trustee or a co-trustee; (iv)
     2,451,787 shares held by the J. Willard Marriott Foundation of which
     Richard E. Marriott is a co-trustee; and (v) 2,302,729 shares held by a
     corporation of which Richard E. Marriott is the controlling stockholder;
     does not include shares held by the adult children of Richard E.
     Marriott; Richard E. Marriott disclaims beneficial ownership of all such
     shares.
(10)  Includes the total number of shares held by trusts for which both J.W.
     Marriott, Jr. and Richard E. Marriott are co-trustees. Beneficial
     ownership of such shares is attributable to each of J.W. Marriott, Jr.
     and Richard E. Marriott in the table above under the Director subheading,
     but such shares are included only once in reporting the total number of
     shares owned by all directors and executive officers as a group. All
     directors and executive officers as a group (other than members of the
     Marriott family) owned beneficially an aggregate of 1,757,788 shares, or
     0.86%, of the total shares outstanding as of July 31, 1998. In addition,
     Host's Retirement and Savings Plan owned 65,257 shares, or 0.03% of the
     total shares outstanding as of July 31, 1998.
(11) OP Units include only John G. Schreiber's proportionate share of OP Units
     to be received by the Blackstone Entities in the Blackstone Acquisition;
     John G. Schreiber disclaims beneficial ownership of all other OP Units to
     be acquired by the Blackstone Entities.
(12) The Blackstone Entities constitute a series of affiliated partnerships.
     Initially, a majority of the OP Units received pursuant to the Blackstone
     Acquisition will be held by such affiliated partnerships, but eventually
     will be distributed by such affiliated partnerships to their partners.
(13) Represents shares of Host Common Stock held by Dresdner RCM Global
     Investors LLC ("Dresdner RCM") and its affiliates, RCM Limited L.P. ("RCM
     Limited") and RCM General Corporation ("RCM General"), and by Dresdner
     Bank AG, of which Dresdner RCM is a wholly owned subsidiary. Dresdner RCM
     has reported in a Schedule 13G under the Exchange Act, filed with the
     Commission, sole dispositive power over 12,943,675 shares and shared
     dispositive power over 282,000 shares. Of these shares, Dresdner RCM has
     reported sole voting power over 8,854,200 shares and does not share
     voting power with respect to any shares. In addition, Dresdner Bank AG
     has reported in a separate Schedule 13G under the Exchange Act, filed
     with the Commission, sole dispositive and voting power over 370,300
     shares of Host Common Stock, and such shares are included in the number
     reported in this table. The principal business address of Dresdner RCM,
     RCM Limited and RCM General is Four Embarcadero Center, San Francisco,
     California 94111. The principal business address of Dresdner Bank AG is
     Jurgen Ponto-Platz 1, 60301 Frankfurt, Germany.
(14) Represents shares of Host Common Stock held by FMR Corp. ("FMR") and its
     subsidiaries, Fidelity Management Trust Company ("FMT") and Fidelity
     Management & Research Company ("FM&R"). FMR has reported in a Schedule
     13G under the Exchange Act, filed with the Commission, that FMR, through
     its control of FM&R and certain investment funds for which FM&R acts as
     an investment adviser, has sole power to dispose of 22,474,835 shares of
     Host Common Stock owned by such investment funds, including the
     15,610,500 shares of Host Common Stock (or 7.64% of the total shares
     outstanding of Host Common Stock as of July 31, 1998) held by the
     Fidelity Magellan Fund. FMR has no power to vote or direct the voting of
     the shares of Host Common Stock owned by the investment funds, which
     power resides with the Board of Directors of such investment funds. FMR,
     through its control of FMT and certain institutional accounts for which
     FMT serves as investment manager, has sole dispositive power over 57,739
     shares, the sole power to vote or direct the voting of 44,301 shares, and
     no power to vote or direct the voting of 13,438 shares of Host Common
     Stock owned by the institutional accounts. The principal business address
     for FMR, FMT and FM&R is 82 Devonshire Street, Boston, Massachusetts
     02109.
(15) Represents shares of Host Common Stock held by Southeastern Asset
     Management, Inc. ("SAM"). SAM has reported in a Schedule 13G under the
     Exchange Act, filed with the Commission, sole dispositive power over
     21,730,700 shares and shared dispositive power over 14,968,300 shares. Of
     these shares, SAM has reported sole voting power over 18,338,100 shares,
     shared voting power over 14,968,300 shares and no power to vote 3,451,600
     shares. The principal business address of SAM is 6075 Poplar Avenue,
     Suite 900, Memphis, Tennessee 38119.
 
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                    DESCRIPTION OF HOST REIT CAPITAL STOCK
 
  The summary description of the capital stock of Host REIT set forth below
does not purport to be complete and is subject to and qualified in its
entirety by reference to the Host REIT Charter and Host REIT Bylaws, to be
effective upon completion of the Merger, attached as Exhibits A and B,
respectively, to the Agreement, which is attached to this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus as Appendix A.
 
GENERAL
 
  The Host REIT Charter provides that the total number of shares of stock of
all classes which Host REIT has authority to issue is 800,000,000 shares of
stock, initially consisting of 750,000,000 shares of Host REIT Common Stock
and 50,000,000 shares of Host REIT Preferred Stock. The Board of Directors is
authorized, without a vote of stockholders, to classify or reclassify any
unissued shares of capital stock and to establish the preferences and rights
of any preferred or other class or series of capital stock to be issued. At
September 28, 1998, 100 shares of Host REIT Common Stock were issued and
outstanding.
 
HOST REIT COMMON STOCK
 
  Subject to the preferential rights of any other classes or series of capital
stock and to the provisions of the Host REIT Charter regarding restrictions on
transfers of stock, holders of Host REIT Common Stock are entitled to receive
distributions if, as and when authorized and declared by the Board of
Directors, out of assets legally available therefor and to share ratably in
the assets of Host REIT legally available for distribution to its stockholders
in the event of its liquidation, dissolution or winding-up after payment of,
or adequate provision for, all known debts and liabilities of Host REIT. Host
REIT currently intends to pay regular quarterly distributions.
 
  Subject to the provisions of the Host REIT Charter regarding restrictions on
the transfer of shares of capital stock, each outstanding share of Host REIT
Common Stock entitles the holder to one vote on all matters submitted to a
vote of stockholders, including the election of directors, and, except as
provided with respect to any other class or series of shares of Host REIT
Capital Stock, the holders of shares of Host REIT Common Stock will possess
the exclusive voting power. There is no cumulative voting in the election of
directors, which means that the holders of a majority of the outstanding Host
REIT Common Stock can elect all of the directors then standing for election.
 
  Holders of shares of Host REIT Common Stock have no preferences, conversion,
sinking fund, redemption rights or preemptive rights to subscribe for any
securities of Host REIT. Subject to the provisions of the Host REIT Charter
regarding restrictions on transfer of capital stock, shares of Host REIT
Common Stock have equal distribution, liquidation and other rights.
 
  Under the MGCL, a Maryland corporation generally cannot dissolve, amend its
charter, merge, consolidate, effect a share exchange or transfer its assets
within the meaning of the MGCL unless approved by the Board of Directors and
by stockholders holding at least two-thirds of the shares entitled to vote on
the matter (unless a greater or lesser percentage (but not less than a
majority of all the votes entitled to be cast) is set forth in the
corporation's charter. Under the Host REIT Charter, any merger, consolidation,
share exchange or transfer of its assets must be approved (i) by the Board of
Directors in the manner provided in the MGCL and (ii) by stockholders to the
extent required under the MGCL. The Host REIT Charter generally provides for
stockholder approval of such transactions by a two-thirds vote of all the
votes entitled to be cast, except that any merger of Host REIT with or into a
trust organized for the purpose of changing Host REIT's form of organization
from a corporation to a trust will require the approval of stockholders of
Host REIT by the affirmative vote only of a majority of all the votes entitled
to be cast on the matter. In addition, under the MGCL, certain mergers may be
accomplished without a vote of stockholders. For example, no stockholder vote
is required for a merger of a subsidiary of a Maryland corporation into its
parent, provided the parent owns at least 90 percent of the subsidiary. In
addition, a merger need not be approved by stockholders of a Maryland
successor corporation if the merger does not reclassify or change the
outstanding shares or otherwise amend the charter, and the number
 
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<PAGE>
 
of shares to be issued or delivered in the merger is not more than 20 percent
of the number of its shares of the same class or series outstanding
immediately before the merger becomes effective. A share exchange need be
approved by a Maryland successor only by its Board of Directors. Any
amendments to the provisions contained in the Host REIT Charter relating to
restrictions on transferability of stock, the classified Board and fixing the
size of the Board within the range set forth in the Host REIT Charter, as well
as the provisions relating to removal of directors, the filling of Board
vacancies, the exclusive authority of the Board of Directors to amend the
Bylaws and other constituencies that may be considered by the Board of
Directors in determining the advisability of mergers, consolidations, share
exchanges, transfers of assets and other business combinations involving Host
REIT will require the approval of the Board of Directors and stockholders by
the affirmative vote of the holders of not less than two-thirds of the votes
entitled to be cast on the matter. Other amendments to the Host REIT Charter
may be effected by requisite action of the Board of Directors and approval by
stockholders by the affirmative vote of not less than a majority of the votes
entitled to be cast on the matter.
 
  The Host REIT Charter will authorize the Board of Directors to reclassify
any unissued shares of Host REIT Common Stock into other classes or series of
capital stock, including preferred stock, and to establish the number of
shares in each class or series and to set the preferences, conversion and
other rights, voting powers, restrictions, limitations as to dividends or
other distributions, qualifications or terms or conditions of redemption for
each such class or series.
 
PREFERRED STOCK
 
  The Host REIT Charter initially will authorize the Board of Directors to
issue 50 million shares of Host REIT Preferred Stock and to classify or
reclassify any unissued preferred shares into one or more classes or series of
capital stock, including Host REIT Common Stock. Prior to issuance of shares
of any class or series of stock other than Host REIT Common Stock, the Board
of Directors is required, under the MGCL, to set, subject to the provisions of
the Host REIT Charter regarding the restriction on transfer of capital stock,
the terms, preferences, conversion or other rights, voting powers,
restrictions, limitations as to dividends or other distributions,
qualifications and terms or conditions of redemption for each such class or
series. Thus, the Board of Directors could authorize the issuance of preferred
shares or other capital stock with terms and conditions which could have the
effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a transaction or a change in
control of Host REIT that might involve a premium price for holders of shares
of Host REIT Common Stock or otherwise be in their best interest. As of the
date hereof, no shares other than Host REIT Common Stock are outstanding, but
Host REIT may issue preferred shares or other capital stock in the future,
including as a result of the issuance of preferred stock by Host prior to the
REIT Conversion. Although the Board of Directors has no intention at the
present time of doing so (other than in connection with the proposed
Stockholders Rights Plan), it could authorize Host REIT to issue a class or
series of shares that could, depending upon the terms of such class or series,
delay, defer or prevent a transaction or a change in control of Host REIT that
might involve a premium price for holders of shares of Host REIT Common Stock
or otherwise be in their best interest.
 
POWER TO ISSUE ADDITIONAL HOST REIT COMMON STOCK AND PREFERRED STOCK
 
  Host REIT believes that the power of the Board of Directors to issue
additional authorized but unissued shares of Host REIT Common Stock or Host
REIT Preferred Stock and to classify or reclassify unissued Host REIT Common
Stock or Host REIT Preferred Stock and thereafter to cause Host REIT to issue
such classified or reclassified shares of capital stock in one or more classes
or series will provide Host REIT with increased flexibility in structuring
possible future financings and acquisitions and in meeting other needs which
might arise. The additional classes or series, as well as the Host REIT Common
Stock, will be available for issuance without further action by Host REIT's
stockholders, unless such action is required by applicable law or the rules of
any stock exchange or automated quotation system on which Host REIT's
securities may be listed or traded.
 
RESTRICTIONS ON OWNERSHIP AND TRANSFER
 
  For Host REIT to qualify as a REIT under the Code, no more than 50% in value
of its outstanding shares of stock may be owned, actually or constructively,
by five or fewer individuals (as defined in the Code to include certain
entities) during the last half of a taxable year (other than the first year
for which an election to be treated
 
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<PAGE>
 
as a REIT has been made) or during a proportionate part of a shorter taxable
year. In addition, if Host REIT, or one or more owners (actually or
constructively) of 10% or more of Host REIT, actually or constructively owns
10% or more of a tenant of Host REIT (or a tenant of any partnership in which
Host REIT is a partner), the rent received by Host REIT (either directly or
through any such partnership) from such tenant will not be qualifying income
for purposes of the REIT gross income tests of the Code. A REIT's shares also
must be beneficially owned by 100 or more persons during at least 335 days of
a taxable year of twelve months or during a proportionate part of a shorter
taxable year (other than the first year for which an election to be treated as
a REIT has been made).
 
  Primarily to satisfy certain requirements of the Code applicable to REITs
generally, the Ownership Limit under the Host REIT Charter, subject to certain
exceptions, provides that no person or persons acting as a group may own, or
be deemed to own by virtue of the attribution provisions of the Code, more
than (i) 9.8% of the lesser of the number or value of shares of Host REIT
Common Stock outstanding or (ii) 9.8% of the lesser of the number or value of
the issued and outstanding preferred or other shares of any class or series of
Host REIT stock, subject to (a) an exception for a holder of shares of Host
REIT Common Stock solely by reason of the Merger so long as such holder would
not own, directly or by attribution under the Code, more than 9.8% by value of
the outstanding capital stock of Host REIT after the Merger, and (b) a
limitation on the application of the "group" limitation (but no other element
of the Ownership Limit) to any "group" that otherwise would exceed the
Ownership Limit at the Ownership Limit Effective Time solely by reason of its
status as a "group." The Ownership Limit prohibits Marriott International and
its subsidiaries and affiliates (including members of the Marriott family)
from collectively owning capital stock in excess of the Ownership Limit, but
Host REIT's Board of Directors intends to grant an exception (pursuant to the
applicable provisions of the Host REIT Charter) that would permit Marriott
International to exercise its right to purchase up to 20% of each class of
Host REIT's voting stock in connection with a change in control of Host REIT
(but only in the event that (i) Marriott International and its subsidiaries
and affiliates (including members of the Marriott family) do not own at such
time or thereafter, directly and by attribution, 10% or more of Crestline or
any of the Lessees and (ii) such ownership of Host REIT shares would not cause
the Operating Partnership to be considered to own, directly or by attribution,
10% or more of Crestline or any of the Lessees). See "Certain Relationships
and Related Transactions--Relationship Between Host and Marriott
International." The ownership attribution rules under the Code are complex and
may cause Host REIT Common Stock owned actually or constructively by a group
of related individuals and/or entities to be owned constructively by one
individual or entity. As a result, the acquisition of less than 9.8% of the
Host REIT Common Stock (or the acquisition or ownership of an interest in an
entity that owns, actually or constructively, Host REIT Common Stock) by an
individual or entity, could, nevertheless cause that individual or entity, or
another individual or entity, to own constructively in excess of 9.8% of the
outstanding Host REIT Common Stock and thus subject such Host REIT Common
Stock to the Ownership Limit. The Board of Directors may grant an exemption
from the Ownership Limit with respect to one or more persons who would not be
treated as "individuals" for purposes of the Code if it is satisfied, based
upon an opinion of counsel and such other evidence as is satisfactory to the
Board of Directors in its sole discretion, that such ownership will not cause
a person who is an individual to be treated as owning Host REIT Common Stock
in excess of the Ownership Limit, applying the applicable constructive
ownership rules, and will not otherwise jeopardize Host REIT's status as a
REIT (for example, by causing any tenant of the Operating Partnership or the
Partnerships (including but not limited to Crestline and the Lessees) to be
considered a "related party tenant" for purposes of the REIT qualification
rules). As a condition of such waiver, the Board of Directors may require
undertakings or representations from the applicant with respect to preserving
the REIT status of Host REIT. PURSUANT TO THE TERMS OF THE HOST REIT CHARTER,
THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT WILL BECOME EFFECTIVE TO ALL HOST REIT STOCKHOLDERS AS OF
THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT EFFECTIVE TIME (SUBJECT TO THE LIMITED EXCEPTIONS
DESCRIBED ABOVE).
 
  The Board of Directors of Host REIT will have the authority to increase the
Ownership Limit from time to time, but does not have the authority to do so to
the extent that after giving effect to such increase, five beneficial owners
of Host REIT Common Stock could beneficially own in the aggregate more than
49.5% of the outstanding Host REIT Common Stock.
 
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<PAGE>
 
  The Host REIT Charter further prohibits (i) any person from actually or
constructively owning shares of beneficial interest of Host REIT that would
result in Host REIT being "closely held" under Section 856(h) of the Code or
otherwise cause Host REIT to fail to qualify as a REIT and (ii) any person
from transferring shares of Host REIT capital stock if such transfer would
result in shares Host REIT capital stock being owned by fewer than 100
persons.
 
  Any person who acquires or attempts or intends to acquire actual or
constructive ownership of shares of Host REIT capital stock that will or may
violate any of the foregoing restrictions on transferability and ownership is
required to give notice immediately to Host REIT and provide Host REIT with
such other information as Host REIT may request in order to determine the
effect of such transfer on Host REIT's status as a REIT.
 
  If any purported transfer of shares of Host REIT capital stock or any other
event would otherwise result in any person violating the Ownership Limit or
the other restrictions in the Host REIT Charter, then any such purported
transfer will be void and of no force or effect with respect to the purported
transferee (the "Prohibited Transferee") as to that number of shares that
exceeds the Ownership Limit (referred to as "excess shares") and the
Prohibited Transferee shall acquire no right or interest (or, in the case of
any event other than a purported transfer, the person or entity holding record
title to any such shares in excess of the Ownership Limit (the "Prohibited
Owner") shall cease to own any right or interest) in such excess shares. Any
such excess shares described above will be transferred automatically, by
operation of law, to a trust, the beneficiary of which will be a qualified
charitable organization selected by Host REIT (the "Beneficiary"). Such
automatic transfer shall be deemed to be effective as of the close of business
on the Business Day (as defined in the Host REIT Charter) prior to the date of
such violating transfer. Within 20 days of receiving notice from Host REIT of
the transfer of shares to the trust, the trustee of the trust (who shall be
designated by Host REIT and be unaffiliated with Host REIT and any Prohibited
Transferee or Prohibited Owner) will be required to sell such excess shares to
a person or entity who could own such shares without violating the Ownership
Limit, and distribute to the Prohibited Transferee an amount equal to the
lesser of the price paid by the Prohibited Transferee for such excess shares
or the sales proceeds received by the trust for such excess shares. In the
case of any excess shares resulting from any event other than a transfer, or
from a transfer for no consideration (such as a gift), the trustee will be
required to sell such excess shares to a qualified person or entity and
distribute to the Prohibited Owner an amount equal to the lesser of the fair
market value of such excess shares as of the date of such event or the sales
proceeds received by the trust for such excess shares. In either case, any
proceeds in excess of the amount distributable to the Prohibited Transferee or
Prohibited Owner, as applicable, will be distributed to the Beneficiary. Prior
to a sale of any such excess shares by the trust, the trustee will be entitled
to receive, in trust for the Beneficiary, all dividends and other
distributions paid by Host REIT with respect to such excess shares, and also
will be entitled to exercise all voting rights with respect to such excess
shares. Subject to Maryland law, effective as of the date that such shares
have been transferred to the trust, the trustee shall have the authority (at
the trustee's sole discretion and subject to applicable law) (i) to rescind as
void any vote cast by a Prohibited Transferee prior to the discovery by Host
REIT that such shares have been transferred to the trust and (ii) to recast
such vote in accordance with the desires of the trustee acting for the benefit
of the Beneficiary. However, if Host REIT has already taken irreversible
corporate action, then the trustee shall not have the authority to rescind and
recast such vote. Any dividend or other distribution paid to the Prohibited
Transferee or Prohibited Owner (prior to the discovery by Host REIT that such
shares had been automatically transferred to a trust as described above) will
be required to be repaid to the trustee upon demand for distribution to the
Beneficiary. If the transfer to the trust as described above is not
automatically effective (for any reason) to prevent violation of the Ownership
Limit, then the Host REIT Charter provides that the transfer of the excess
shares will be void.
 
  In addition, shares of Host REIT stock held in the trust shall be deemed to
have been offered for sale to Host REIT, or its designee, at a price per share
equal to the lesser of (i) the price per share in the transaction that
resulted in such transfer to the trust (or, in the case of a devise or gift,
the market value at the time of such devise or gift) and (ii) the market value
of such shares on the date Host REIT, or its designee, accepts such offer.
Host REIT will have the right to accept such offer until the trustee has sold
the shares held in the trust. Upon such a sale to Host REIT, the interest of
the Beneficiary in the shares sold will terminate and the trustee will
distribute the net proceeds of the sale to the Prohibited Owner.
 
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  TO AVOID THE ADVERSE EFFECTS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT, ANY HOLDER OF HOST
COMMON STOCK WHO WOULD OWN SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK IN EXCESS OF THE
OWNERSHIP LIMIT AS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT EFFECTIVE TIME SHOULD DISPOSE OF
SUCH EXCESS SHARES PRIOR TO THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT EFFECTIVE TIME. SEE "THE
RESTRUCTURING TRANSACTIONS--TERMS OF THE MERGER." ANY SHARES OF HOST REIT
COMMON STOCK HELD AS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT EFFECTIVE TIME IN VIOLATION OF THE
OWNERSHIP LIMIT WILL BE TRANSFERRED AUTOMATICALLY TO A TRUST FOR THE BENEFIT
OF A DESIGNATED CHARITABLE BENEFICIARY, AND THE PERSON WHO ACQUIRED SUCH
EXCESS SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY
DISTRIBUTIONS THEREON OR TO VOTE SUCH EXCESS SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK.
IF EXCESS SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK ARE HELD AS OF THE OWNERSHIP LIMIT
EFFECTIVE TIME, THE HOLDER OF SUCH EXCESS SHARES OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK
WILL RECEIVE THE LESSER OF THE VALUE OF SUCH EXCESS SHARES AS OF THE OWNERSHIP
LIMIT EFFECTIVE TIME OR THE CASH PROCEEDS OF THE SALE OF SUCH EXCESS SHARES OF
HOST REIT COMMON STOCK BY THE TRUSTEE OF THE TRUST.
 
  The foregoing restrictions on transferability and ownership will not apply
if the Board of Directors determines that it is no longer in the best
interests of Host REIT to attempt to qualify, or to continue to qualify, as a
REIT.
 
  All certificates representing shares of Host REIT capital stock will bear a
legend referring to the restrictions described above.
 
  All persons who own, directly or by virtue of the attribution provisions of
the Code, more than 5% (or such other percentage between 1/2 of 1% and 5% as
provided in the rules and regulations promulgated under the Code) of the
lesser of the number or value of the outstanding shares of Host REIT stock
must give a written notice to the Company within 30 days after the end of each
taxable year. In addition, each stockholder will, upon demand, be required to
disclose to Host REIT in writing such information with respect to the direct,
indirect and constructive ownership of shares of Host REIT stock as the Board
of Directors deems reasonably necessary to comply with the provisions of the
Code applicable to a REIT, to comply with the requirements of any taxing
authority or governmental agency or to determine any such compliance.
 
  These ownership limitations could have the effect of delaying, deferring or
preventing a takeover or other transaction in which holders of some, or a
majority, of Host REIT Common Stock might receive a premium for their Host
REIT Common Stock over the then prevailing market price or which such holders
might believe to be otherwise in their best interest.
 
TRANSFER AGENT AND REGISTRAR
 
  The transfer agent and registrar for Host REIT Common Stock will be First
Chicago Trust Company of New York.
 
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                    CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF MARYLAND LAW AND
                       THE HOST REIT CHARTER AND BYLAWS
 
  The following summary of certain provisions of Maryland law and of the Host
REIT Charter and Host REIT Bylaws does not purport to be complete and is
subject to and qualified in its entirety by reference to Maryland law and the
forms of the Host REIT Charter and Host REIT Bylaws to be effective upon
completion of the Merger copies of which are attached as Exhibits A and B,
respectively, to the Agreement attached to this Proxy Statement/Prospectus as
Appendix A.
 
  The Host REIT Charter and Host REIT Bylaws will contain certain provisions
that could make more difficult an acquisition or change in control of the
Company by means of a tender offer, a proxy contest or otherwise. These
provisions are expected to discourage certain types of coercive takeover
practices and inadequate takeover bids and to encourage persons seeking to
acquire control of Host REIT to negotiate first with the Board of Directors.
Host REIT believes that the benefits of these provisions outweigh the
potential disadvantages of discouraging such proposals because, among other
things, negotiation of such proposals might result in an improvement of their
terms. See also "--Anti-Takeover Effect of Certain Provisions of Maryland Law
and the Host REIT Charter and Bylaws."
 
NUMBER OF DIRECTORS; CLASSIFICATION AND REMOVAL OF BOARD OF DIRECTORS; OTHER
PROVISIONS
 
  The Host REIT Charter will provide that the Board of Directors initially
will consist of eight members and may thereafter be increased or decreased in
accordance with the Host REIT Bylaws, provided that the total number of
directors may not be fewer than three nor more than thirteen. Pursuant to the
Host REIT Bylaws, the number of directors shall be fixed by the Board of
Directors within the limits set forth in the Host REIT Charter. Further, the
Host REIT Charter will provide that the Board of Directors will be divided
into three classes of directors, with each class to consist as nearly as
possible of an equal number of directors. The term of office of the first
class of directors will expire at the 1999 annual meeting of stockholders; the
term of the second class of directors will expire at the 2000 annual meeting
of stockholders; and the term of the third class of directors will expire at
the 2001 annual meeting of stockholders. At each annual meeting of
stockholders, the class of directors to be elected at such meeting will be
elected for a three-year term, and the directors in the other two classes will
continue in office. Because stockholders will have no right to cumulative
voting for the election of directors, at each annual meeting of stockholders
the holders of a majority of the outstanding Host REIT Common Stock will be
able to elect all of the successors to the class of directors whose term
expires at that meeting.
 
  The Host REIT Charter also will provide that, except for any directors who
may be elected by holders of a class or series of capital stock other than the
Host REIT Common Stock, directors may be removed only for cause only by the
affirmative vote of stockholders holding at least two-thirds of all the votes
entitled to be cast for the election of directors. Vacancies on the Board of
Directors may be filled by the concurring vote of a majority of the remaining
directors and, in the case of a vacancy resulting from the removal of a
director by the stockholders, by the stockholders by at least two-thirds of
all the votes entitled to be cast in the election of directors. Under Maryland
law, directors may fill any vacancy only until the next annual meeting of
stockholders. A vote of stockholders holding at least two-thirds of all the
votes entitled to be cast thereon is required to amend, alter, change, repeal
or adopt any provisions inconsistent with the foregoing classified board and
director removal provisions. These provisions may make it more difficult and
time-consuming to change majority control of the Board of Directors of Host
REIT and, thus, may reduce the vulnerability of Host REIT to an unsolicited
proposal for the takeover of Host REIT or the removal of incumbent management.
 
  Because the Board of Directors will have the power, without a vote of
stockholders, to classify or reclassify any unissued shares of capital stock
and to establish the preferences and rights of any preferred or other class or
series of stock to be issued, the Board of Directors may afford the holders of
any class or series of senior stock preferences, powers and rights, voting or
otherwise, senior to the rights of holders of Host REIT Common Stock. The
issuance of any such senior shares of capital stock could have the effect of
delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of Host REIT.
 
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  See "The Restructuring Transactions--Limitation of Liability and
Indemnification of Directors and Officers" for a description of the
limitations on liability of directors and officers of Host REIT and the
provisions for indemnification of directors and officers provided for under
applicable Maryland law and the Host REIT Charter.
 
CHANGES IN CONTROL PURSUANT TO MARYLAND LAW
 
  Maryland Business Combination Law. Under the MGCL, certain "business
combinations" (including certain issuances of equity securities) between a
Maryland corporation and any Interested Stockholder or an affiliate of the
Interested Stockholder, are prohibited for five years after the most recent
date on which the Interested Stockholder becomes an Interested Stockholder.
Thereafter, any such business combination must be approved by two super-
majority stockholder votes unless, among other conditions, the corporation's
common stockholders receive a minimum price (as defined in the MGCL) for their
shares and the consideration is received in cash or in the same form as
previously paid by the Interested Stockholder for its shares. The Board of
Directors of Host REIT has not opted out of the business combination
provisions of the MGCL. Consequently, the five-year prohibition and the super-
majority vote requirements will apply to a business combination involving Host
REIT; however, as permitted by the MGCL, Host REIT's Board of Directors may
elect to opt out of these provisions in the future.
 
  Maryland Control Share Acquisition Law. Under the MGCL, "control shares"
acquired in a "control share acquisition" have no voting rights except to the
extent approved by a vote of two-thirds of the votes entitled to be cast on
the matter, excluding shares owned by the acquiror, by officers or by
directors who are employees of the corporation. "Control shares" are voting
shares which, if aggregated with all other such shares previously acquired by
the acquiror or in respect of which the acquiror is able to exercise or direct
the exercise of voting power (except solely by virtue of a revocable proxy),
would entitle the acquiror to exercise voting power in electing directors
within one of the following ranges of voting power: (i) one-fifth or more but
less than one-third, (ii) one-third or more but less than a majority or (iii)
a majority or more of all voting power. Control shares do not include shares
the acquiring person is then entitled to vote as a result of having previously
obtained stockholder approval. A "control share acquisition" means the
acquisition of control shares, subject to certain exceptions.
 
  A person who has made or proposes to make a control share acquisition, upon
satisfaction of certain conditions (including an undertaking to pay expenses),
may compel the board of directors of the corporation to call a special meeting
of stockholders to be held within 50 days of demand to consider the voting
rights of the shares. If no request for a meeting is made, the corporation may
itself present the question at any stockholders meeting.
 
  If voting rights are not approved at the meeting or if the acquiring person
does not deliver an acquiring person statement as required by the statute,
then, subject to certain conditions and limitations, the corporation may
redeem any or all of the control shares (except those for which voting rights
have previously been approved) for fair value determined, without regard to
the absence of voting rights for the control shares, as of the date of the
last control share acquisition by the acquiror or of any meeting of
stockholders at which the voting rights of such shares are considered and not
approved. If voting rights for control shares are approved at a stockholders
meeting and the acquiror becomes entitled to vote a majority of the shares
entitled to vote, all other stockholders may exercise appraisal rights. The
fair value of the shares as determined for purposes of such appraisal rights
may not be less than the highest price per share paid by the acquiror in the
control share acquisition.
 
  The control share acquisition does not apply to (a) shares acquired in a
merger, consolidation or share exchange if the corporation is a party to the
transaction or (b) acquisitions approved or exempted by the charter or bylaws
of the corporation. The Board of Directors of Host REIT has not opted out of
the control share provisions of the MGCL but, as permitted by the MGCL, may
elect to opt out of these provisions in the future.
 
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ADVANCE NOTICE OF DIRECTOR NOMINATIONS AND NEW BUSINESS
 
  The Host REIT Bylaws provide that (i) with respect to an annual meeting of
stockholders, nominations of persons for election to the Board of Directors
and the proposal of business to be considered by stockholders may be made only
(A) pursuant to Host REIT's notice of meeting, (B) by the Board of Directors
or (C) by a stockholder who is entitled to vote at the meeting and has
complied with the advance notice procedures set forth in the Host REIT Bylaws
and (ii) with respect to special meetings of the stockholders, only the
business specified in Host REIT's notice of meeting may be brought before the
meeting of stockholders and nominations of persons for election to the Board
of Directors may be made only (X) pursuant to Host REIT's notice of the
meeting, (Y) by the Board of Directors or (Z) provided that the Board of
Directors has determined that directors shall be elected at such meeting, by a
stockholder who is entitled to vote at the meeting and has complied with the
advance notice provisions set forth in the Host REIT Bylaws. The advance
notice provisions contained in the Host REIT Bylaws generally require
nominations and new business proposals by stockholders to be delivered to the
Secretary of Host REIT not later than the close of business on the 60th day
nor earlier than the close of business on the 90th day prior to the first
anniversary of the preceding year's annual meeting.
 
MEETINGS OF STOCKHOLDERS; CALL OF SPECIAL MEETINGS; STOCKHOLDER ACTION IN LIEU
OF MEETING BY UNANIMOUS CONSENT
 
  The Host REIT Bylaws provide that annual meetings of stockholders shall be
held on a date and at the time set by the Board of Directors during the month
of May each year (commencing in May 1999). Special meetings of the
stockholders may be called by the President or the Board of Directors. The
Secretary of Host REIT also is required to call a special meeting of the
stockholders on the written request of stockholders entitled to cast a
majority of all the votes entitled to be cast at the meeting. Pursuant to the
MGCL and the Host REIT Bylaws, any action required or permitted to be taken by
the stockholders must be effected at a duly called annual or special meeting
of stockholders and may not be effected by any consent in writing by
stockholders, unless such consent is unanimous.
 
MERGER, CONSOLIDATION, SHARE EXCHANGE AND TRANSFER OF ASSETS OF HOST REIT
 
  Pursuant to the Host REIT Charter, subject to the terms of any class or
series of stock at the time outstanding, Host REIT may merge with or into
another entity, may consolidate with one or more other entities, may
participate in a share exchange or may transfer its assets within the meaning
of the MGCL, but any such merger, consolidation, share exchange or transfer of
assets must be approved (i) by the Board of Directors in the manner provided
in the MGCL and (ii) by stockholders to the extent required under the MGCL. In
general, such transactions by a Maryland corporation, such as Host REIT, must
first be approved by a majority of the entire Board of Directors and
thereafter approved by stockholders by the affirmative vote of two-thirds of
all the votes entitled to be cast on the matter (unless the charter provides
for a greater or lesser stockholder vote but not less than a majority of the
number of votes entitled to be cast on the matter). The Host REIT Charter
generally provides for stockholder approval of such transactions by a two-
thirds vote of all votes entitled to be cast, except that any merger of Host
REIT with or into a trust organized for the purpose of changing Host REIT's
form of organization from a corporation to a trust will require the approval
of stockholders of Host REIT by the affirmative vote only of a majority of all
the votes entitled to be cast on the matter. Under the MGCL, certain mergers
may be accomplished without a vote of stockholders. For example, no
stockholder vote is required for a merger of a subsidiary of a Maryland
corporation into its parent, provided the parent owns at least 90 percent of
the subsidiary. In addition, a merger need not be approved by stockholders of
a Maryland successor corporation if the merger does not reclassify or change
the outstanding shares or otherwise amend the charter, and the number of
shares to be issued or delivered in the merger is not more than 20 percent of
the number of its shares of the same class or series outstanding immediately
before the merger becomes effective. A share exchange need be approved by a
Maryland successor only by its Board of Directors. Under the MGCL, a "transfer
of assets" is defined to mean any sale, lease, exchange or other transfer of
all or substantially all of the assets of the corporation but does not include
(i) a transfer of assets by a corporation in the ordinary course of business
actually conducted by it, (ii) a mortgage, pledge or creation of any other
security interest in any or all of the
 
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assets of the corporation, whether or not in the ordinary course of its
business, (iii) an exchange of shares of stock through voluntary action under
any agreement with the stockholders, or (iv) a transfer of assets to one or
more persons if all the equity interests of the person or persons are owned,
directly or indirectly, by the corporation. Pursuant to the MGCL, a voluntary
dissolution of Host REIT also would require the affirmative vote of two-thirds
of all the votes entitled to be cast on the matter.
 
DETERMINATION OF ADVISABILITY OF MERGERS, CONSOLIDATIONS, SHARE EXCHANGES,
TRANSFERS OF ASSETS AND OTHER BUSINESS COMBINATIONS INVOLVING HOST REIT
 
  The Host REIT Charter will provide that, in determining whether a merger,
consolidation, share exchange, transfer of assets within the meaning of the
MGCL or other business combination involving Host REIT is advisable, a
director shall consider the interests of the stockholders of Host REIT and, in
his sole discretion, may consider (i) the interests of Host REIT's employees,
suppliers, creditors and customers, (ii) the economy of the nation, (iii)
community and societal interests and (iv) the long-term as well as short-term
interests of Host REIT and its stockholders, including the possibility that
such interests may be best served by the continued independence of Host REIT.
 
AMENDMENTS TO THE HOST REIT CHARTER AND BYLAWS
 
  Under the MGCL, in order to amend the charter, the board of directors first
must adopt a resolution setting forth the proposed amendment and declaring its
advisability and direct that the proposed amendment be submitted to
stockholders for their consideration either at an annual or special meeting of
stockholders. Thereafter, the proposed amendment must be approved by
stockholders by the affirmative vote of two-thirds of all the votes entitled
to be cast on the matter, unless a greater or lesser proportion of votes (but
not less than a majority of all votes entitled to be cast) is specified in the
charter. The provisions contained in the Host REIT Charter relating to
restrictions on transferability of Host REIT Common Stock, the classified
Board and fixing the size of the Board within the range set forth in the Host
REIT Charter, as well as the provisions relating to removal of directors, the
filling of Board vacancies and other constituencies that may be considered in
determining the advisability of mergers, consolidations, share exchanges and
transfers of assets and other business combinations involving Host REIT, may
be amended only by a resolution adopted by the Board of Directors and approved
at an annual or special meeting of the stockholders by the affirmative vote of
the holders of not less than two-thirds of the votes entitled to be cast on
the matter. Other amendments to the Host REIT Charter may be effected by
requisite action of the Board of Directors and approval by stockholders by the
affirmative vote of not less than a majority of the votes entitled to be cast
on the matter. As permitted under the MGCL, the Host REIT Bylaws provide that
directors have the exclusive right to amend the Host REIT Bylaws.
 
ANTI-TAKEOVER EFFECT OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF MARYLAND LAW AND THE HOST REIT
CHARTER AND BYLAWS
 
  The business combination and control share provisions of the MGCL, the
provisions of the Host REIT Charter on the classification of the Board of
Directors, fixing the size of the Board of Directors within a specified range
and removal of directors, the provisions authorizing the Board of Directors,
without a vote of stockholders, to classify or reclassify any unissued shares
of stock into one or more classes or series of stock, the provisions relating
to mergers, consolidations, share exchanges and transfers of assets, the
provisions for amending certain provisions of the Host REIT Charter and for
amending the Host REIT Bylaws, the advance notice provisions of the Host REIT
Bylaws and the limitations on the ability of stockholders to call special
meetings could delay, defer or prevent a transaction or a change of control of
Host REIT that might involve a premium price for holders of Host REIT Common
Stock or otherwise be in their best interests. The stock transfer restrictions
that will be contained in the Host REIT Charter, which are intended to help
Host REIT satisfy certain requirements under the Code to qualify as a REIT for
federal income tax purposes, could also delay, defer or prevent a transaction
or a change of control of Host REIT that might involve a premium price for
holders of Host REIT Common Stock or otherwise be in their best interests.
 
MARRIOTT INTERNATIONAL PURCHASE RIGHT
 
  In connection with Host's spin-off of Marriott International in 1993,
Marriott International obtained the Marriott International Purchase Right,
which entitles Marriott to purchase up to 20% of each class of Host's
 
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outstanding voting shares at the then fair market value upon the occurrence of
certain change of control events involving Host. The Marriott International
Purchase Right will continue in effect after the Merger (until June 2017),
subject to certain limitations intended to help protect the REIT status of
Host REIT. The Marriott International Purchase Right may have the effect of
discouraging a takeover of Host REIT because any person considering acquiring
a substantial or controlling block of Host REIT Common Stock will face the
possibility that its ability to obtain or exercise control would be impaired
or made more expensive by the exercise of the Marriott International Purchase
Right.
 
STOCKHOLDER RIGHTS PLAN
 
  Host currently has in effect a stockholder rights plan pursuant to the Host
Rights Agreement, and it has preferred stock purchase rights attached to its
common stock pursuant to such rights plan. Prior to the completion of the
Merger, the Board of Directors intends to adopt a Stockholder Rights Plan
pursuant to a rights agreement (the "Host REIT Rights Agreement") to replace
the existing Host plan and declare a dividend of one preferred stock purchase
right (a "Host REIT Right") for each outstanding share of Host REIT Common
Stock. All shares of Host REIT Common Stock issued by Host REIT between the
date of adoption of the Stockholder Rights Plan and the Rights Distribution
Date (as defined below), or the date, if any, on which the Host REIT Rights
are redeemed would have Host REIT Rights attached to them. It is expected that
the Host REIT Rights will expire ten years after adoption of the Stockholder
Rights Plan, unless earlier redeemed or exchanged. Each Host REIT Right, when
exercisable, would entitle the holder to purchase a fraction of a share of a
newly created series of junior participating preferred stock. Until a Host
REIT Right is exercised, the holder thereof, as such, would have no rights as
a stockholder of Host REIT including, without limitation, the right to vote or
to receive dividends.
 
  The Host REIT Rights Agreement is expected to provide that the Host REIT
Rights initially attach to all certificates representing Host REIT Common
Stock then outstanding. The Host REIT Rights would separate from the Host REIT
Common Stock and a distribution of Host REIT Rights certificates would occur
(a "Rights Distribution Date") upon the earlier to occur of (i) ten days
following a public announcement that a person or group of affiliated or
associated persons (an "Acquiring Person") has acquired, or obtained the right
to acquire, beneficial ownership of 20% or more of the outstanding Host REIT
Common Stock (the "Stock Acquisition Date") or (ii) ten business days (or such
later date as the Board of Directors may determine) following the commencement
of a tender offer or exchange offer, the consummation of which would result in
the beneficial ownership by a person of 20% or more of the outstanding Host
REIT Common Stock. Until the Rights Distribution Date, the Host REIT Rights
would be evidenced by the Host REIT Common Stock certificates, and would be
transferred with, and only with, the Host REIT Common Stock certificates.
 
  It is expected that, if a Person becomes the beneficial owner of 20% or more
of the then outstanding Host REIT Common Stock (except pursuant to an offer
for all outstanding Host REIT Common Stock which the Outside Directors
determine to be fair to and otherwise in the best interests of Host REIT and
its stockholders), each holder of a Host REIT Right would, after the end of a
redemption period, have the right (subject to the Ownership Limit and the
other ownership restrictions contained in the Host REIT Charter) to exercise
the Host REIT Right by purchasing shares of Host REIT Common Stock (or, in
certain circumstances, cash, property or other securities of Host REIT) having
a value equal to two times such amount.
 
  If at any time following the Stock Acquisition Date, (i) Host REIT is
acquired in a merger or other business combination transaction in which it is
not the surviving corporation (other than a merger which follows an offer
described in the preceding paragraph) or (ii) 50% or more of Host REIT's
assets or earning power is sold or transferred, each holder of a Host REIT
Right would have the right to receive, upon exercise, common shares of the
acquiring company having a value equal to two times the purchase price of the
Host REIT Right, subject to the Ownership Limit and the other ownership
restrictions contained in the Host REIT Charter.
 
  In general, the Board of Directors of Host REIT may redeem the Host REIT
Rights at a nominal price per Host REIT Right at any time until ten days after
an Acquiring Person has been identified as such. If the decision
 
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to redeem the Host REIT Rights occurs after a person becomes an Acquiring
Person, the decision will require the concurrence of a majority of the
Continuing Directors, defined as any member of the Board of Directors who was
a member of the Board of Directors prior to the date of the Host REIT Rights
Agreement, and any person who is subsequently elected to the Board if such
person is recommended or approved by a majority of the Continuing Directors.
The term "Outside Directors" means "Continuing Directors" who are not officers
of Host REIT.
 
  The Host REIT Rights would have certain anti-takeover effects. The Host REIT
Rights would cause substantial dilution to a person or group that attempts to
acquire Host REIT. The Host REIT Rights, however, would not interfere with any
merger or other business combination approved by the Board of Directors since
the Board may, at its option, at any time prior to any person becoming an
Acquiring Person, redeem all rights or amend the Host REIT Rights Agreement to
exempt the person from the Host REIT Rights Agreement.
 
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             DESCRIPTION OF THE PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT AND OP UNITS
 
  The following is a summary of the material terms of the Partnership
Agreement and the OP Units to be issued in connection with the Partnership
Mergers and the REIT Conversion. Following the REIT Conversion, OP Units will
be owned by the following groups: Host REIT; the Blackstone Entities; the
Limited Partners who participate in the Partnership Mergers; and partners in
the Private Partnerships who have agreed to exchange their interests in the
Private Partnerships for OP Units. Following the REIT Conversion, Host REIT
will be the sole general partner of the Operating Partnership, and following
consummation of the other transactions comprising the REIT Conversion, the
Operating Partnership will carry on the business formerly conducted by Host.
See "The REIT Conversion."
 
GENERAL
 
  Holders of OP Units (other than Host REIT in its capacity as general
partner) will hold a limited partnership interest in the Operating
Partnership, and all holders of OP Units (including Host REIT in its capacity
as general partner) will be entitled to share in cash distributions from, and
in the profits and losses of, the Operating Partnership. Because Host REIT
will hold a number of OP Units equal to the number of shares of Host REIT
Common Stock outstanding, each OP Unit generally will receive distributions in
the same amount paid on each share of Host REIT Common Stock. See
"Distribution and Other Policies--Distribution Policy."
 
  Holders of OP Units will have the rights to which limited partners are
entitled under the Partnership Agreement and the Delaware Revised Uniform
Limited Partnership Act (the "Delaware Act"). The OP Units will not be listed
on any exchange or quoted on any national market system. The Partnership
Agreement imposes certain restrictions on the transfer of OP Units, as
described below.
 
FORMATION
 
  The Operating Partnership was formed as a Delaware limited partnership under
the Delaware Act on April 15, 1998. Upon the consummation of the REIT
Conversion, Host REIT will be admitted to the Operating Partnership as the
sole general partner of the Operating Partnership. Following the REIT
Conversion, Host REIT is expected to hold a substantial amount of the
interests in the Operating Partnership. Of the interests in the Operating
Partnership allocated to Host REIT, a 0.1% interest in the Operating
Partnership will be held by Host REIT as the general partner of the Operating
Partnership, and the remaining OP Units allocated to Host REIT will be held by
Host REIT as a limited partner in the Operating Partnership.
 
PURPOSES, BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT
 
  The purpose of the Operating Partnership includes the conduct of any
business that may be lawfully conducted by a limited partnership formed under
the Delaware Act, except that the Partnership Agreement requires the business
of the Operating Partnership to be conducted in such a manner that will permit
Host REIT to qualify as a REIT under Section 856 of the Code, unless Host REIT
ceases to qualify as a REIT for reasons other than the conduct of the business
of the Operating Partnership. Subject to the foregoing limitation, the
Operating Partnership may enter into partnerships, joint ventures or similar
arrangements and may own interests directly or indirectly in any other entity.
 
  Host REIT, as general partner of the Operating Partnership, has the
exclusive power and authority to conduct the business of the Operating
Partnership subject to the consent of the limited partners in certain limited
circumstances discussed below. No limited partner may take part in the
operation, management or control of the business of the Operating Partnership
by virtue of being a holder of OP Units.
 
  In particular, the limited partners expressly acknowledge in the Partnership
Agreement that Host REIT is acting on behalf of the Operating Partnership's
limited partners and Host REIT's stockholders collectively, and is under no
obligation to consider the tax consequences to limited partners when making
decisions for the benefit of the Operating Partnership. Host REIT intends to
make decisions in its capacity as general partner of the
 
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Operating Partnership so as to maximize the profitability of Host REIT and the
Operating Partnership as a whole, independent of the tax effects on the
limited partners. Host REIT and the Operating Partnership will have no
liability to a limited partner as a result of any liabilities or damages
incurred or suffered by, or benefits not derived by, a limited partner as a
result of the act or omission of Host REIT as general partner of the Operating
Partnership unless Host REIT acted, or failed to act, in bad faith and the act
or omission was material to the loss, liability or benefit not derived.
 
HOST REIT MAY NOT ENGAGE IN OTHER BUSINESSES; CONFLICTS OF INTEREST
 
  Host REIT, as general partner, may not conduct any business other than the
business of the Operating Partnership without the consent of limited partners
holding Percentage Interests that are more than 50% of the aggregate
Percentage Interests of the outstanding limited partnership interests entitled
to vote thereon, including any such interests held by Host REIT. Other persons
(including officers, directors, employees, agents and other affiliates of Host
REIT) will not be prohibited under the Partnership Agreement from engaging in
other business activities. However, Host REIT, on behalf of the Operating
Partnership, has adopted certain policies regarding noncompetition provisions
and avoidance of conflicts of interest. See "Distribution and Other Policies--
Conflicts of Interest Policies." In addition, the Partnership Agreement does
not prevent another person or entity that acquires control of Host REIT in the
future from conducting other businesses or owning other assets, even though
such businesses or assets may be ones that it would be in the best interests
of the limited partners for the Operating Partnership to own.
 
DISTRIBUTIONS; ALLOCATIONS OF INCOME AND LOSS
 
  The Partnership Agreement provides for the quarterly distribution of
Available Cash (as determined in the manner provided in the Partnership
Agreement), to Host REIT and the limited partners as holders of OP Units in
proportion to their Percentage Interests. "Available Cash" is generally
defined as net income plus depreciation and amortization and any reduction in
reserves and minus interest and principal payments on debt, capital
expenditures and any additions to reserves and other adjustments. At the time
of the REIT Conversion, neither Host REIT nor the limited partners will be
entitled to any preferential or disproportionate distributions of Available
Cash (except to the extent that Host REIT receives preferred units in the
Operating Partnership with economic rights that mirror the economic rights of
any preferred stock that Host has outstanding at the time of the REIT
Conversion).
 
BORROWING BY THE OPERATING PARTNERSHIP
 
  Host REIT is authorized to cause the Operating Partnership to borrow money
and to issue and guarantee debt as it deems necessary for the conduct of the
activities of the Operating Partnership, including financing and refinancing
the assets of the Operating Partnership. Such debt may be secured by
mortgages, deeds of trust, liens or encumbrances on properties of the
Operating Partnership. Host REIT also may cause the Operating Partnership to
borrow money to enable the Operating Partnership to make distributions,
including distributions to holders of OP Units, including Host REIT, in an
amount sufficient to permit Host REIT, as long as it qualifies as a REIT, to
avoid the payment of any federal income tax. See "Distribution and Other
Policies--Financing Policies."
 
REIMBURSEMENT OF HOST REIT; TRANSACTIONS WITH HOST REIT AND ITS AFFILIATES
 
  Host REIT will not receive any compensation for its services as general
partner of the Operating Partnership. Host REIT, however, as a partner in the
Operating Partnership, has the same right to allocations and distributions as
other partners in the Operating Partnership. In addition, the Operating
Partnership will pay all expenses relating to the Operating Partnership's
organization, the REIT Conversion, the acquisition and ownership of its assets
and its operations. The Operating Partnership will be responsible for and will
pay (or reimburse) all expenses and liabilities of any nature that Host REIT
may incur (including expenses and liabilities arising out of the REIT
Conversion and expenses related to the ongoing operations of Host REIT and to
the management and administration of any subsidiaries of Host REIT permitted
under the Partnership Agreement).
 
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The Operating Partnership also will be responsible for paying any and all
taxes incurred by Host REIT, except that the Operating Partnership will not be
responsible for any taxes that Host REIT would not have been required to pay
if it qualified as a REIT for federal income tax purposes or any taxes imposed
on Host REIT by reason of its failure to distribute to its stockholders an
amount equal to its taxable income. The Operating Partnership, however, will
not be responsible for expenses or liabilities incurred by Host REIT that are
excluded from the scope of the indemnification provisions of the Partnership
Agreement.
 
  Except as expressly permitted by the Partnership Agreement, Host REIT and
its affiliates will not engage in any transactions with the Operating
Partnership, except on terms that are determined in good faith by the general
partner to be fair and reasonable and no less favorable to the Operating
Partnership than would be obtained from an unaffiliated third party.
 
LIABILITY OF HOST REIT AND LIMITED PARTNERS
 
  Host REIT, as general partner of the Operating Partnership, will be liable
for all general recourse obligations of the Operating Partnership to the
extent not paid by the Operating Partnership. Host REIT will not be liable for
the nonrecourse obligations of the Operating Partnership.
 
  The limited partners of the Operating Partnership will not be required to
make additional capital contributions to the Operating Partnership. Assuming
that a limited partner does not take part in the control of the business of
the Operating Partnership and otherwise acts in conformity with the provisions
of the Partnership Agreement, the liability of a limited partner for
obligations of the Operating Partnership under the Partnership Agreement and
the Delaware Act will be limited, subject to certain exceptions, generally to
the loss of such limited partner's investment in the Operating Partnership
represented by his OP Units. Under the Delaware Act, a limited partner may not
receive a distribution from the Operating Partnership if, at the time of the
distribution and after giving effect thereto, the liabilities of the Operating
Partnership, other than liabilities to parties on account of their interests
in the Operating Partnership and liabilities for which recourse is limited to
specified property of the Operating Partnership, exceed the fair value of the
Operating Partnership's assets, other than the fair value of any property
subject to nonrecourse liabilities of the Operating Partnership, but only to
the extent of such liabilities. The Delaware Act provides that a limited
partner who receives a distribution knowing at the time that it violates the
foregoing prohibition is liable to the Operating Partnership for the amount of
the distribution. Unless otherwise agreed, such a limited partner will not be
liable for the return of such distribution after the expiration of three years
from the date of such distribution.
 
  The Operating Partnership expects to qualify to conduct business in various
states in which the conduct of its business requires such qualification.
Maintenance of limited liability may require compliance with certain legal
requirements of those jurisdictions and certain other jurisdictions.
Limitations on the liability of a limited partner for the obligations of a
limited partnership have not been clearly established in many jurisdictions.
Accordingly, if it were determined that the right, or exercise of the right by
the limited partners, to make certain amendments to the Partnership Agreement
or to take other action pursuant to the Partnership Agreement constituted
"control" of the Operating Partnership's business for the purposes of the
statutes of any relevant jurisdiction, the limited partners might be held
personally liable for the Operating Partnership's obligations. The Operating
Partnership will operate in a manner Host REIT deems reasonable, necessary and
appropriate to preserve the limited liability of the limited partners.
 
EXCULPATION AND INDEMNIFICATION OF HOST REIT
 
  The Partnership Agreement generally provides that Host REIT, as general
partner of the Operating Partnership, will incur no liability to the Operating
Partnership or any limited partner for losses sustained, liabilities incurred
or benefits not derived as a result of errors in judgment or mistakes of fact
or law or of any act or omission, unless Host REIT acted, or failed to act, in
bad faith and the act or omission was material to the loss, liability or
benefit not derived. In addition, Host REIT is not responsible for any
misconduct or negligence on the part of its agents, provided Host REIT
appointed such agents in good faith. Host REIT may consult with
 
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legal counsel, accountants, appraisers, management consultants, investment
bankers and other consultants and advisors, and any action it takes or omits
to take in reliance upon the opinion of such persons, as to matters that Host
REIT reasonably believes to be within their professional or expert competence,
shall be conclusively presumed to have been done or omitted in good faith and
in accordance with such opinion.
 
  The Partnership Agreement also provides for indemnification of Host REIT,
the directors and officers of Host REIT and such other persons as Host REIT
may from time to time designate against any judgments, penalties, fines,
settlements and reasonable expenses actually incurred by such person in
connection with the proceeding unless it is established that: (i) the act or
omission of the indemnified person was material to the matter giving rise to
the proceeding and either was committed in bad faith or was the result of
active and deliberate dishonesty; (ii) the indemnified person actually
received an improper personal benefit in money, property or services; or (iii)
in the case of any criminal proceeding, the indemnified person had reasonable
cause to believe that the act or omission was unlawful. The Operating
Partnership is obligated to advance to an indemnified person reasonable
expenses incurred or expected to be incurred by such indemnified person if
such indemnified person certifies to the Operating Partnership that his
conduct has met the standards for indemnification and that he will repay any
amounts received if it is determined subsequently that his conduct did not
meet such standards. To the extent that the indemnification provisions purport
to include indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act,
in the opinion of the Commission, such indemnification is contrary to public
policy and therefore unenforceable.
 
SALES OF ASSETS
 
  Under the Partnership Agreement, Host REIT generally has the exclusive
authority to determine whether, when and on what terms the assets of the
Operating Partnership (including the Hotels) will be sold. In addition, Host
REIT is not required to take into account the tax consequences to the limited
partners in deciding whether to cause the Operating Partnership to undertake a
specific transaction. A sale of all or substantially all of the assets of the
Operating Partnership (or a merger of the Operating Partnership with another
entity) requires an affirmative vote of limited partners holding Percentage
Interests that are more than 50% of the aggregate Percentage Interests of the
outstanding limited partnership interests entitled to vote thereon (including
Percentage Interests held by Host REIT).
 
REMOVAL OR WITHDRAWAL OF HOST REIT; TRANSFER OF HOST REIT'S INTERESTS
 
  The Partnership Agreement provides that the limited partners may not remove
Host REIT as general partner of the Operating Partnership with or without
cause (unless neither Host REIT nor its parent entity is a "public company,"
in which case Host REIT may be removed with or without cause by limited
partners holding Percentage Interests that are more than 50% of the aggregate
Percentage Interests of the outstanding limited partnership interests entitled
to vote thereon, including any such interests held by the general partner). In
addition, Host REIT may not transfer any of its interests as general or
limited partner of the Operating Partnership or withdraw as a general partner,
except, in each case, in connection with a merger or sale of all or
substantially all of its assets, provided that (i) the limited partners of the
Operating Partnership either will receive, or will have the right to receive,
substantially the same consideration as holders of Host REIT Common Stock,
(ii) following such merger or other consolidation, substantially all of the
assets of the surviving entity consist of OP Units and (iii) such transaction
has been approved by partners holding Percentage Interests that are more than
50% of the aggregate Percentage Interests of the outstanding interests in the
Operating Partnership entitled to vote thereon (including any such interests
held by Host REIT). Host REIT initially will hold a majority of the OP Units
and thus would control the outcome of this vote. See "--Sales of Assets."
 
  Although Host REIT cannot transfer its partnership interests except in a
transaction in which substantially all of the assets of the surviving entity
consist of OP Units, the Partnership Agreement does not prevent a transaction
in which another entity acquires control (or all of the shares of capital
stock) of Host REIT and that other entity owns assets and conducts businesses
outside of the Operating Partnership.
 
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CERTAIN VOTING RIGHTS OF HOLDERS OF OP UNITS DURING THE FIRST YEAR FOLLOWING
THE EFFECTIVE DATE OF THE PARTNERSHIP MERGERS
 
  During the first year following the effective date of the Partnership
Mergers, if a vote of the stockholders of Host REIT is required, then (i) a
sale of all or substantially all of the assets of the Operating Partnership,
(ii) a merger involving the Operating Partnership and (iii) any issuance of OP
Units in connection with an issuance of Host REIT Common Stock representing
20% or more of the outstanding Host REIT Common Stock which would require
stockholder approval under the rules of the NYSE, would require the approval
of a majority of all outstanding OP Units (or, in the case of clause (iii), a
majority of the OP Units that are voted, provided that at least a majority of
the OP Units are voted), including OP Units held by Host REIT, voting as a
single class with Host REIT voting its OP Units in the same proportion as its
stockholders vote. In addition, during the one-year period following the
effective date of the Partnership Mergers, any taxable sale or sales of Hotels
representing more than 10% of the aggregate appraised value (as determined by
an independent hotel valuation and financial advisory firm) of the Hotels
previously owned by any Partnership would require, in addition to any other
approval requirements, the approval of a majority of all outstanding OP Units
held by persons who formerly were Limited Partners of such Partnership, voting
as a separate class.
 
RESTRICTIONS ON TRANSFERS OF INTERESTS BY LIMITED PARTNERS
 
  The Partnership Agreement provides that no limited partner shall, without
the prior written consent of Host REIT (which consent may be withheld in Host
REIT's sole and absolute discretion), sell, assign, distribute or otherwise
transfer all or any portion of his interest in the Operating Partnership,
except that a limited partner may transfer, without the consent of Host REIT,
all or a portion of its limited partnership interest (i) in the case of a
limited partner who is an individual, to a member of his immediate family, any
trust formed for the benefit of himself and/or members of his immediate
family, or any partnership, limited liability company, joint venture,
corporation or other business entity comprised only of himself and/or members
of his immediate family and entities the ownership interests in which are
owned by or for the benefit of himself and/or members of his immediate family,
(ii) in the case of a limited partner which is a trust, to the beneficiaries
of such trust, (iii) in the case of a limited partner which is a partnership,
limited liability company, joint venture, corporation or other business entity
to which OP Units were transferred pursuant to (i) above, to its partners,
owners, or stockholders, as the case may be, who are members of the immediate
family of or are actually the person(s) who transferred OP Units to it
pursuant to (i) above, (iv) in the case of a limited partner which acquired OP
Units as of the closing of the Partnership Mergers and which is a partnership,
limited liability company, joint venture, corporation or other business
entity, to its partners, owners, stockholders or Affiliates thereof, as the
case may be, or the Persons owning the beneficial interests in any of its
partners, owners or stockholders or Affiliates thereof (it being understood
that this clause (iv) will apply to all of each Person's partnership interests
whether the OP Units relating thereto were acquired on the date hereof or
hereafter), (v) in the case of a limited partner which is a partnership,
limited liability company, joint venture, corporation or other business entity
other than any of the foregoing described in clause (iii) or (iv), in
accordance with the terms of any agreement between such limited partner and
the Operating Partnership pursuant to which such partnership interest was
issued, (vi) pursuant to a gift or other transfer without consideration, (vii)
pursuant to applicable laws of descent or distribution, (viii) to another
limited partner and (ix) pursuant to a grant of security interest or other
encumbrance effected in a bona fide transaction or as a result of the exercise
of remedies related thereto. All of the foregoing transfers are subject to the
provisions of the Partnership Agreement which require compliance with
securities laws, prohibit transfers affecting the tax status of the Operating
Partnership or the qualification of Host REIT as a REIT for tax purposes,
prohibit transfers to holders of nonrecourse liabilities of the Operating
Partnership and are also subject to the rules on substitution of limited
partners. In addition, Limited Partners will be permitted to dispose of their
OP Units following the first anniversary of the effective date of the
Partnership Mergers by exercising their Unit Redemption Right. See "--Unit
Redemption Right" below.
 
  The right of any permitted transferee of OP Units to become a substitute
limited partner is subject to the consent of Host REIT, which consent Host
REIT may withhold in its sole and absolute discretion. If Host REIT does not
consent to the admission of a transferee of OP Units as a substitute limited
partner, the transferee will
 
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succeed to all economic rights and benefits attributable to such OP Units
(including the Unit Redemption Right), but will not become a limited partner
or possess any other rights of limited partners (including the right to vote).
 
  Transfers of OP Units may be effected only by means of entries in the record
of the Operating Partnership, and Host REIT will require evidence satisfactory
to it of compliance with all transfer restrictions prior to recording any
transfer.
 
UNIT REDEMPTION RIGHT
 
  Subject to certain limitations, holders of OP Units (other than Host REIT)
may exercise the Unit Redemption Right by providing notice to the Operating
Partnership at any time commencing one year after the effective date of the
Partnership Mergers. Unless Host REIT elects to assume and perform the
Operating Partnership's obligation with respect to the Unit Redemption Right,
as described below, the redeeming holder of OP Units will receive cash from
the Operating Partnership in an amount equal to the market value of the OP
Units to be redeemed. The market value of an OP Unit for this purpose will be
equal to the average of the daily market price of a share of Host REIT Common
Stock on the NYSE for the ten consecutive trading days before the day on which
the redemption notice was given. The market price for each such trading day
shall be the closing price, regular way, on such day, or if no such sales take
place on such day, the average of the closing bid and asked prices on such
day. In lieu of the Operating Partnership's acquiring the OP Units for cash,
Host REIT will have the right (except as described below, if the Host REIT
Common Stock are not publicly traded) to elect to acquire the OP Units
directly from a holder of OP Units exercising the Unit Redemption Right, in
exchange for either cash or Host REIT Common Stock, and, upon such
acquisition, Host REIT will become the owner of such OP Units. In either case,
acquisition of such OP Units by Host REIT will be treated as a sale of the OP
Units to Host REIT for federal income tax purposes. Upon exercise of the Unit
Redemption Right, the right of the holder of OP Units to receive distributions
for the OP Units so redeemed or exchanged will cease. At least 1,000 OP Units
(or all remaining OP Units owned by the holder of OP Units if less than 1,000
OP Units) must be redeemed each time the Unit Redemption Right is exercised.
The redemption generally will occur on the tenth business day after notice of
the exercise of the Unit Redemption Right by a holder of OP Units is given to
the Operating Partnership, except that no redemption or exchange can occur if
delivery of Host REIT Common Stock would be prohibited either under the
provisions of the Host REIT Charter relating to restrictions on ownership and
transfer of Host REIT Common Stock or under applicable federal or state
securities laws as long as the Host REIT Common Stock are publicly traded. See
"Description of Host REIT Capital Stock--Restrictions on Ownership and
Transfer."
 
  In the event that the Host REIT Common Stock are not publicly traded but
another entity whose stock is publicly traded owns more than 50% of the shares
of capital stock of Host REIT (referred to as the "Parent Entity"), the Unit
Redemption Right will be determined by reference to the publicly traded shares
of the Parent Entity and the general partner will have the right to elect to
acquire the OP Units to be redeemed for publicly traded stock of the Parent
Entity. In the event that the Host REIT Common Stock are not publicly traded
and there is no Parent Entity with publicly traded stock, the Unit Redemption
Right would be based upon the fair market value of the Operating Partnership's
assets at the time the Unit Redemption Right is exercised (as determined in
good faith by Host REIT), and, unless otherwise agreed by the redeeming
limited partner, Host REIT and the Operating Partnership would be obligated to
satisfy the Unit Redemption Right in cash, payable on the thirtieth business
day after notice to the Operating Partnership of exercise of the Unit
Redemption Right.
 
NO WITHDRAWAL BY LIMITED PARTNERS
 
  No limited partner has the right to withdraw from or reduce his capital
contribution to the Operating Partnership, except as a result of the
redemption, exchange or transfer of OP Units pursuant to the terms of the
Partnership Agreement.
 
ISSUANCE OF LIMITED PARTNERSHIP INTERESTS
 
  Host REIT is authorized, without the consent of the limited partners, to
cause the Operating Partnership to issue additional OP Units to Host REIT, to
the limited partners or to other persons for such consideration and
 
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upon such terms and conditions as Host REIT deems appropriate. The Operating
Partnership also may issue to any of the foregoing persons or entities
partnership interests in different series or classes, which may be senior to
the OP Units, including with respect to distributions and upon liquidation. If
additional OP Units or partnership interests in different series or classes of
equity securities are issued to Host REIT, then Host REIT must issue
additional Host REIT Common Stock or securities having substantially similar
rights to such partnership interests, and must contribute the proceeds
received by Host REIT from such issuance to the Operating Partnership.
Consideration for additional partnership interests may be cash or any property
or other assets permitted by the Delaware Act. No limited partner has
preemptive, preferential or similar rights with respect to capital
contributions to the Operating Partnership or the issuance or sale of any
partnership interests therein.
 
MEETINGS; VOTING
 
  Meetings of the limited partners may be called only by Host REIT, on its own
motion or upon written request of limited partners owning at least 25% of the
then outstanding OP Units (including those held by Host REIT). Limited
partners may vote either in person or by proxy at meetings. Any action that is
required or permitted to be taken by the limited partners may be taken either
at a meeting of the limited partners or without a meeting if consents in
writing setting forth the action so taken are signed by limited partners
holding Percentage Interests which are not less than the minimum Percentage
Interest that would be necessary to authorize or take such action at a meeting
of the limited partners at which all limited partners entitled to vote on such
action were present. On matters as to which limited partners are entitled to
vote, each limited partner (including Host REIT to the extent it holds limited
partnership interests) will have a vote equal to its Percentage Interest. A
transferee of OP Units who has not been admitted as a substituted limited
partner with respect to such OP Units will have no voting rights with respect
to such OP Units, even if such transferee holds other OP Units as to which it
has been admitted as a limited partner. The Partnership Agreement does not
provide for annual meetings of the limited partners, and Host REIT does not
anticipate calling such meetings.
 
AMENDMENT OF THE PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT
 
  Amendments to the Partnership Agreement may be proposed by Host REIT or by
limited partners owning at least 25% of the then outstanding OP Units.
Generally, the Partnership Agreement may be amended with the approval of Host
REIT, as general partner, and limited partners (including Host REIT) holding
Percentage Interests that are more than 50% of the aggregate Percentage
Interests of the outstanding limited partnership interests entitled to vote
thereon. Certain provisions regarding, among other things, the rights and
duties of Host REIT as general partner (e.g., restrictions on Host REIT's
power to conduct businesses other than owning OP Units, the dissolution of the
Operating Partnership or the rights of limited partners), may not be amended
without the approval of limited partners (excluding Host REIT) holding
Percentage Interests that are more than 50% of the aggregate Percentage
Interests of the outstanding limited partnership interests entitled to vote
thereon. Notwithstanding the foregoing, Host REIT, as general partner, will
have the power, without the consent of the limited partners, to amend the
Partnership Agreement as may be required to (i) add to the obligations of Host
REIT as general partner or surrender any right or power granted to Host REIT
as general partner, (ii) reflect the admission, substitution, termination or
withdrawal of partners in accordance with the terms of the Partnership
Agreement, (iii) establish the rights, powers, duties and preferences of any
additional partnership interests issued in accordance with the terms of the
Partnership Agreement, (iv) reflect a change that does not materially
adversely affect any limited partner, or cure any ambiguity, correct or
supplement any provisions of the Partnership Agreement not inconsistent with
law or with other provisions of the Partnership Agreement, or make other
changes concerning matters under the Partnership Agreement that are not
otherwise inconsistent with the Partnership Agreement or applicable law or (v)
satisfy any requirements of federal, state or local law.
 
  Certain amendments that would, among other things, (i) convert a limited
partner's interest into a general partner's interest, (ii) modify the limited
liability of a limited partner, (iii) alter the interest of a partner in
profits or losses, or the rights to receive any distributions (except as
permitted under the Partnership Agreement with respect to the admission of new
partners or the issuance of additional OP Units (including partnership
interests in a different class or series to the extent otherwise authorized
under the Partnership Agreement), which actions
 
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<PAGE>
 
will have the effect of changing the percentage interests of the partners and
thus altering their interests in profits, losses and distributions), (iv)
amend the limited partners' right to transfer or (v) alter the Unit Redemption
Right, must be approved by Host REIT and each limited partner that would be
adversely affected by such amendment.
 
BOOKS AND REPORTS
 
  Host REIT is required to keep the Operating Partnership's books and records
at the principal office of the Operating Partnership. The books of the
Operating Partnership are required to be maintained for financial and tax
reporting purposes on an accrual basis. The limited partners will have the
right to receive copies of the most recent Commission filings by Host REIT and
the Operating Partnership, the Operating Partnership's federal, state and
local income tax returns, a list of limited partners, the Partnership
Agreement, the partnership certificate and all amendments thereto and certain
information about the capital contributions of the partners. Host REIT may
keep confidential from the limited partners any information that Host REIT
believes to be in the nature of trade secrets or other information the
disclosure of which Host REIT in good faith believes is not in the best
interests of the Operating Partnership or which the Operating Partnership is
required by law or by agreements with unaffiliated third parties to keep
confidential.
 
  Host REIT will furnish to each limited partner, no later than the date on
which Host REIT mails its annual report to its stockholders, an annual report
containing financial statements of the Operating Partnership (or Host REIT, if
it prepares consolidated financial statements including the Operating
Partnership) for each fiscal year, including a balance sheet and statements of
operations, cash flow, partners' equity and changes in financial position. The
financial statements will be audited by a nationally recognized firm of
independent public accountants selected by Host REIT. In addition, if and to
the extent that Host REIT mails quarterly reports to its stockholders, Host
REIT will furnish to each limited partner, no later than the date on which
Host REIT mails such reports to its stockholders, a report containing
unaudited financial statements of the Operating Partnership (or Host REIT, if
it prepares consolidated financial statements including the Operating
Partnership) as of the last day of the calendar quarter and such other
information as may be required by applicable law or regulation or as Host REIT
deems appropriate.
 
  Host REIT will use reasonable efforts to furnish to each limited partner,
within 90 days after the close of each taxable year, the tax information
reasonably required by the limited partners for federal and state income tax
reporting purposes.
 
POWER OF ATTORNEY
 
  Pursuant to the terms of the Partnership Agreement, each limited partner and
each assignee appoints Host REIT, any liquidator and the authorized officers
and attorneys-in-fact of each, as such limited partner's or assignee's
attorney-in-fact to do the following: execute, swear to, acknowledge, deliver,
file and record in the appropriate public offices various certificates,
documents and other instruments (including, among other things, the
Partnership Agreement and the certificate of limited partnership and all
amendments or restatements thereof) that Host REIT deems appropriate or
necessary to effectuate the terms or intent of the Partnership Agreement. The
Partnership Agreement provides that such power of attorney is irrevocable,
will survive the subsequent incapacity of any limited partner and the transfer
of all or any portion of such limited partner's or assignee's OP Units and
will extend to such limited partner's or assignee's heirs, successors, assigns
and personal representatives.
 
DISSOLUTION, WINDING UP AND TERMINATION
 
  The Operating Partnership will continue until December 31, 2098, unless
sooner dissolved and terminated. The Operating Partnership will be dissolved
prior to the expiration of its term and its affairs wound up upon the
occurrence of the earliest of: (i) the withdrawal of Host REIT as general
partner without the permitted transfer of Host REIT's interest to a successor
general partner (except in certain limited circumstances); (ii) an election to
dissolve the Operating Partnership prior to December 31, 2058 made by Host
REIT with the consent of the limited partners who hold 90% of the OP Units
(including OP Units held by Host REIT), (iii) the sale of all or
 
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<PAGE>
 
substantially all of the Operating Partnership's assets and properties for
cash or for marketable securities; (iv) the entry of a decree of judicial
dissolution of the Operating Partnership pursuant to the provisions of the
Delaware Act; (v) the entry of a final non-appealable order for relief in a
bankruptcy proceeding of the general partner, or the entry of a final non-
appealable judgment ruling that the general partner is bankrupt or insolvent
(except that, in either such case, in certain circumstances the limited
partners (other than Host REIT) may vote to continue the Operating Partnership
and substitute a new general partner in place of Host REIT); or (vi) an
election by Host REIT in its sole and absolute discretion on or after December
31, 2058. Upon dissolution, Host REIT, as general partner, or any liquidator
will proceed to liquidate the assets of the Operating Partnership and apply
the proceeds therefrom in the order of priority set forth in the Partnership
Agreement.
 
OWNERSHIP LIMITATION
 
  In order to help the Operating Partnership avoid being treated as a
corporation for federal income tax purposes, the Partnership Agreement
expressly provides that no Person (other than Host REIT and the wholly owned
subsidiaries (direct and indirect) thereof) or Persons acting as a group may
own, actually or constructively, more than 4.9% by value of any class of
interests in the Operating Partnership. The Partnership Agreement contains
self-executing mechanisms intended to enforce this prohibition. For a
description of the consequences of the Operating Partnership being treated as
a corporation for federal income tax purposes, see "Federal Income Tax
Consequences--Tax Aspects of Host REIT's Ownership of OP Units." As general
partner of the Operating Partnership, Host REIT, in its sole and absolute
discretion, may waive or modify this ownership limitation if it is satisfied
that ownership in excess of this limit will not cause the Operating
Partnership to be treated as a corporation for federal income tax purposes.
Host has agreed to grant The Blackstone Group an exception to this prohibition
subject to the condition that neither The Blackstone Group, nor any person or
entity that would be considered to own OP Units owned by The Blackstone Group,
may own, directly or by attribution, 9.8% or more of the stock of Crestline or
the equity of any of the Lessees.
 
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                             ERISA CONSIDERATIONS
 
STATUS OF HOST REIT AND THE OPERATING PARTNERSHIP UNDER ERISA
 
  This section discusses the extent to which the fiduciary requirements of
ERISA and the prohibited transaction provisions of ERISA and the Code would
apply to Host REIT or the Operating Partnership because one or more investors
in Host REIT or the Operating Partnership is an ERISA Plan or Other Plan.
 
  If the underlying assets of Host REIT are deemed to be assets of an
investing ERISA Plan and Other Plan ("Plan Assets"), (i) the prudence
standards and other provisions of Part 4 of Title I of ERISA and the
prohibited transaction provisions of ERISA and the Code would be applicable to
any transactions involving Host REIT's assets, and (ii) persons who exercise
any authority or control over Host REIT's assets, or who provide investment
advice to Host REIT for a fee or other compensation, would be (for purposes of
ERISA and the Code) fiduciaries of ERISA Plans and Other Plans that acquire
Host REIT Common Stock of Host REIT. Similarly, if the underlying assets of
the Operating Partnership are deemed to be Plan Assets, (i) the prudence
standards and other provisions of Part 4 of Title I of ERISA and the
prohibited transaction provisions of ERISA and the Code would be applicable to
any transactions involving the Operating Partnership's assets, and (ii)
persons who exercise any authority or control over the Operating Partnership's
assets, or who provide investment advice to the Operating Partnership for a
fee or other compensation, would be (for purposes of ERISA and the Code)
fiduciaries of ERISA Plans and Other Plans that acquire Host REIT Common Stock
of Host REIT.
 
  The United States Department of Labor ("DOL"), which has certain
administrative responsibility over ERISA Plans and certain Other Plans, has
issued a regulation defining plan assets for certain purposes ("DOL
Regulation"). The DOL Regulation generally provides that when an ERISA Plan or
Other Plan acquires a security that is an equity interest in an entity and
that security is neither a "publicly offered security" nor a security issued
by an investment company registered under the 1940 Act, the assets of the
ERISA Plan or Other Plan include both the equity interest and an undivided
interest in each of the underlying assets of the entity, unless it is
established either that the entity is an "operating company" (as defined in
the DOL Regulation) or that equity participation in the entity by "benefit
plan investors" is not "significant."
 
  The DOL Regulation defines a "publicly offered security" as a security that
is "widely-held," "freely transferable," and either part of a class of
securities registered under the Exchange Act, or sold pursuant to an effective
registration statement under the Securities Act (provided the securities are
registered under the Exchange Act within 120 days, or such later time as may
be allowed by the Commission (the "Registration Period"), after the end of the
fiscal year of the issuer during which the offering occurred). Host REIT
anticipates that the Host REIT Common Stock will be considered "publicly
offered securities," and therefore the underlying assets of Host REIT would
not be deemed to be Plan Assets of any ERISA Plan or Other Plan that invests
in the Host REIT Common Stock.
 
  The DOL Regulation defines "benefit plan investors" to consist of any
employee benefit plan as defined in section 3(3) of ERISA, any Other Plan, or
any entity whose underlying assets include Plan Assets by reason of an
employee benefit plan's investment in the entity. Equity participation in an
entity by "benefit plan investors" is deemed "significant" if, immediately
after the most recent acquisition of any equity interest in the entity, 25% or
more of the value of any class of equity interest is held by "benefit plan
investors." Furthermore, for purposes of determining the percentage interest
in a class of equity held by "benefit plan investors," the value of interests
held by persons who either have discretionary authority or control over the
entity's assets, or who provide investment advice for a fee, or are affiliates
of such persons, is disregarded.
 
  Based upon the value of the interests in the Partnerships owned by "benefit
plan investors" relative to the value of the interests in the Partnerships
owned by other Partnership investors, the expected Exchange Value for each of
the Partnerships, and the percentage of the Operating Partnership that the
Blackstone Entities will own immediately following the REIT Conversion, the
Operating Partnership believes that immediately following the REIT Conversion
"benefit plan investors" will not own a "significant" percentage of OP Units,
and, thus, the underlying assets of the Operating Partnership will not
constitute Plan Assets of any ERISA Plan or Other Plan that owns OP Units.
Furthermore, the Partnership Agreement will restrict ownership of OP Units by
benefit plan investors to less than 25%.
 
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                        FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSEQUENCES
 
INTRODUCTION
 
  The following discussion summarizes the federal income tax consequences
reasonably anticipated to be material to a Host stockholder in connection with
the Merger, the OP Contribution, the Initial E&P Distribution, and the
ownership and disposition of Host REIT Common Stock. The following discussion
is intended to address only those federal income tax consequences that are
generally relevant to all Host stockholders. Accordingly, it does not discuss
all aspects of federal income taxation that might be relevant to a specific
Host stockholder in light of his particular investment or tax circumstances.
Therefore, it is imperative that a Host stockholder review the following
discussion and consult with his own tax advisors to determine the interaction
of his individual tax situation with the anticipated tax consequences of the
OP Contribution, the Merger, the Initial E&P Distribution, and the subsequent
ownership and disposition of Host REIT Common Stock.
 
  The following discussion provides general information only, is not
exhaustive of all possible tax considerations and is not intended to be (and
should not be construed as) tax advice. For example, this summary does not
give a detailed description of any state, local or foreign tax considerations.
In addition, the discussion does not purport to deal with all aspects of
taxation that may be relevant to a Host stockholder subject to special
treatment under the federal income tax laws, including, without limitation,
insurance companies, financial institutions or broker-dealers, tax-exempt
organizations (except to the extent discussed under the headings "Federal
Income Tax Consequences of the Initial E&P Distribution--Tax Consequences of
the Initial E&P Distribution to Tax-Exempt Host Stockholders" and "Taxation of
Tax-Exempt Stockholders of Host REIT") or foreign corporations and persons who
are not citizens or residents of the United States (except to the extent
discussed under the headings "Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Initial
E&P Distribution--Tax Consequences of the Initial E&P Distribution to Non-U.S.
Stockholders" and "Taxation of Non-U.S. Stockholders").
 
  The information in this section is based on the Code, current, temporary and
proposed Treasury Regulations thereunder, the legislative history of the Code,
current administrative interpretations and practices of the IRS (including its
practices and policies as endorsed in private letter rulings, which are not
binding on the IRS), and court decisions, all as of the date hereof. No
assurance can be given that future legislation, Treasury Regulations,
administrative interpretations and court decisions will not significantly
change the current law or adversely affect existing interpretations of current
law. Any such change could apply retroactively to transactions preceding the
date of the change. No assurance can be provided that the statements set forth
herein (which do not bind the IRS or the courts) will not be challenged by the
IRS or will be sustained by a court if so challenged. Except as described
under "--Federal Income Tax Consequences of the OP Contribution," neither Host
nor Host REIT has requested or plans to request any rulings from the IRS
concerning the tax consequences of the OP Contribution, the Merger, the
Initial E&P Distribution, and the subsequent ownership and disposition of Host
REIT Common Stock.
 
  Hogan & Hartson L.L.P. ("Hogan & Hartson"), counsel to Host, Host REIT and
the Operating Partnership, has delivered to Host and Host REIT an opinion to
the effect that the discussion herein under the heading "Federal Income Tax
Consequences," to the extent that it contains descriptions of applicable
federal income tax law, is correct in all material respects. The opinion,
however, does not purport to address the tax consequences of the OP
Contribution, the Merger, the Initial E&P Distribution, and the subsequent
ownership and disposition of Host REIT Common Stock to any particular Host
stockholder in light of his particular circumstances, nor does it purport to
predict whether, and the extent to which, future events and transactions, only
some of which may be within the control of Host REIT will have a material
adverse impact on the income tax positions of Host REIT stockholders. The
opinion is based on the Code and Treasury Regulations in effect on the date
hereof, current administrative interpretations and positions of the IRS and
existing court decisions. No assurance can be given that future legislation,
Treasury Regulations, administrative interpretations and court decisions will
not significantly change the law or the above conclusions reached by counsel.
In addition, any such change could apply retroactively to transactions
preceding the date of change. Moreover, opinions of counsel merely represent
 
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counsel's best judgment with respect to the probable outcome on the merits and
are not binding on the IRS or the courts. Accordingly, even if there is no
change in applicable law, no assurance can be provided that such opinion
(which does not bind the IRS or the courts) will not be challenged by the IRS
or will be sustained by a court if so challenged.
 
  The following discussion is not intended to be, and should not be construed
by a Host stockholder as, tax advice. THE SPECIFIC TAX ATTRIBUTES OF A
PARTICULAR HOST STOCKHOLDER COULD HAVE A MATERIAL IMPACT ON THE TAX
CONSEQUENCES OF THE OP CONTRIBUTION, THE MERGER, THE INITIAL E&P DISTRIBUTION
AND/OR THE SUBSEQUENT OWNERSHIP AND DISPOSITION OF HOST REIT COMMON STOCK.
THEREFORE, IT IS ESSENTIAL THAT EACH HOST STOCKHOLDER CONSULT WITH HIS OWN TAX
ADVISORS WITH REGARD TO THE APPLICATION OF THE FEDERAL INCOME TAX LAWS TO SUCH
STOCKHOLDER'S PERSONAL TAX SITUATION, AS WELL AS ANY TAX CONSEQUENCES ARISING
UNDER THE LAWS OF ANY STATE, LOCAL OR FOREIGN TAXING JURISDICTION. THE
FOLLOWING DISCUSSION IS NOT INTENDED AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR CAREFUL TAX PLANNING.
 
FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSEQUENCES OF THE MERGER
 
  The Merger is intended to qualify as a reorganization under Section 368(a)
of the Code, and the federal income tax consequences summarized below are
based on the assumption that the Merger will so qualify. Hogan & Hartson,
counsel for Host and Host REIT, has delivered to Host and Host REIT an opinion
to the effect that the Merger will be treated for federal income tax purposes
as a reorganization under Section 368(a) of the Code. The opinion, however,
does not purport to address the tax consequences of the Merger to any
particular Host REIT stockholder in light of his particular circumstances. It
is based on (i) certain factual assumptions and representations made by Host
and Host REIT, and (ii) the Code and Treasury Regulations in effect on the
date hereof, current administrative interpretations and positions of the IRS
and existing court decisions. No assurance can be given that future
legislation, Treasury Regulations, administrative interpretations and court
decisions will not significantly change the law or the above conclusions
reached by counsel. In addition, any such change could apply retroactively to
transactions preceding the date of change. Moreover, opinions of counsel
merely represent counsel's best judgment with respect to the probable outcome
on the merits and are not binding on the IRS or the courts. Accordingly, even
if there is no change in applicable law, no assurance can be provided that
such opinion (which does not bind the IRS or the courts) will not be
challenged by the IRS or will be sustained by a court if so challenged. No
ruling will be sought from the IRS regarding the Merger.
 
  Because the Merger will qualify as a reorganization under the Code, no gain
or loss will be recognized by Host or Host REIT as a result of the Merger. In
addition, no gain or loss will be recognized by a Host stockholder (other than
certain Host stockholders who are not considered "U.S. persons" for purposes
of the Code and who own (or have owned) in excess of 5% of Host Common Stock)
upon the conversion of such holder's shares of Host Common Stock into Host
REIT Common Stock pursuant to the Merger. The initial tax basis of the Host
REIT Common Stock received by such a former Host stockholder pursuant to the
Merger should be the same as the stockholder's adjusted tax basis in the
shares of Host Common Stock being converted pursuant to the Merger (subject to
any adjustment resulting from the Initial E&P Distribution). The holding
period of the Host REIT Common Stock received by such a former Host
stockholder pursuant to the Merger should include the holder's holding period
with respect to the shares of Host Common Stock being converted pursuant to
the Merger, provided that such Host Common Stock is held as a capital asset as
of the Effective Time. See also "Federal Income Tax Consequences of the
Initial E&P Distribution."
 
  Certain Host stockholders that are nonresident alien individuals, foreign
corporations, foreign partnerships or foreign estates or trusts (collectively,
"Non-U.S. Stockholders") could recognize gain or loss pursuant to the Merger.
In particular, because Host is a "U.S. real property holding company" for the
purposes of the Foreign Investment in Real Property Tax Act of 1980
("FIRPTA"), but Host REIT anticipates qualifying as a "domestically controlled
REIT" for purposes of FIRPTA, a Non-U.S. Stockholder who at any time during
the
 
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<PAGE>
 
five-year period ending on the Effective Date owned more than 5% of the Host
Common Stock would recognize gain to the extent that the fair market value of
the Host REIT Common Stock he receives in the Merger exceeds his adjusted tax
basis in his Host Common Stock. Any such Non-U.S. Stockholder would be subject
to regular United States income tax with respect to such gain in the same
manner as a "U.S. person" for purposes of the Code (subject to any applicable
alternative minimum tax, a special alternative minimum tax in the case of
nonresident alien individuals and the possible application of a 30% branch
profits tax in the case of foreign corporations). See "Taxation of Non-U.S.
Stockholders--Sales of Host REIT Common Stock" for a related discussion of the
impact of the application of FIRPTA.
 
FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSEQUENCES OF THE INITIAL E&P DISTRIBUTION
 
  As described more fully above in "The REIT Conversion--The Initial E&P
Distribution," Host stockholders will receive in the Initial E&P Distribution
(i) Crestline common stock and (ii) cash or other consideration. Host
currently contemplates that such other consideration will be in the form of
either a specified dollar amount of cash or a specified fraction of a share of
Host Common Stock (or, if the Merger has occurred, a share of Host REIT Common
Stock), as elected by the Host stockholder (with the non-transferable right to
make such election referred to as the "Election Right"). Although no assurance
can be provided that such other consideration will take this form, the
following discussion is based on the assumption that it will. The Initial E&P
Distribution will assist Host REIT to meet the requirement that it distribute
to its stockholders its accumulated pre-REIT E&P. For a detailed discussion of
this requirement, see "--Federal Income Taxation of Host REIT Following the
Merger--Requirements for Qualification," below.
 
  Tax Consequences of the Initial E&P Distribution to U.S. Stockholders. As
used herein, the term "U.S. Stockholder" means a Host stockholder who (for
United States federal income tax purposes) is (i) a citizen or resident of the
United States, (ii) a corporation, partnership or other entity created or
organized in or under the laws of the United States or of any political
subdivision thereof, (iii) an estate or trust the income of which is subject
to United States federal income taxation regardless of its source, or (iv) a
trust whose administration is subject to the primary supervision of a United
States court and which has one or more United States persons who have the
authority to control all substantial decisions of the trust.
 
  A U.S. Stockholder will include the fair market value of his share of the
Initial E&P Distribution in gross income as ordinary income to the extent that
the Initial E&P Distribution is made out of the U.S. Stockholder's share of
the portion of the current and accumulated E&P of Host and Host REIT allocable
to the Initial E&P Distribution. The income attributable to the distribution
of the Crestline stock will be recognized when the Host stockholders become
the owners of that stock, which is currently anticipated to occur in 1998. In
addition, although the law is not entirely clear, Host intends to take the
position that the income attributable to the Election Rights will be
recognized in 1999 when it is determined what a Host stockholder will receive
(i.e., cash or stock, and if stock, the value thereof) and such cash or stock
is payable to the Host stockholders. Under this approach, the fair market
value of a U.S. Stockholder's share of the Initial E&P Distribution would
equal the sum of (i) the fair market value (on the distribution date, which
currently is expected to be in 1998) of the Crestline common stock that he
receives in the Initial E&P Distribution, (ii) the amount of cash he receives
in lieu of fractional shares of Crestline common stock, (iii) the amount of
cash or the fair market value of the stock he receives in 1999 by reason of
his election pursuant to his exercise of the Election Rights, plus (iv) the
amount of any other cash and fair market value of any other consideration he
receives in the Initial E&P Distribution. Thus, insofar as a U.S. Stockholder
elects to receive cash pursuant to his exercise of the Election Rights, the
income recognized would include the amount of the cash he so receives. With
respect to a U.S. Stockholder that elects to receive Host (or Host REIT) stock
pursuant to his exercise of the Election Rights, the law is not entirely
clear, but Host intends to take the position that the fair market value of the
consideration he receives as a result of such exercise will equal the sum of
(i) fair market value of the stock he so receives as of the end of the period
during which the election under the Election Rights can be made, plus (ii) the
amount of any cash he receives in lieu of fractional shares of such stock. No
assurance can be provided, however, that the IRS would not challenge this
position regarding the taxation of the cash or stock received pursuant to
exercise of the Election Rights (for
 
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example, contending that the Election Rights themselves are property that must
be valued as of the date the right to make such election becomes vested in a
Host stockholder (which presumably would be the record date determining the
Host stockholders eligible to exercise the Election Rights, or possibly the
date on which notice of such Election Right is distributed to the Host
stockholders) and included in income on such date, which currently is expected
to be in 1998), or that such an IRS challenge would not be sustained by a
court. In determining whether the Initial E&P Distribution is made out of the
current and accumulated E&P of Host and Host REIT, such E&P will be allocated
pursuant to complex rules under the Code in the following order: first, to the
portion of the Initial E&P Distribution that is distributed on the
distribution date (which Host intends to take the position consists only of
the Crestline common stock), and second, to the portion of the Initial E&P
Distribution that is distributed after the distribution date (which, although
the law is not entirely clear, Host intends to take the position will include
the cash and stock distributed pursuant to exercise of the Election Rights).
 
  Host currently estimates that the Initial E&P Distribution will be
approximately $2.10 to $2.50 per share of Host Common Stock (of which
approximately $   would be attributable to exercise of the Election Rights,
assuming that a Host stockholder were to elect to receive cash). No assurance
can be provided, however, that this estimate will be accurate. If the value of
the Initial E&P Distribution is greater than Host's current estimate (for
example, because the value of the Crestline common stock received is higher
than currently estimated or because a stockholder elects to receive stock
pursuant to the Election Right and the value of such stock is higher than the
dollar amount of the cash that could have been received pursuant thereto),
then a U.S. Stockholder will include such additional amount in gross income as
ordinary income to the extent of the U.S. Stockholder's share of the portion
of the current and accumulated E&P of Host and Host REIT allocable to the
Initial E&P Distribution.
 
  A U.S. Stockholder will have a basis in the Crestline common stock he
receives in the Initial E&P Distribution equal to the fair market value of
such stock on the distribution date and his holding period in such stock will
begin on the day after the distribution date. Although the law is not entirely
clear, consistent with the approach outlined in the preceding paragraph, Host
intends to take the position that a U.S. Stockholder who elects to receive
stock pursuant to exercise of the Election Rights would have a basis in such
stock equal to the fair market value of such stock on the day after the final
day of the election period under the Election Rights, and his holding period
in such stock would begin on that day.
 
  Host currently believes that the substantial majority, if not all, of the
Initial E&P Distribution will be considered made out of the portion of Host
and Host REIT's current and accumulated E&P allocable to the Initial E&P
Distribution. The calculation of such E&P, however, will be very complex. The
amount will include (i) the allocated consolidated E&P of Host (including each
of its predecessors) accumulated from 1929, the first year that the
predecessor of Host was a "C" corporation, through and including Host's 1998
taxable year, (ii) the current E&P of Host and Host REIT in 1998, and (iii) to
the extent the Initial E&P Distribution occurs in 1999, the current E&P of
Host and Host REIT in 1999. In addition, the calculation depends upon a number
of factual and legal interpretations related to the activities and operations
of Host and its corporate affiliates during its entire corporate existence and
is subject to review and challenge by the IRS. There can be no assurance that
Host and Host REIT's calculation of this E&P will be respected by the IRS or
that a challenge to such calculations by the IRS would not be sustained by a
court. Hogan & Hartson will express no opinion as to the amount of the current
and accumulated E&P of Host and Host REIT.
 
  To the extent that the sum of the amount of the Initial E&P Distribution
received by a U.S. Stockholder exceeds his share of the portion of Host and
Host REIT's current and accumulated E&P allocable to the Initial E&P
Distribution, it will be treated first as a tax-free return of capital to such
U.S. Stockholder, reducing the adjusted basis in his Host Common Stock by the
amount of such excess (but not below zero) and then, if such basis is reduced
to zero and there is remaining excess, as capital gain to the extent of such
remaining excess (provided that such Host Stockholder has held the Host Common
Stock as a capital asset).
 
 
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  Backup Withholding for the Initial E&P Distribution. Under the backup
withholding rules, a U.S. Stockholder may be subject to backup withholding at
the rate of 31% with respect to the Initial E&P Distribution paid unless such
holder (a) is a corporation or comes within certain other exempt categories
and, when required, demonstrates this fact or (b) provides a taxpayer
identification number, certifies as to no loss of exemption from backup
withholding and otherwise complies with applicable requirements of the backup
withholding rules. See "--Taxation of Non-U.S. Stockholders."
 
  Tax Consequences of the Initial E&P Distribution to Tax-Exempt Host
Stockholders. Provided that a tax-exempt Host stockholder (except certain tax-
exempt Host stockholders described in the following sentence) has not held its
Host Common Stock as "debt financed property" within the meaning of the Code
and such Host Common Stock is not otherwise used in a trade or business, the
Initial E&P Distribution will not constitute unrelated business taxable income
("UBTI"). For a tax-exempt Host stockholder that is a social club, voluntary
employee benefit association, supplemental unemployment benefit trust or
qualified group legal services plan exempt from federal income taxation under
Code Sections 501 (c)(7), (c)(9), (c)(17) or (c)(20), respectively, the
Initial E&P Distribution will constitute UBTI unless the organization is
properly able to deduct amounts set aside or placed in reserve for certain
purposes so as to offset the income generated by its investment in Host. Such
Host stockholders should consult their own tax advisors concerning these "set
aside" and reserve requirements.
 
  Tax Consequences of the Initial E&P Distribution to Non-U.S. Stockholders. A
Non-U.S. Stockholder will treat the fair market value of the Initial E&P
Distribution as ordinary income to the extent of the Non-U.S. Stockholder's
share of the current and accumulated E&P of Host REIT allocable to the Initial
E&P Distribution. For a discussion regarding the fair market value of the
Initial E&P Distribution and the extent to which the Initial E&P Distribution
will be attributable to such E&P, see "--Tax Consequences of the Initial E&P
Distribution to U.S. Stockholders" above.
 
  For Non-U.S. Stockholders, the Initial E&P Distribution will be subject to
withholding of United States federal income tax on a gross basis (that is,
without allowance of deductions) at a 30% rate or such lower rate as may be
specified by an applicable income tax treaty, unless it is treated as
effectively connected with the conduct by the Non-U.S. Stockholder of a United
States trade or business. Certain certification and disclosure requirements
must be satisfied to be exempt from withholding under the effectively
connected income exemption. If the Initial E&P Distribution is effectively
connected with such a trade or business, a Non-U.S. Stockholder will be
subject to tax on the Initial E&P Distribution on a net basis (that is, after
allowance of deductions) at graduated rates, in the same manner as U.S.
Stockholders are taxed with respect to the Initial E&P Distribution, and
generally will not be subject to withholding. A Non-U.S. Stockholder that is a
corporation may also be subject to an additional branch profits tax on the
Initial E&P Distribution at a 30% rate or such lower rate as may be specified
by an applicable income tax treaty. See "--Taxation of Non-U.S. Stockholders,"
below.
 
  To the extent that the sum of the fair market value of the Initial E&P
Distribution received by a Non-U.S. Stockholder exceeds his share of the
portion of Host and Host REIT's current and accumulated E&P allocable to the
Initial E&P Distribution, it will be treated first as a tax-free return of
capital to such Non-U.S. Stockholder, reducing the adjusted basis in his Host
Common Stock (or Host REIT Common Stock, to the extent the Initial E&P
Distribution occurs after the Merger) by the amount of such excess (but not
below zero). If such basis is reduced to zero and there is remaining excess,
the Initial E&P Distribution will give rise to gain from the sale or exchange
of such stock. For a discussion of the federal income tax consequences of a
sale or exchange of Host REIT Common Stock by a Non-U.S. Stockholder, see "--
Taxation of Non-U.S. Stockholders--Sales of Host REIT Common Stock," below.
 
  As a result of a legislative change made by the Small Business Job
Protection Act of 1996, it appears that Host would be required to withhold 10%
of any distribution in excess of Host and Host REIT's current and accumulated
E&P. Consequently, although Host currently intends to withhold at a rate of
30% on the entire amount of any distribution (or a lower applicable treaty
rate), to the extent that Host does not do so, any portion of the Initial E&P
Distribution not subject to withholding at a rate of 30% (or a lower
applicable treaty rate) will be subject to withholding at a rate of 10%.
However, a Non-U.S. Stockholder may seek a refund of such amounts
 
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from the IRS if it subsequently determined that the Initial E&P Distribution
was, in fact, in excess of such E&P, and the amount withheld exceeded the Non-
U.S. Stockholder's United States tax liability, if any, with respect to the
Initial E&P Distribution.
 
  To the extent that withholding tax is owed with respect to any Non-U.S.
Stockholder with respect to Crestline common stock received in the Initial E&P
Distribution and any Host (or Host REIT) stock received pursuant to exercise
of the Election Rights, Host anticipates that the transfer agent would sell in
the market a portion of the shares of stock distributable to such Non-U.S.
Stockholder to pay such withholding taxes and the actual number of shares of
Crestline common stock and any Host (or Host REIT) stock received pursuant to
exercise of the Election Rights would be net of any shares sold to pay such
withholding taxes.
 
FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSEQUENCES OF THE OP CONTRIBUTION
 
  As described more fully above in "The Restructuring Transactions--The OP
Contribution," Host will contribute certain of its assets (excluding the
Crestline common stock, cash and other consideration to be distributed
pursuant to the Initial E&P Distribution and certain other de minimis assets)
to the Operating Partnership in exchange for OP Units, preferred partnership
interests in the Operating Partnership (if Host has outstanding any preferred
stock), and the assumption by the Operating Partnership of all liabilities of
Host (other than liabilities of Crestline).
 
  Section 721 of the Code provides that no gain or loss is recognized in the
case of a contribution of property to a partnership in exchange for an
interest in the partnership. Accordingly, Section 721 generally would apply to
prevent the recognition of gain by Host in the OP Contribution. However, there
are several potential exceptions to the availability of nonrecognition
treatment under Section 721 that could result in Host recognizing gain in
connection with the OP Contribution.
 
  First, the assumption by the Operating Partnership of Host liabilities would
result in a deemed distribution of cash to Host in an amount equal to the
excess, if any, of such liabilities over Host's share of the liabilities of
the Operating Partnership immediately after the OP Contribution and the
Partnership Mergers. To the extent any such deemed distribution of cash
exceeds Host's adjusted tax basis in the assets it transfers to the Operating
Partnership, Host will recognize gain in the OP Contribution. However, based
upon the amount of its liabilities outstanding and the adjusted tax basis of
its various assets, Host currently believes that immediately after the OP
Contribution and the Partnership Mergers it will not be deemed to have
received a deemed cash distribution that would result in the recognition of
gain in the OP Contribution.
 
  Second, the OP Contribution would not be tax free to Host to the extent that
it were treated as a "disguised sale" of all or a portion of the assets Host
contributes to the Operating Partnership under the Code or Treasury
Regulations. Section 707 of the Code and the Treasury Regulations thereunder
(the "Disguised Sale Regulations") generally provide that, unless one of
certain prescribed exceptions is applicable, a partner's contribution of
property to a partnership and a simultaneous transfer of money or other
consideration (other than an interest in the partnership) from the partnership
to the partner will be treated as a sale, in whole or in part, of such
property by the partner to the partnership. For purposes of these rules,
assumptions of certain liabilities are treated as transfers of money or other
property from the partnership to the partner which may give rise to a
disguised sale. In addition, the Disguised Sale Regulations provide generally
that transfers of money or other consideration between a partnership and a
partner that are made within two years of each other are presumed to be a sale
unless the facts and circumstances clearly establish that either the transfers
do not constitute a sale or an exception to disguised sale treatment applies.
 
  One exception to "disguised sale" treatment in the Disguised Sale
Regulations relates to the assumption of "qualified liabilities" in connection
with a contribution of property to a partnership. A second exception to
"disguised sale" treatment relates to distributions of "operating cash flow,"
which are presumed not to be a part of a sale of property to a partnership
unless the facts and circumstances clearly establish that such distributions
are part of a sale. A third exception to "disguised sale" treatment relates to
distributions made to
 
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partners to reimburse them for certain "preformation" capital expenditures.
The application of these and other exceptions to the Disguised Sale
Regulations are highly complex and depend on a number of factual
determinations and other outside events which may or may not occur, but Host
currently believes that even if a portion of the OP Contribution were treated
as a disguised sale under the Disguised Sale Regulations, Host would not
recognize a material amount of gain in the OP Contribution.
 
  Third, if the OP Contribution were considered to be a transfer to an
"investment company," as defined in the Treasury Regulations, gain would be
recognized on such transfer under Section 721 of the Code. In the case of a
transfer of property to a partnership, the Code and the Treasury Regulations
provide that such transfer would be treated as having been made to an
investment company if the transfer results in a diversification of the
interests of two or more transferors, and the transferee is a partnership more
than 80% of the value of whose assets are "stock and securities." Although the
OP Contribution (when considered together with the Partnership Mergers) will
result in the diversification of the interests of two or more transferors, no
significant portion of the Operating Partnership's assets will constitute
"stock and securities" as defined in the Code. Accordingly, Host currently
believes that the transfers to the Operating Partnership will not constitute
transfers to an "investment company," as defined in the current Treasury
Regulations. It should be noted in this regard, however, that the Operating
Partnership might not meet the IRS's guidelines for obtaining an advance
ruling with respect to this issue.
 
  Although the application of the foregoing exceptions to nonrecognition
treatment is extremely complex, Host currently believes that such application
will not result in the recognition by Host of a material amount of gain in
connection with the OP Contribution. However, even if Host does not recognize
material gain in the OP Contribution, there are a variety of subsequent events
and transactions including (i) the sale or other taxable disposition of
appreciated assets contributed by Host to the Operating Partnership in the OP
Contribution (including one or more of the Hotels contributed by Host), (ii)
the refinancing or repayment of certain liabilities secured by one or more of
the Hotels contributed to the Operating Partnership by Host in the OP
Contribution, (iii) the issuance of additional OP Units, including in
connection with the acquisition of additional properties by the Operating
Partnership in exchange for OP Units or other equity interests in the
Operating Partnership, (iv) an increase to the basis of one or more of the
Hotels contributed to the Operating Partnership by Host in the OP Contribution
resulting from capital expenditures and (v) the elimination over time of the
disparity between the current tax basis of one or more of the Hotels
contributed to the Operating Partnership by Host in the OP Contribution and
the "book basis" of such assets (based upon their fair market value at the
time of the OP Contribution) that could cause Host REIT to recognize part or
all of the taxable gain that otherwise has been deferred pursuant to the OP
Contribution. It should be noted that Host REIT, as general partner of the
Operating Partnership, will have control over whether the Operating
Partnership will undertake specific transactions.
 
FEDERAL INCOME TAXATION OF HOST REIT FOLLOWING THE MERGER
 
  General. Host REIT plans to make an election to be taxed as a REIT under
Sections 856 through 859 of the Code, effective for its first taxable year
commencing after the REIT Conversion. Host REIT intends that, commencing with
such first taxable year, it will be organized and will operate in such a
manner as to qualify for taxation as a REIT under the Code, and Host REIT
intends to continue to operate in such a manner, but no assurance can be given
that it in fact will continue to operate in such a manner so as to qualify or
remain qualified.
 
  The sections of the Code and the corresponding Treasury Regulations that
govern the federal income tax treatment of a REIT and its stockholders are
highly technical and complex. The following sets forth a summary of the
material aspects of these rules, which summary, however, is qualified in its
entirety by the applicable Code provisions, rules and regulations promulgated
thereunder, and administrative and judicial interpretations thereof.
 
  Hogan & Hartson has acted as counsel to Host REIT in connection with the
REIT Conversion and Host REIT's election to be taxed as a REIT. Hogan &
Hartson has provided to Host REIT and the Operating Partnership an opinion to
the effect that, beginning with Host REIT's first full taxable year commencing
after
 
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the REIT Conversion is completed, Host REIT will be organized in conformity
with the requirements for qualification as a REIT, and its proposed method of
operation will enable it to meet the requirements for qualification and
taxation as a REIT under the Code. It must be emphasized that this opinion is
conditioned upon completion of the REIT Conversion and upon certain
representations made by Host REIT and the Operating Partnership as to factual
matters relating to the organization and operation of Host REIT, the Operating
Partnership, the Partnerships and Private Partnerships, the Subsidiary
Partnerships, the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries, the Host Employee Trust and
Crestline and the Lessees, including the structure of each Lease. In addition,
this opinion is based upon the factual representations of Host REIT concerning
its business and properties as described in this Proxy Statement/Prospectus
and assumes that the actions described in this Proxy Statement/Prospectus are
completed in a timely fashion. Moreover, such qualification and taxation as a
REIT depends upon Host REIT's ability to meet on an ongoing basis (through
actual annual operating results, distribution levels and diversity of share
ownership) the various qualification tests imposed under the Code discussed
below, the results of which will not be reviewed by Hogan & Hartson.
Accordingly, no assurance can be given that the actual results of Host REIT's
operations for any particular taxable year will satisfy such requirements.
Further, the anticipated income tax treatment described in this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus may be changed, perhaps retroactively, by legislative,
administrative or judicial action at any time. See "--Failure of Host REIT to
Qualify as a REIT" below.
 
  If Host REIT qualifies for taxation as a REIT, it generally will not be
subject to federal corporate income taxes on its net income that is currently
distributed to its stockholders. This treatment would substantially eliminate
the "double taxation" (at the corporate and stockholder levels) that generally
results from investment in a regular corporation. However, Host REIT will be
subject to federal income tax as follows:
 
    1. Host REIT will be taxed at regular corporate rates on any
  undistributed "REIT taxable income," including undistributed net capital
  gains (provided, however, that properly designated undistributed capital
  gains will effectively avoid taxation at the stockholder level). A REIT's
  "REIT taxable income" is the otherwise taxable income of the REIT subject
  to certain adjustments, including a deduction for dividends paid.
 
    2. Under certain circumstances, Host REIT may be subject to the
  "alternative minimum tax" on its items of tax preference.
 
    3. If Host REIT has (i) net income from the sale or other disposition of
  "foreclosure property" which is held primarily for sale to customers in the
  ordinary course of business or (ii) other nonqualifying income from
  foreclosure property, it will be subject to tax at the highest corporate
  rate on such income.
 
    4. If Host REIT has net income from "prohibited transactions" (which are,
  in general, certain sales or other dispositions of property held primarily
  for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business other than
  foreclosure property), such income will be subject to a 100% tax.
 
    5. If Host REIT should fail to satisfy the 75% gross income test or the
  95% gross income test (as discussed below), but has nonetheless maintained
  its qualification as a REIT because certain other requirements have been
  met, it will be subject to a 100% tax on an amount equal to (a) the gross
  income attributable to the greater of the amount by which Host REIT fails
  the 75% or 95% test multiplied by (b) a fraction intended to reflect Host
  REIT's profitability.
 
    6. If Host REIT should fail to distribute during each calendar year at
  least the sum of (i) 85% of its REIT ordinary income for such year, (ii)
  95% of its REIT capital gain net income for such year and (iii) any
  undistributed taxable income from prior periods, Host REIT would be subject
  to a 4% excise tax on the excess of such required distribution over the sum
  of amounts actually distributed and amounts retained but with respect to
  which federal income tax was paid.
 
    7. If Host REIT acquires any asset from a "C" corporation (i.e.,
  generally a corporation subject to full corporate-level tax) in a
  transaction in which the basis of the asset in the hands of Host REIT is
  determined by reference to the basis of the asset in the hands of the "C"
  corporation (a "Built-In Gain Asset"), and Host REIT recognizes gain on the
  disposition of such asset during the ten-year period beginning on the date
  on which such asset was acquired by Host REIT (the "Recognition Period"),
  then,
 
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  to the extent of the asset's "Built-In Gain" (i.e., the excess of (a) the
  fair market value of such asset over (b) Host REIT's adjusted basis in the
  asset, determined when Host REIT acquired the asset), such gain will be
  subject to tax at the highest regular corporate rate applicable.
 
  Host REIT will own an indirect interest in appreciated assets that Host held
before the REIT Conversion. Such appreciated assets will have a "carryover"
basis and thus will be "Built-In Gain Assets" with respect to Host REIT. Under
IRS Notice 88-19, unless Host REIT were to elect to be subject to corporate
income tax on any Built-In Gain recognized with respect to such Built-In Gain
Assets during the Recognition Period commencing on the first day of Host
REIT's first taxable year as a REIT, Host would have to pay federal corporate
income tax on the Built-In Gain at the time of the REIT Conversion. In
connection with the REIT Conversion, Host REIT will make the election provided
for in Notice 88-19 with respect to all of Host's assets that will be owned by
the Operating Partnership subsequent to the REIT Conversion. As a result of
this election, if such appreciated property is sold within the ten-year period
following the REIT Conversion, Host REIT will generally be subject to regular
corporate tax on that gain to the extent of the Built-In Gain in that property
at the time of the REIT Conversion. The total amount of gain on which Host
REIT can be taxed is limited to its net Built-In Gain (defined for these
purposes as the excess of the aggregate fair market value of its assets at the
time it became a REIT over the adjusted tax bases of those assets at that
time) at the time of the REIT Conversion. This tax could be very material,
however, and may result in the Operating Partnership and Host REIT seeking to
avoid a taxable disposition of any significant assets owned by Host at the
time of the REIT Conversion for the ten taxable years following the REIT
Conversion (even though such disposition might otherwise be in the best
interests of Host REIT).
 
  Notwithstanding Host REIT's status as a REIT, it is likely that substantial
deferred liabilities of Host will be recognized over the next ten years
(including, but not limited to, tax liabilities attributable to Built-In Gain
Assets and deferred tax liabilities attributable to taxable income for which
neither Host REIT nor the Operating Partnership will receive corresponding
cash). In addition, the IRS could assert substantial additional liabilities
for taxes against Host for taxable years prior to the time Host REIT qualifies
as a REIT. Under the terms of the REIT Conversion and the Partnership
Agreement, the Operating Partnership will be responsible for paying (or
reimbursing Host REIT for the payment of) all such tax liabilities as well as
any other liabilities (including contingent liabilities and liabilities
attributable to litigation that Host REIT may incur), whether such liabilities
are incurred by reason of Host's activities prior to the REIT Conversion or
the activities of Host REIT subsequent thereto.
 
  The Operating Partnership will pay (or reimburse Host REIT for) all taxes
incurred by Host REIT (except for taxes imposed on Host REIT by reason of its
failure to qualify as a REIT or to distribute to its stockholders an amount
equal to its "REIT taxable income," including net capital gains). This
obligation by the Operating Partnership would include any federal corporate
income tax imposed on Built-In Gain.
 
  Requirements for Qualification. The Code defines a REIT as a corporation,
trust or association (i) which is managed by one or more directors or
trustees; (ii) the beneficial ownership of which is evidenced by transferable
shares or by transferable certificates of beneficial interest; (iii) which
would be taxable as a domestic corporation, but for Sections 856 through 859
of the Code; (iv) which is neither a financial institution nor an insurance
company subject to certain provisions of the Code; (v) the beneficial
ownership of which is held by 100 or more persons; (vi) during the last half
of each taxable year not more than 50% in value of the outstanding stock of
which is owned, actually or constructively, by five or fewer individuals (as
defined in the Code to include certain entities) (the "not closely held"
requirement); and (vii) which meets certain other tests, described below,
regarding the nature of its income and assets.
 
  The Code provides that conditions (i) to (iv), inclusive, must be met during
the entire taxable year and that condition (v) must be met during at least 335
days of a taxable year of twelve months, or during a proportionate part of a
taxable year of less than twelve months. Conditions (v) and (vi) will not
apply until after the first taxable year for which Host REIT makes the
election to be taxed as a REIT. For purposes of conditions (v) and (vi),
pension funds and certain other tax-exempt entities are treated as
individuals, subject to a "look-through"
 
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exception in the case of condition (vi). Compliance with condition (v) shall
be determined by disregarding the ownership of Host REIT shares by any
person(s) who: (1) acquired such Host REIT shares as a gift or bequest or
pursuant to a legal separation or divorce; (2) is the estate of any person
making such transfer to the estate; or (3) is a company established
exclusively for the benefit of (or wholly-owned by) either the person making
such transfer or a person described in (1) or (2). In connection with
condition (vi), Host REIT is required to send annual letters to its
stockholders requesting information regarding the actual ownership of its
shares. If Host REIT complies with this requirement, and it does not know, or
exercising reasonable diligence would not have known, whether it failed to
meet condition (vi), then it will be treated as having met condition (vi). If
Host REIT fails to send such annual letters, it will be required to pay either
a $25,000 penalty or, if the failure is intentional, a $50,000 penalty. The
IRS may require Host REIT, under those circumstances, to take further action
to ascertain actual ownership of its shares, and failure to comply with such
an additional requirement would result in an additional $25,000 (or $50,000)
penalty. No penalty would be assessed in the first instance, however, if the
failure to send the letters is due to reasonable cause and not to willful
neglect.
 
  Host REIT believes that it will meet conditions (i) through (iv). In
addition, Host REIT believes that it will have outstanding (commencing with
its first taxable year as a REIT) Host REIT Common Stock with sufficient
diversity of ownership to allow it to satisfy conditions (v) and (vi). With
respect to condition (vi), Host REIT intends to comply with the requirement
that it send annual letters to its stockholders requesting information
regarding the actual ownership of its shares. In addition, the Host REIT
Charter provides for restrictions regarding the transfer and ownership of Host
REIT Common Stock, which restrictions are intended to assist Host REIT in
continuing to satisfy the share ownership requirements described in (v) and
(vi) above. Such ownership and transfer restrictions are described in
"Description of Host REIT Capital Stock--Restrictions on Ownership and
Transfer." These restrictions, together with compliance with the annual
stockholder letter requirement described above, however, may not ensure that
Host REIT will, in all cases, be able to satisfy the share ownership
requirements described above. If Host REIT fails to satisfy such share
ownership requirements, Host REIT's status as a REIT will terminate. See "--
Failure of Host REIT to Qualify as a REIT."
 
  A corporation may not elect to become a REIT unless its taxable year is the
calendar year. Although Host currently has adopted a 52-53 week year ending on
the Friday closest to January 1, Host REIT will adopt a calendar year taxable
year in connection with the REIT Conversion.
 
  Distribution of "Earnings and Profits" Attributable to "C" Corporation
Taxable Years. In order to qualify as a REIT, Host REIT cannot have at the end
of any taxable year any undistributed E&P that is attributable to a "C"
corporation taxable year. A REIT has until the close of its first taxable year
as a REIT in which it has non-REIT earnings and profits to distribute such
E&P. In connection with the REIT Conversion, Host REIT intends to make the
Initial E&P Distribution. The aggregate amount of the Initial E&P Distribution
is currently expected to be in the range of $525 to $625 million and is
intended to eliminate the substantial majority, if not all, of Host's
undistributed E&P. For a more detailed discussion of the Initial E&P
Distribution, see "The REIT Conversion--The Initial E&P Distribution," above.
For a discussion of the federal income tax consequences of the Initial E&P
Distribution, see "--Federal Income Tax Consequences of the Initial E&P
Distribution," above. To the extent, however, that Host has any such
undistributed E&P at the time of the REIT Conversion (including E&P resulting
from either transactions undertaken in contemplation of the REIT Conversion or
the REIT Conversion itself), such E&P (the "Acquired Earnings") will carry
over to Host REIT and will be treated as accumulated earnings and profits of a
REIT attributable to non-REIT years. Host REIT will be required to distribute
such E&P prior to the end of 1999 (the first taxable year for which the REIT
election of Host REIT currently is expected to be effective). Failure to do so
would result in disqualification of Host REIT as a REIT at least for taxable
year 1999. If Host REIT should be so disqualified for taxable year 1999,
subject to the satisfaction by Host REIT of certain "deficiency dividend"
procedures described below in "--Annual Distribution Requirements Applicable
to REITs" and assuming that Host REIT otherwise satisfies the requirements for
qualification as a REIT, Host REIT should qualify as a REIT for taxable year
2000 and thereafter. Host REIT believes that, prior to December 31, 1999, the
Initial E&P Distribution, together with any subsequent distributions of
Acquired Earnings made prior to December 31, 1999, will be sufficient to
distribute
 
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all of the Acquired Earnings, but there are substantial uncertainties relating
to the estimate of the Acquired Earnings, as described below, and the value of
noncash consideration to be distributed as part of the Initial E&P
Distribution, and, thus, there can be no assurance this requirement will be
met.
 
  The estimated amount of the Acquired Earnings will be based on the allocated
consolidated earnings and profits of Host (including each of its predecessors)
accumulated from 1929, the first year that the predecessor of Host was a "C"
corporation, through and including Host's 1998 taxable year (and taking into
account the allocation, as a matter of law, of 81% of Host's accumulated E&P
to Marriott International on October 8, 1993 in connection with the Marriott
International Distribution), determined based on the available tax returns and
certain assumptions with respect to both such returns and other matters. The
calculation of the Acquired Earnings, however, depends upon a number of
factual and legal interpretations related to the activities and operations of
Host and its corporate affiliates during its entire corporate existence and is
subject to review and challenge by the IRS. There can be no assurance that the
IRS will not examine the tax returns of Host and its affiliates for all years
prior to and including the REIT Conversion and propose adjustments to increase
their taxable income. The impact of such proposed adjustments, if any, may be
material. If the IRS were to examine Host's calculation of its E&P (and thus
the amount of Acquired Earnings, if any), the IRS can consider all taxable
years of Host, its affiliates and its predecessors as open for review for
purposes of such determination.
 
  Hogan & Hartson will express no opinion as to the amount of E&P of Host and
its predecessors and, accordingly, for purposes of its opinion as to the
qualification of Host REIT as a REIT following the REIT Conversion, Hogan &
Hartson is relying upon a representation from Host REIT that by the end of
1999 it will have eliminated all Acquired Earnings.
 
  Qualified REIT Subsidiary. If Host REIT owns a corporate subsidiary that is
a "qualified REIT subsidiary," that subsidiary will be disregarded for federal
income tax purposes, and all assets, liabilities and items of income,
deduction and credit of the subsidiary will be treated as assets, liabilities
and items of Host REIT itself. Generally, a qualified REIT subsidiary is a
corporation all of the capital stock of which is owned by one REIT. Host REIT
anticipates owning one or more qualified REIT subsidiaries for purposes of
holding de minimis indirect interests in the Hotel Partnerships. A "qualified
REIT subsidiary" will not be subject to federal corporate income taxation,
although it may be subject to state and local taxation in certain
jurisdictions.
 
  Ownership of Partnership Interests by a REIT. In the case of a REIT which is
a partner in a partnership, Treasury Regulations provide that the REIT will be
deemed to own its proportionate share of the assets of the partnership and
will be deemed to be entitled to the income of the partnership attributable to
such share. In addition, the character of the assets and gross income of the
partnership shall retain the same character in the hands of the REIT for
purposes of Section 856 of the Code (including satisfying the gross income
tests and the asset tests). Thus, Host REIT's proportionate share of the
assets and items of income of the Operating Partnership (including the
Operating Partnership's share of such items of the Partnerships, Private
Partnerships and any other subsidiaries that are partnerships or LLCs) will be
treated as assets and items of income of Host REIT for purposes of applying
the requirements described herein. A summary of the rules governing the
federal income taxation of partnerships and their partners is provided below
in "--Tax Aspects of Host REIT's Ownership of OP Units." As the sole general
partner of the Operating Partnership, Host REIT will have direct control over
the Operating Partnership and indirect control over the Hotel Partnerships and
the partnerships in which the Operating Partnership or the Hotel Partnerships
have a controlling interest and intends to operate these entities consistent
with the requirements for qualification of Host REIT as a REIT.
 
  Income Tests Applicable to REITs. In order to maintain qualification as a
REIT, Host REIT annually must satisfy two gross income requirements. First, at
least 75% of Host REIT's gross income (excluding gross income from "prohibited
transactions") for each taxable year must be derived directly or indirectly
from investments relating to real property or mortgages on real property
(including "rents from real property" and, in certain circumstances, interest)
or from certain types of temporary investments. Second, at least 95% of Host
REIT's gross income (excluding gross income from "prohibited transactions")
for each taxable year must be derived
 
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from such real property investments, dividends, interest, certain hedging
instruments and gain from the sale or disposition of stock or securities,
including certain hedging instruments (or from any combination of the
foregoing).
 
  Rents paid pursuant to the Leases (together with dividends and interest
received from the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries) will constitute substantially
all of the gross income of Host REIT. Several conditions must be satisfied in
order for rents received by Host REIT, including the rents received pursuant
to the Leases, to qualify as "rents from real property" in satisfying the
gross income requirements for a REIT described in the preceding paragraph.
First, the amount of rent must not be based in whole or in part on the income
or profits of any person. However, an amount received or accrued generally
will not be excluded from the term "rents from real property" solely by reason
of being based on a fixed percentage or percentages of receipts or sales.
Second, rents received from a tenant will not qualify as "rents from real
property" in satisfying the gross income tests if Host REIT, or an actual or
constructive owner of 10% or more of Host REIT, actually or constructively
owns 10% or more of such tenant (a "Related Party Tenant"). Third, if rent
attributable to personal property, leased in connection with a lease of real
property, is greater than 15% of the total rent received under the lease, then
the portion of rent attributable to such personal property will not qualify as
"rents from real property" (the "15% Personal Property Test").
 
  Finally, if (i) Host REIT operates or manages a property or furnishes or
renders services to the tenants at the property other than through an
independent contractor from whom Host REIT derives no revenue, excluding for
these purposes services "usually or customarily rendered" in connection with
the rental of real property and not otherwise considered "rendered to the
occupant," and (ii) the greater of (a) the income derived from such services
or (b) 150% of the cost of providing such services (the "Impermissible Tenant
Service Income") exceeds one percent of the total amount received by Host REIT
with respect to the property (or, if such services are not available to all
tenants at a property, possibly with respect to each tenant to whom the
services are made available), then no amount received by Host REIT with
respect to the property (or, where possibly applicable, such tenant) will
qualify as "rents from real property." If the Impermissible Tenant Service
Income is one percent or less of the total amount received by the REIT with
respect to the property (or, where possibly applicable, such tenant), then
only the Impermissible Tenant Service Income will not qualify as "rents from
real property." To the extent that services other than those customarily
furnished or rendered in connection with the rental of real property are
rendered to the tenants of the property by an independent contractor, the cost
of the services must be borne by the independent contractor.
 
  The Operating Partnership and each Partnership and Private Partnership that
owns Hotels (together with certain other subsidiaries of the Operating
Partnership that may own Hotels) will enter into a Lease with a Lessee that is
a Crestline subsidiary, pursuant to which the owner of such Hotels will lease
the Hotels that it owns to the Lessee for a term of years (ranging generally
from seven to ten years, depending upon the particular Hotel) commencing on or
before the January 1, 1999 (assuming the Merger occurs prior to that date;
otherwise as soon as practicable following the distribution of the Crestline
common stock as part of the Initial E&P Distribution). In addition, the
Operating Partnership will lease to the Lessees, on similar terms, the Hotels
contributed by the Blackstone Entities. Each Lease will provide for thirteen
payments per annum of the specified Base Rent plus, to the extent that it
would exceed the Base Rent, Percentage Rent, which Percentage Rent will be
calculated based upon the gross sales of the Hotels subject to the particular
Lease, plus certain other amounts. See "Business and Properties--The Leases."
 
  Neither Host REIT nor the Operating Partnership intends to (i) provide any
services to the Lessees with respect to the operation of the Hotels; (ii)
charge rent for any Hotel that is based in whole or in part on the income or
profits of any person (except by reason of being based on a percentage of
receipts or sales, as described above); (iii) rent any Hotel to a Related
Party Tenant (unless the Board of Directors determines in its discretion that
the rent received from such Related Party Tenant is not material and will not
jeopardize Host REIT's status as a REIT); or (iv) derive rental income
attributable to personal property other than personal property leased in
connection with the lease of real property, the amount of which is less than
15% of the total rent received under
 
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the lease (unless the Board of Directors determines in its discretion that the
amount of such rent attributable to personal property is not material and will
not jeopardize Host REIT's status as a REIT).
 
  In order for the rent paid pursuant to the Leases to constitute "rents from
real property," (i) the Lessees must not be regarded as Related Party Tenants;
and (ii) the Leases must be respected as true leases for federal income tax
purposes and not treated as service contracts, joint ventures or some other
type of arrangement. A Lessee will be regarded as a Related Party Tenant only
if Host REIT and/or one or more actual or constructive owners of 10% or more
of Host REIT, actually or constructively, own 10% or more of such Lessee
through an ownership interest in Crestline. In order to help preclude the
Lessees from being regarded as Related Party Tenants, (i) the Articles of
Incorporation of Crestline will expressly prohibit any person, including Host
REIT (and/or any 10% or greater stockholder of Host REIT), from owning more
than 9.8% of the lesser of the number or value of the shares of capital stock
of Crestline; (ii) the Host REIT Charter will expressly prohibit any person or
entity from owning, directly or by attribution, more than 9.8% of the lesser
of the number or value of Host REIT Common Stock (subject to an exception for
Host REIT Common Stock held prior to the REIT Conversion, so long as the
holder thereof would not own more than 9.8% in value of the outstanding shares
of capital stock of Host REIT) or any other class or series of shares of Host
REIT; and (iii) the Partnership Agreement will expressly prohibit any person
or entity (other than Host REIT and the Blackstone Entities) from owning more
than 4.9% by value of any class of interests in the Operating Partnership.
Each of these prohibitions will contain self-executing enforcement mechanisms.
Assuming that these prohibitions are enforced at all times (and no waivers
thereto are granted), the Lessees should not be regarded as Related Party
Tenants. However, there is no assurance that the ownership restrictions
described herein will ensure, in all cases, that the Lessees will not be
regarded as Related Party Tenants.
 
  The determination of whether the Leases are true leases depends upon an
analysis of all the surrounding facts and circumstances. In making such a
determination, courts have considered a variety of factors, including the
following: (i) the intent of the parties; (ii) the form of the agreement;
(iii) the degree of control over the property that is retained by the property
owner (e.g., whether the lessee has substantial control over the operation of
the property or whether the lessee was required simply to use its best efforts
to perform its obligations under the agreement); and (iv) the extent to which
the property owner retains the risk of loss with respect to the property
(e.g., whether the lessee bears the risk of increases in operating expenses or
the risk of damage to the property) or the potential for economic gain (e.g.,
appreciation) with respect to the property.
 
  In addition, Section 7701(e) of the Code provides that a contract that
purports to be a service contract (or a partnership agreement) is treated
instead as a lease of property if the contract is properly treated as such,
taking into account all relevant factors, including whether or not: (i) the
service recipient is in physical possession of the property; (ii) the service
recipient controls the property; (iii) the service recipient has a significant
economic or possessory interest in the property (e.g., the property's use is
likely to be dedicated to the service recipient for a substantial portion of
the useful life of the property, the recipient shares the risk that the
property will decline in value, the recipient shares in any appreciation in
the value of the property, the recipient shares in savings in the property's
operating costs or the recipient bears the risk of damage to or loss of the
property); (iv) the service provider does not bear any risk of substantially
diminished receipts or substantially increased expenditures if there is
nonperformance under the contract; (v) the service provider does not use the
property concurrently to provide significant services to entities unrelated to
the service recipient; and (vi) the total contract price does not
substantially exceed the rental value of the property for the contract period.
Since the determination of whether a service contract should be treated as a
lease is inherently factual, the presence or absence of any single factor may
not be dispositive in every case.
 
  The Leases have been structured with the intent to qualify as true leases
for federal income tax purposes. For example, with respect to each Lease (i)
the Operating Partnership (or, where appropriate, the applicable Partnership
or Private Partnership or other lessor entity) and the Lessee intend for their
relationship to be that of a lessor and lessee and such relationship is
documented by a lease agreement, (ii) the Lessee has the right to exclusive
possession and use and quiet enjoyment of the Hotels covered by the Lease
during the term of the Lease, (iii) the Lessee bears the cost of, and will be
responsible for, day-to-day maintenance and repair of the
 
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Hotels (other than the cost of certain capital expenditures), and will dictate
(through the Managers, who work for the Lessees during the terms of the
Leases) how the Hotels are operated and maintained, (iv) the Lessee bears all
of the costs and expenses of operating the Hotels (including the cost of any
inventory used in their operation) during the term of the Lease (other than
the cost of certain furniture, fixtures and equipment, and certain capital
expenditures), (v) the Lessee benefits from any savings (and bears the burdens
of any increases) in the costs of operating the Hotels during the term of the
Lease, (vi) in the event of damage or destruction to a Hotel, the Lessee is at
economic risk because it will bear the economic burden of the loss in income
from operation of the Hotels subject to the right, in certain circumstances,
to terminate the Lease if the lessor does not restore the Hotel to its prior
condition, (vii) the Lessee has indemnified the Operating Partnership (or,
where appropriate, the applicable Partnership or Private Partnership or other
lessor entity) against all liabilities imposed on the Operating Partnership
(or, where appropriate, the applicable Partnership or Private Partnership or
other lessor entity) during the term of the Lease by reason of (A) injury to
persons or damage to property occurring at the Hotels or (B) the Lessee's use,
management, maintenance or repair of the Hotels, (viii) the Lessee is
obligated to pay, at a minimum, substantial Base Rent for the period of use of
the Hotels under the Lease, (ix) the Lessee stands to incur substantial losses
(or reap substantial gains) depending on how successfully it (through the
Managers, who work for the Lessees during the terms of the Leases) operates
the Hotels, and (x) Host REIT and the Operating Partnership believe that each
Lessee reasonably expects to derive a meaningful profit, after expenses and
taking into account the risks associated with the Lease, from the operation of
the Hotels during the term of its Leases. Moreover, upon termination of a
Lease, each Hotel is expected to have a remaining useful life equal to at
least 20% of its expected useful life on the date of the consummation of the
REIT Conversion, and a fair market value equal to at least 20% of its fair
market value on the date of the consummation of the REIT Conversion.
 
  Based upon representations made by Host REIT and the Operating Partnership
(including, but not limited to, representations as to the matters described in
the previous paragraph), Hogan & Hartson, counsel to Host REIT, has provided
to Host REIT an opinion letter to the effect that the Leases will be respected
as leases for federal income tax purposes. As noted previously, however, an
opinion of counsel does not bind the IRS or the courts. Moreover, Limited
Partners should be aware that there are no controlling Treasury Regulations,
published IRS rulings or judicial decisions involving leases with terms
substantially the same as the Leases that discuss whether such leases
constitute true leases for federal income tax purposes. Therefore, there can
be no assurance that the IRS will not assert a contrary position or that such
position will be sustained by a court if so challenged. If the Leases were
recharacterized as service contracts or partnership agreements, rather than
true leases, or disregarded altogether for tax purposes, all or part of the
payments that the Operating Partnership receives from the Lessees would not be
considered rent or would not otherwise satisfy the various requirements for
qualification as "rents from real property." In that case, Host REIT very
likely would not be able to satisfy either the 75% or 95% gross income tests
and, as a result, would lose its REIT status.
 
  As indicated above, "rents from real property" must not be based in whole or
in part on the income or profits of any person. Payments made pursuant to the
Leases should qualify as "rents from real property" since they will be based
on either a fixed dollar amount (i.e., Base Rent) or specified percentages of
gross sales (i.e., Percentage Rents) which percentages will be fixed at the
time the Leases are entered into. The foregoing assumes that the Leases (i)
are not renegotiated during their term in a manner that has the effect of
basing either Percentage Rent or Base Rent on income or profits and (ii) are
not in reality used as a means of basing rent on income or profits. More
generally, the rent payable under the Leases would not qualify as "rents from
real property" if, considering the Leases and all the surrounding
circumstances, the arrangement does not conform with normal business practice,
but is in reality used as a means of basing rent on income or profits. Because
each of the Base Rent and the Percentage Rent will be based on fixed dollar
amounts and fixed percentages of the gross sales of each Hotel that are
established in the Leases, and Host REIT has represented that (i) the
percentages will not be renegotiated during the terms of the Leases in a
manner that has the effect of basing rent on income or profits and (ii) the
Leases conform with normal business practice and were not intended to be used
as a means of basing rent on income or profits, the rent payable under the
Leases should not be considered based in whole or in part on the income or
profits of any person. Furthermore, Host REIT has represented that, with
 
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respect to other properties that it acquires in the future, it will not charge
rent for any property that is based in whole or in part on the income or
profits of any person (except by reason of being based on a fixed percentage
of gross revenues, as described above).
 
  Host REIT may lease certain items of personal property to the Lessees in
connection with the Leases. The 15% Personal Property Test provides that if a
lease provides for the rental of both real and personal property and the
portion of the rent attributable to personal property is 15% or less of the
total rent due under the lease, then all rent paid pursuant to such lease
qualifies as "rent from real property." If, however, a lease provides for the
rental of both real and personal property, and the portion of the rent
attributable to personal property exceeds 15% of the total rent due under the
lease, then the portion of the rent that is attributable to personal property
does not qualify as "rent from real property." The amount of rent attributable
to personal property is that amount which bears the same ratio to total rent
for the taxable year as the average of the adjusted tax bases of the personal
property at the beginning and end of the year bears to the average of the
aggregate adjusted tax bases of both the real and personal property at the
beginning and end of such year. Host REIT has represented that, with respect
to each Lease that includes a lease of items of personal property, the amount
of rent attributable to personal property with respect to such Lease,
determined as set forth above, will not exceed 15% of the total rent due under
the Lease (except for several Leases where the rent attributable to personal
property, which would constitute non-qualifying income for purposes of the 75%
and 95% gross income tests, would not be material relative to the overall
gross income of Host REIT). Each Lease permits the Operating Partnership to
take certain measures, including requiring the Lessee to purchase certain
furniture, fixtures and equipment or to lease such property from a third party
(including a Non-Controlled Subsidiary), if necessary to ensure that all of
the rent attributable to personal property with respect to such Lease will
qualify as "rent from real property." In order to protect Host REIT's ability
to qualify as a REIT, the Operating Partnership, in connection with the REIT
Conversion, will sell to a Non-Controlled Subsidiary substantial personal
property associated with a number of Hotels currently owned by Host or being
acquired in connection with the REIT Conversion. The Non-Controlled Subsidiary
will separately lease all such personal property directly to the applicable
Lessee and will receive rental payments which Host REIT believes represents
the fair rental value of such personal property directly from the Lessees.
 
  If any of the Hotels were to be operated directly by the Operating
Partnership or a Partnership or Private Partnership as a result of a default
by a Lessee under the applicable Lease, such Hotel would constitute
foreclosure property until the close of the third tax year following the tax
year in which it was acquired (or for up to an additional three years if an
extension is granted by the IRS), provided that (i) the operating entity
conducts operations through an independent contractor (which might, but would
not necessarily in all circumstances, include Marriott International and its
subsidiaries) within 90 days after the date the Hotel is acquired as the
result of a default by a Lessee, (ii) the operating entity does not undertake
any construction on the foreclosed property other than completion of
improvements that were more than 10% complete before default became imminent,
and (iii) foreclosure was not regarded as foreseeable at the time the
applicable Partnership or Private Partnership entered into such Leases. For as
long as any of these Hotels constitute foreclosure property, the income from
the Hotels would be subject to tax at the maximum corporate rates, but it
would qualify under the 75% and 95% gross income tests. However, if any of
these Hotels does not constitute foreclosure property at any time in the
future, income earned from the disposition or operation of such property will
not qualify under the 75% and 95% gross income tests.
 
  "Interest" generally will not qualify under the 75% or 95% gross income
tests if it depends in whole or in part on the income or profits of any
person. However, interest will not fail to so qualify solely by reason of
being based upon a fixed percentage or percentages of receipts or sales. Host
REIT does not expect to derive significant amounts of interest that will not
qualify under the 75% and 95% gross income tests.
 
  The Non-Controlled Subsidiaries will hold various assets contributed by Host
and its subsidiaries to the Operating Partnership, the ownership of which by
the Operating Partnership might jeopardize Host REIT's status as a REIT. These
assets primarily will consist of partnership or other interests in Hotels that
are not leased and certain foreign hotels in which Host owns interests. In
addition, as described above, the Operating Partnership
 
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will sell to a Non-Controlled Subsidiary approximately $200 million in value
of personal property associated with certain Hotels, in order to facilitate
Host REIT's compliance with the 15% Personal Property Test. The Operating
Partnership will own 100% of the nonvoting stock of each Non-Controlled
Subsidiary but none of the voting stock (or control) of that Non-Controlled
Subsidiary. Each Non-Controlled Subsidiary is taxable as a regular "C"
corporation. The Operating Partnership's share of any dividends received from
a Non-Controlled Subsidiary should qualify for purposes of the 95% gross
income test, but not for purposes of the 75% gross income test. The Operating
Partnership does not anticipate that it will receive sufficient dividends from
the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries to cause it to exceed the limit on non-
qualifying income under the 75% gross income test.
 
  Given the magnitude and scope of Host's existing operations, Host REIT
inevitably will have some gross income from various sources (including, but
not limited to, "safe harbor" leases, the operation of the Hotel in
Sacramento, minority partnership interests in partnerships that own hotels
that are not leased under leases that produce rents qualifying as "rents from
real property" and rent attributable to personal property at a few Hotels that
does not satisfy the 15% Personal Property Test) that fails to constitute
qualifying income for purposes of one or both of the 75% or 95% gross income
tests. Host REIT, however, believes that, even taking into account the
anticipated sources of non-qualifying income, its aggregate gross income from
all sources will satisfy the 75% and 95% gross income tests applicable to
REITs for each taxable year commencing subsequent to the date of the REIT
Conversion.
 
  If Host REIT fails to satisfy one or both of the 75% or 95% gross income
tests for any taxable year, it may nevertheless qualify as a REIT for such
year if it is entitled to relief under certain provisions of the Code. These
relief provisions will be generally available if Host REIT's failure to meet
such tests was due to reasonable cause and not due to willful neglect, Host
REIT attaches a schedule of the sources of its income to its federal income
tax return and any incorrect information on the schedule was not due to fraud
with intent to evade tax. It is not possible, however, to state whether in all
circumstances Host REIT would be entitled to the benefit of these relief
provisions. For example, if Host REIT fails to satisfy the gross income tests
because nonqualifying income that Host REIT intentionally incurs exceeds the
limits on such income, the IRS could conclude that Host REIT's failure to
satisfy the tests was not due to reasonable cause. If these relief provisions
are inapplicable to a particular set of circumstances involving Host REIT,
Host REIT will not qualify as a REIT. As discussed above in "--General," even
if these relief provisions apply, a tax would be imposed with respect to the
excess net income.
 
  Any gain realized by Host REIT on the sale of any property held as inventory
or other property held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course
of business (including Host REIT's share of any such gain realized by the
Operating Partnership) will be treated as income from a "prohibited
transaction" that is subject to a 100% penalty tax. Such prohibited
transaction income may also have an adverse effect upon Host REIT's ability to
satisfy the income tests for qualification as a REIT. Under existing law,
whether property is held as inventory or primarily for sale to customers in
the ordinary course of a trade or business is a question of fact that depends
upon all the facts and circumstances with respect to the particular
transaction. The Operating Partnership intends that both it and the
Partnerships and Private Partnerships will hold the Hotels for investment with
a view to long-term appreciation, to engage in the business of acquiring and
owning the Hotels (and other hotels) and to make such occasional sales of the
Hotels as are consistent with the Operating Partnership's investment
objectives. There can be no assurance, however, that the IRS might not contend
that one or more of such sales is subject to the 100% penalty tax.
 
  Asset Tests Applicable to REITs. Host REIT, at the close of each quarter of
its taxable year, must also satisfy three tests relating to the nature of its
assets. First, at least 75% of the value of Host REIT's total assets must be
represented by real estate assets, including for this purpose (i) its
allocable share of real estate assets held by partnerships in which Host REIT
owns an interest (including its allocable share of the assets held through the
Operating Partnership) and (ii) stock or debt instruments held for not more
than one year purchased with the proceeds of a stock offering or long-term (at
least five years) debt offering of Host REIT, cash, cash items and government
securities. Second, not more than 25% of Host REIT's total assets may be
represented by securities
 
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other than those in the 75% asset class. Third, of the investments included in
the 25% asset class, the value of any one issuer's securities owned by Host
REIT may not exceed 5% of the value of Host REIT's total assets and Host REIT
may not own more than 10% of any one issuer's outstanding voting securities.
 
  The Operating Partnership does not own any of the voting stock of a Non-
Controlled Subsidiary but it will own 100% of the nonvoting stock of each Non-
Controlled Subsidiary. The Operating Partnership may also own nonvoting stock,
representing substantially all of the equity, in other corporate entities that
serve as partners or members in the various entities that hold title to the
Hotels. Host REIT will represent, however, that neither Host REIT, the
Operating Partnership nor any of the Hotel Partnerships or Subsidiary
Partnerships will own more than 10% of the voting securities of any entity
that would be treated as a corporation for federal income tax purposes. In
addition, Host REIT and its senior management believe, and Host REIT will
represent, that the securities of any one issuer owned by Host REIT, the
Operating Partnership, the Partnerships and Private Partnerships and any
Subsidiary Partnerships (including Host REIT's pro rata share of the value of
the securities of each Non-Controlled Subsidiary) will not exceed 5% of the
total value of Host REIT's assets. There can be no assurance, however, that
the IRS might not contend that the value of such securities exceeds the 5%
value limitation or that nonvoting stock of a Non-Controlled Subsidiary or
another corporate entity owned by the Operating Partnership should be
considered "voting stock" for this purpose.
 
  After initially meeting the asset tests at the close of any quarter, Host
REIT will not lose its status as a REIT for failure to satisfy the asset tests
at the end of a later quarter solely by reason of changes in asset values. If
the failure to satisfy the asset tests results from an acquisition of
securities or other property during a quarter (including, for example, as a
result of Host REIT increasing its interest in the Operating Partnership as a
result of the exercise of the Unit Redemption Right or an additional capital
contribution of proceeds from an offering of Host REIT Common Stock by Host
REIT), the failure can be cured by disposition of sufficient nonqualifying
assets within 30 days after the close of that quarter. Host REIT intends to
maintain adequate records of the value of its assets to ensure compliance with
the asset tests and to take such other actions within 30 days after the close
of any quarter as may be required to cure any noncompliance. If Host REIT
fails to cure noncompliance with the asset tests within such time period, Host
REIT would cease to qualify as a REIT.
 
  Clinton Administration's Proposed Changes to REIT Asset Test. The Clinton
Administration's fiscal year 1999 budget proposal, announced on February 2,
1998, includes a proposal to amend the 10% voting securities test. The
proposal would require a REIT to own no more than 10% of the vote or value of
all classes of stock of any corporation (except for qualified REIT
subsidiaries or corporations that qualify as REITs). Corporations (referred to
herein as "subsidiary corporations") existing prior to the effective date of
the proposal generally would be "grandfathered"; i.e., the REIT would be
subject to the existing 10% voting securities test (described above) with
respect to grandfathered subsidiary corporations. However, such
"grandfathered" status would terminate with respect to a subsidiary
corporation if the subsidiary corporation engaged in a new trade or business
or acquired substantially new assets.
 
  Because the Operating Partnership will own 100% of the nonvoting stock of
each Non-Controlled Subsidiary, and Host REIT will be deemed to own an
interest in each Non-Controlled Subsidiary equal to its proportionate interest
in the Operating Partnership, Host REIT would not satisfy the proposed 10%
value limitation with respect to any of the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries.
Whether any of the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries would qualify as a
grandfathered subsidiary corporation as the proposal is currently drafted
would depend upon the effective date of the proposal (which is not yet known).
If a Non-Controlled Subsidiary otherwise eligible for "grandfathered" status
were to engage in a new trade or business or were to acquire substantial new
assets, or if Host REIT were to make a capital contribution to a Non-
Controlled Subsidiary otherwise eligible for "grandfathered" status, its
"grandfathered" status would terminate and Host REIT would fail to qualify as
a REIT. Moreover, Host REIT would not be able to own, directly or indirectly,
more than 10% of the vote or value of any subsidiary corporation formed or
acquired after the effective date of the proposal. Thus, the proposal, if
enacted, would materially impede Host REIT's ability to engage in new third-
party management or similar activities (and, if enacted prior to the REIT
Conversion, might materially impair Host's ability to complete the REIT
Conversion.)
 
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  Annual Distribution Requirements Applicable to REITs. Host REIT, in order to
qualify as a REIT, is required to distribute dividends (other than capital
gain dividends) to its stockholders in an amount at least equal to (i) the sum
of (a) 95% of Host REIT's REIT taxable income (computed without regard to the
dividends paid deduction and Host REIT's net capital gain) and (b) 95% of the
net income (after tax), if any, from foreclosure property, minus (ii) the sum
of certain items of noncash income. In addition, if Host REIT disposes of any
Built-In Gain Asset during its Recognition Period, Host REIT will be required,
pursuant to Treasury Regulations which have not yet been promulgated, to
distribute at least 95% of the Built-In Gain (after tax), if any, recognized
on the disposition of such asset. See "--General" above for a discussion of
"Built-In Gain Assets." Such distributions must be paid in the taxable year to
which they relate, or in the following taxable year if declared before Host
REIT timely files its tax return for such year and if paid on or before the
first regular dividend payment date after such declaration. Host REIT intends
to make timely distributions sufficient to satisfy these annual distribution
requirements. In this regard, the Partnership Agreement authorizes Host REIT,
as general partner, to take such steps as may be necessary to cause the
Operating Partnership to distribute to its partners an amount sufficient to
permit Host REIT to meet these distribution requirements.
 
  To the extent that Host REIT does not distribute all of its net capital gain
or distributes at least 95%, but less than 100%, of its REIT taxable income,
as adjusted, it will be subject to tax thereon at regular ordinary and capital
gain corporate tax rates. Host REIT, however, may designate some or all of its
retained net capital gain, so that, although the designated amount will not be
treated as distributed for purposes of this tax, a stockholder would include
its proportionate share of such amount in income, as capital gain, and would
be treated as having paid its proportionate share of the tax paid by Host REIT
with respect to such amount. The stockholder's basis in its Host REIT Common
Stock would be increased by the amount the stockholder included in income and
decreased by the amount of the tax the stockholder is treated as having paid.
Host REIT would make an appropriate adjustment to its earnings and profits.
For a more detailed description of the federal income tax consequences to a
stockholder of such a designation, see "--Taxation of Taxable U.S.
Stockholders Generally."
 
  There is a significant possibility that Host REIT's REIT taxable income will
exceed its cash flow (due in part to certain "non-cash" or "phantom" income
expected to be taken into account in computing Host REIT's REIT taxable
income). Host REIT anticipates, however, that it will generally have
sufficient cash or liquid assets to enable it to satisfy the distribution
requirements described above. It is possible, however, that Host REIT, from
time to time, may not have sufficient cash or other liquid assets to meet
these distribution requirements. In such event, in order to meet the
distribution requirements, Host REIT may find it necessary to arrange for
short-term, or possibly long-term, borrowings to fund required distributions
and/or to pay dividends in the form of taxable stock dividends.
 
  Host REIT intends to calculate its REIT taxable income based upon the
conclusion that the Hotel Partnerships, the Subsidiary Partnerships or the
Operating Partnership, as applicable, is the owner of the Hotels for federal
income tax purposes. As a result, Host REIT expects that the depreciation
deductions with respect to the Hotels will reduce its REIT taxable income.
This conclusion is consistent with the conclusion above that the Leases will
be treated as true leases for federal income tax purposes. If the IRS were to
challenge successfully this position, in addition to failing in all likelihood
the 75% and 95% gross income tests described above, Host REIT also might be
deemed retroactively to have failed to meet the REIT distribution requirements
and would have to rely on the payment of a "deficiency dividend" in order to
retain its REIT status.
 
  Under certain circumstances, Host REIT may be able to rectify a failure to
meet the distribution requirement for a year by paying "deficiency dividends"
to stockholders in a later year, which may be included in Host REIT's
deduction for dividends paid for the earlier year. Thus, Host REIT may be able
to avoid being taxed on amounts distributed as deficiency dividends; however,
Host REIT would be required to pay interest based upon the amount of any
deduction taken for deficiency dividends.
 
  Furthermore, if Host REIT should fail to distribute during each calendar
year at least the sum of (i) 85% of its REIT ordinary income for such year,
(ii) 95% of its REIT capital gain income for such year, and (iii) any
undistributed taxable income from prior periods, Host REIT would be subject to
a 4% excise tax on the excess
 
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of such required distribution over the sum of amounts actually distributed and
amounts retained with respect to which the REIT pays federal income tax.
 
  Failure of Host REIT to Qualify as a REIT. If Host REIT fails to qualify for
taxation as a REIT in any taxable year, and if the relief provisions do not
apply, Host REIT will be subject to tax (including any applicable alternative
minimum tax) on its taxable income at regular corporate rates. Distributions
to stockholders in any year in which Host REIT fails to qualify will not be
deductible by Host REIT nor will they be required to be made. As a result,
Host REIT's failure to qualify as a REIT would significantly reduce the cash
available for distribution by Host REIT to its stockholders and could
materially reduce the value of the Host REIT Common Stock. In addition, if
Host REIT fails to qualify as a REIT, all distributions to stockholders will
be taxable as ordinary income, to the extent of Host REIT's current and
accumulated E&P, although subject to certain limitations of the Code,
corporate distributees may be eligible for the dividends received deduction
with respect to these distributions. Unless entitled to relief under specific
statutory provisions, Host REIT also will be disqualified from taxation as a
REIT for the four taxable years following the year during which qualification
was lost. It is not possible to state whether in all circumstances Host REIT
would be entitled to such statutory relief.
 
TAXATION OF TAXABLE U.S. STOCKHOLDERS GENERALLY
 
  Distributions by Host REIT. As long as Host REIT qualifies as a REIT,
distributions made by Host REIT out of its current or accumulated E&P (and not
designated as capital gain dividends) will constitute dividends taxable to its
taxable U.S. Stockholders as ordinary income. Such distributions will not be
eligible for the dividends received deduction in the case of U.S. Stockholders
that are corporations. To the extent that Host REIT makes distributions (not
designated as capital gain dividends) in excess of its current and accumulated
E&P, such distributions will be treated first as a tax-free return of capital
to each U.S. Stockholder, reducing the adjusted basis which such U.S.
Stockholder has in its Host REIT Common Stock for tax purposes by the amount
of such distribution (but not below zero), with distributions in excess of a
U.S. Stockholder's adjusted basis in its Host REIT Common Stock taxable as
capital gains (provided that the Host REIT Common Stock has been held as a
capital asset). Dividends declared by Host REIT in October, November or
December of any year and payable to a stockholder of record on a specified
date in any such month shall be treated as both paid by Host REIT and received
by the stockholder on December 31 of such year, provided that the dividend is
actually paid by Host REIT on or before January 31 of the following calendar
year.
 
  Distributions made by Host REIT that are properly designated by Host REIT as
capital gain dividends will be taxable to taxable non-corporate U.S.
Stockholders (i.e., individuals, estates or trusts) as gain from the sale or
exchange of a capital asset held for more than one year (to the extent that
they do not exceed Host REIT's actual net capital gain for the taxable year)
without regard to the period for which such non-corporate U.S. Stockholder has
held his Host REIT Common Stock. In the event that Host REIT designates any
portion of a dividend as a "capital gain dividend," a U.S. Stockholder's share
of such capital gain dividend would be an amount which bears the same ratio to
the total amount of dividends paid to such U.S. Stockholder for the year as
the aggregate amount designated as a capital gain dividend bears to the
aggregate amount of all dividends paid on all classes of shares for the year.
On November 10, 1997, the IRS issued Notice 97-64, which provides generally
that Host REIT may classify portions of its designated capital gain dividend
as (i) a 20% gain distribution (which would be taxable to non-corporate U.S.
Stockholders at a maximum rate of 20%), (ii) an unrecaptured Section 1250 gain
distribution (which would be taxable to non-corporate U.S. Stockholders at a
maximum rate of 25%) or (iii) a 28% rate gain distribution (which would be
taxable to non-corporate U.S. Stockholders at a maximum rate of 28%). If no
designation is made, the entire designated capital gain dividend will be
treated as a 28% rate gain distribution. Notice 97-64 provides that a REIT
must determine the maximum amounts that it may designate as 20% and 25% rate
capital gain dividends by performing the computation required by the Code as
if the REIT were an individual whose ordinary income were subject to a
marginal tax rate of at least 28%. Notice 97-64 further provides that
designations made by the REIT only will be effective to the extent that they
comply with Revenue Ruling 89-81, which requires that distributions made to
different classes of shares be composed proportionately of dividends of a
particular type. On July 22, 1998, as part of the IRS Restructuring Act, the
holding period requirement for the application of the 20% and 25% capital gain
tax rates was reduced to
 
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12 months from 18 months for sales of capital gain assets on or after January
1, 1998. Although Notice 97-64 will apply to sales of capital gain assets
after July 28, 1997 and before January 1, 1998, it is expected that the IRS
will issue clarifying guidance (most likely applying the same principles set
forth in Notice 97-64) regarding a REIT's designation of capital gain
dividends in light of the new holding period requirements. For a discussion of
the capital gain tax rates applicable to non-corporate U.S. Stockholders, see
"--1997 Act and IRS Restructuring Act Changes to Capital Gain Taxation" below.
 
  Distributions made by Host REIT that are properly designated by Host REIT as
capital gain dividends will be taxable to taxable corporate U.S. Stockholders
as long-term gain (to the extent that they do not exceed Host REIT's actual
net capital gain for the taxable year) at a maximum rate of 35% without regard
to the period for which such corporate U.S. Stockholder has held its Host REIT
Common Stock. Such U.S. Stockholders may, however, be required to treat up to
20% of certain capital gain dividends as ordinary income.
 
  U.S. Stockholders may not include in their individual income tax returns any
net operating losses or capital losses of Host REIT. Instead, such losses
would be carried over by Host REIT for potential offset against future income
(subject to certain limitations). Distributions made by Host REIT and gain
arising from the sale or exchange by a U.S. Stockholder of Host REIT Common
Stock will not be treated as passive activity income, and, as a result, U.S.
Stockholders generally will not be able to apply any "passive losses" against
such income or gain. In addition, taxable distributions from Host REIT
generally will be treated as investment income for purposes of the investment
interest limitation. Capital gain dividends and capital gains from the
disposition of shares (including distributions treated as such), however, will
be treated as investment income only if the U.S. Stockholder so elects, in
which case such capital gains will be taxed at ordinary income rates.
 
  Host REIT will notify stockholders after the close of its taxable year as to
the portions of distributions attributable to that year that constitute
ordinary income, return of capital and capital gain. Host REIT may designate
(by written notice to its stockholders) its net capital gain so that with
respect to retained net capital gains, a U.S. Stockholder would include its
proportionate share of such gain in income, as long-term capital gain, and
would be treated as having paid its proportionate share of the tax paid by
Host REIT with respect to the gain. The U.S. Stockholder's basis in its Host
REIT Common Stock would be increased by its share of such gain and decreased
by its share of such tax. With respect to such long-term capital gain of a
U.S. Stockholder that is an individual or an estate or trust, the IRS, as
described above in this section, has authority to issue regulations that could
apply the special tax rate applicable generally to the portion of the long-
term capital gains of an individual or an estate or trust attributable to
deductions for depreciation taken with respect to depreciable real property.
IRS Notice 97-64, described above in this section, did not address the
taxation of non-corporate REIT stockholders with respect to retained net
capital gains.
 
  Sales of Host REIT Common Stock. Upon any sale or other disposition of Host
REIT Common Stock, a U.S. Stockholder will recognize gain or loss for federal
income tax purposes in an amount equal to the difference between (i) the
amount of cash and the fair market value of any property received on such sale
or other disposition and (ii) the holder's adjusted basis in such Host REIT
Common Stock for tax purposes. Such gain or loss will be capital gain or loss
if the Host REIT Common Stock have been held by the U.S. Stockholder as a
capital asset. In the case of a U.S. Stockholder who is an individual or an
estate or trust, such gain or loss will be long-term capital gain or loss (and
any such long-term capital gain shall be subject to the maximum capital gain
rate of 20%). In the case of a U.S. Stockholder that is a corporation, such
gain or loss will be long-term capital gain or loss if such shares have been
held for more than one year (and any such capital gain shall be subject to the
maximum capital gain rate of 35%). In general, any loss recognized by a U.S.
Stockholder upon the sale or other disposition of Host REIT Common Stock that
have been held for six months or less (after applying certain holding period
rules) will be treated as a long-term capital loss, to the extent of
distributions received by such U.S. Stockholder from Host REIT that were
required to be treated as long-term capital gains.
 
  1997 Act and IRS Restructuring Act Changes to Capital Gain Taxation. The
1997 Act altered the taxation of capital gain income. Under the 1997 Act,
individuals, trusts and estates that hold certain investments for more than 18
months may be taxed at a maximum long-term capital gain rate of 20% on the
sale or exchange of those
 
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investments. Individuals, trusts and estates that hold certain assets for more
than one year but not more than 18 months may be taxed at a maximum long-term
capital gain rate of 28% on the sale or exchange of those investments. The
1997 Act also provides a maximum rate of 25% for "unrecaptured Section 1250
gain" for individuals, trusts and estates, special rules for "qualified 5-year
gain" and other changes to prior law. The recently enacted IRS Restructuring
Act, however, reduced the holding period requirement established by the 1997
Act for the application of the 20% and 25% capital gain tax rates to 12 months
from 18 months for sales of capital gain assets after December 31, 1997. The
1997 Act allows the IRS to prescribe regulations on how the 1997 Act's capital
gain rates will apply to sales of capital assets by "pass-through entities"
(including REITs, such as Host REIT) and to sales of interests in "pass-
through entities." For a discussion of the rules under the 1997 Act that apply
to the taxation of distributions by Host REIT to its stockholders that are
designated by Host REIT as "capital gain dividends," see "--Distributions by
Host REIT" above. Stockholders are urged to consult with their own tax
advisors with respect to the rules contained in the 1997 Act and the IRS
Restructuring Act.
 
BACKUP WITHHOLDING FOR HOST REIT DISTRIBUTIONS
 
  Host REIT will report to its U.S. Stockholders and the IRS the amount of
dividends paid during each calendar year and the amount of tax withheld, if
any. Under the backup withholding rules, a U.S. Stockholder may be subject to
backup withholding at the rate of 31% with respect to dividends paid unless
such holder (a) is a corporation or comes within certain other exempt
categories and, when required, demonstrates this fact or (b) provides a
taxpayer identification number, certifies as to no loss of exemption from
backup withholding and otherwise complies with applicable requirements of the
backup withholding rules. A U.S. Stockholder that does not provide Host REIT
with a correct taxpayer identification number may also be subject to penalties
imposed by the IRS. Any amount paid as backup withholding will be creditable
against the stockholder's income tax liability. In addition, Host REIT may be
required to withhold a portion of its capital gain distributions to any U.S.
Stockholders who fail to certify their non-foreign status to Host REIT. See
"--Taxation of Non-U.S. Stockholders."
 
TAXATION OF TAX-EXEMPT STOCKHOLDERS OF HOST REIT
 
  The IRS has ruled that amounts distributed as dividends by a qualified REIT
do not constitute unrelated business taxable income ("UBTI") when received by
a tax-exempt entity. Based on that ruling, provided that a tax-exempt
stockholder (except certain tax-exempt stockholders described below) has not
held its Host REIT Common Stock as "debt financed property" within the meaning
of the Code and such Host REIT Common Stock are not otherwise used in a trade
or business, the dividend income from Host REIT will not be UBTI to a tax-
exempt stockholder. Similarly, income from the sale of Host REIT Common Stock
will not constitute UBTI unless such tax-exempt stockholder has held such Host
REIT Common Stock as "debt financed property" within the meaning of the Code
or has used the Host REIT Common Stock in a trade or business.
 
  For tax-exempt stockholders that are social clubs, voluntary employee
benefit associations, supplemental unemployment benefit trusts and qualified
group legal services plans exempt from federal income taxation under Code
Sections 501 (c)(7), (c)(9), (c)(17) and (c)(20), respectively, income from an
investment in Host REIT will constitute UBTI unless the organization is
properly able to deduct amounts set aside or placed in reserve for certain
purposes so as to offset the income generated by its investment in Host REIT.
Such prospective stockholders should consult their own tax advisors concerning
these "set aside" and reserve requirements.
 
  Notwithstanding the above, however, the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of
1993 (the "1993 Act") provides that, effective for taxable years beginning in
1994, a portion of the dividends paid by a "pension held REIT" shall be
treated as UBTI as to any trust which (i) is described in Section 401(a) of
the Code, (ii) is tax-exempt under Section 501(a) of the Code and (iii) holds
more than 10% (by value) of the interests in the REIT. Tax-exempt pension
funds that are described in Section 401(a) of the Code are referred to below
as "qualified trusts."
 
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  A REIT is a "pension held REIT" if (i) it would not have qualified as a REIT
but for the fact that Section 856(h)(3) of the Code (added by the 1993 Act)
provides that stock owned by qualified trusts shall be treated, for purposes
of the "not closely held" requirement, as owned by the beneficiaries of the
trust (rather than by the trust itself) and (ii) either (a) at least one such
qualified trust holds more than 25% (by value) of the interests in the REIT or
(b) one or more such qualified trusts, each of which owns more than 10% (by
value) of the interests in the REIT, hold in the aggregate more than 50% (by
value) of the interests in the REIT. The percentage of any REIT dividend
treated as UBTI is equal to the ratio of (i) the UBTI earned by the REIT
(treating the REIT as if it were a qualified trust and therefore subject to
tax on UBTI) to (ii) the total gross income of the REIT. A de minimis
exception applies where the percentage is less than 5% for any year. The
provisions requiring qualified trusts to treat a portion of REIT distributions
as UBTI will not apply if the REIT is able to satisfy the "not closely held"
requirement without relying upon the "look-through" exception with respect to
qualified trusts.
 
  Based on the anticipated ownership of Host REIT Common Stock immediately
following the REIT Conversion and as a result of certain limitations on
transfer and ownership of Host REIT Common Stock contained in the Host REIT
Charter, Host REIT does not expect to be classified as a "pension held REIT."
 
TAXATION OF NON-U.S. STOCKHOLDERS
 
  The rules governing federal income taxation of the ownership and disposition
of Host REIT Common Stock by Non-U.S. Stockholders are complex and no attempt
is made herein to provide more than a brief summary of such rules.
Accordingly, the discussion does not address all aspects of federal income tax
and does not address state, local or foreign tax consequences that may be
relevant to a Non-U.S. Stockholder in light of its particular circumstances.
In addition, this discussion is based on current law, which is subject to
change, and assumes that Host REIT qualifies for taxation as a REIT.
Prospective Non-U.S. Stockholders should consult with their own tax advisers
to determine the impact of federal, state, local and foreign income tax laws
with regard to an investment in Host REIT Common Stock, including any
reporting requirements.
 
  Distributions by Host REIT. Distributions by Host REIT to a Non-U.S.
Stockholder that are neither attributable to gain from sales or exchanges by
Host REIT of United States real property interests nor designated by Host REIT
as capital gains dividends will be treated as dividends of ordinary income to
the extent that they are made out of current or accumulated E&P of Host REIT.
Such distributions ordinarily will be subject to withholding of United States
federal income tax on a gross basis (that is, without allowance of deductions)
at a 30% rate or such lower rate as may be specified by an applicable income
tax treaty, unless the dividends are treated as effectively connected with the
conduct by the Non-U.S. Stockholder of a United States trade or business.
Under certain treaties, however, lower withholding rates generally applicable
to dividends do not apply to dividends from a REIT, such as Host REIT. Certain
certification and disclosure requirements must be satisfied to be exempt from
withholding under the effectively connected income exemption. Dividends that
are effectively connected with such a trade or business will be subject to tax
on a net basis (that is, after allowance of deductions) at graduated rates, in
the same manner as U.S. Stockholders are taxed with respect to such dividends
and are generally not subject to withholding. Any such dividends received by a
Non-U.S. Stockholder that is a corporation may also be subject to an
additional branch profits tax at a 30% rate or such lower rate as may be
specified by an applicable income tax treaty. Host REIT expects to withhold
United States income tax at the rate of 30% on any distribution made to a Non-
U.S. Stockholder unless (i) a lower treaty rate applies and any required form
or certification evidencing eligibility for that lower rate is filed with Host
REIT or (ii) a Non-U.S. Stockholder files an IRS Form 4224 with Host REIT
claiming that the distribution is effectively connected income.
 
  Distributions in excess of current or accumulated E&P of Host REIT will not
be taxable to a Non-U.S. Stockholder to the extent that they do not exceed the
adjusted basis of the stockholder's Host REIT Common Stock, but rather will
reduce the adjusted basis of such Host REIT Common Stock. To the extent that
such distributions exceed the adjusted basis of a Non-U.S. Stockholder's Host
REIT Common Stock, they will give rise to gain from the sale or exchange of
its Host REIT Common Stock, the tax treatment of which is described below. As
a result of a legislative change made by the Small Business Job Protection Act
of 1996, it appears
 
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that Host REIT will be required to withhold 10% of any distribution in excess
of Host REIT's current and accumulated earnings and profits. Consequently,
although Host REIT intends to withhold at a rate of 30% on the entire amount
of any distribution (or a lower applicable treaty rate), to the extent that
Host REIT does not do so, any portion of a distribution not subject to
withholding at a rate of 30% (or a lower applicable treaty rate) would be
subject to withholding at a rate of 10%. However, the Non-U.S. Stockholder may
seek a refund of such amounts from the IRS if it subsequently determined that
such distribution was, in fact, in excess of current or accumulated E&P of
Host REIT, and the amount withheld exceeded the Non-U.S. Stockholder's United
States tax liability, if any, with respect to the distribution.
 
  Distributions to a Non-U.S. Stockholder that are designated by Host REIT at
the time of distribution as capital gain dividends (other than those arising
from the disposition of a United States real property interest) generally will
not be subject to United States federal income taxation, unless (i) the
investment in the Host REIT Common Stock is effectively connected with the
Non-U.S. Stockholder's United States trade or business, in which case the Non-
U.S. Stockholder will be subject to the same treatment as U.S. Stockholders
with respect to such gain (except that a stockholder that is a foreign
corporation may also be subject to the 30% branch profits tax, as discussed
above) or (ii) the Non-U.S. Stockholder is a nonresident alien individual who
is present in the United States for 183 days or more during the taxable year
and has a "tax home" in the United States, in which case the nonresident alien
individual will be subject to a 30% tax on the individual's capital gains.
 
  Pursuant to FIRPTA, distributions to a Non-U.S. Stockholder that are
attributable to gain from sales or exchanges by Host REIT of United States
real property interests (whether or not designated as capital gain dividends)
will cause the Non-U.S. Stockholder to be treated as recognizing such gain as
income effectively connected with a United States trade or business. Non-U.S.
Stockholders would thus generally be taxed at the same rates applicable to
U.S. Stockholders (subject to a special alternative minimum tax in the case of
nonresident alien individuals). Also, such gain may be subject to a 30% branch
profits tax in the hands of a Non-U.S. Stockholder that is a corporation, as
discussed above. Host REIT is required to withhold 35% of any such
distribution. That amount is creditable against the Non-U.S. Stockholder's
federal income tax liability.
 
  Although the law is not entirely clear on the matter, it appears that
amounts designated by Host REIT pursuant to the 1997 Act as undistributed
capital gains in respect of the Host REIT Common Stock held by U.S.
Stockholders (see "--Annual Distribution Requirements Applicable to REITs"
above) would be treated with respect to Non-U.S. Stockholders in the manner
outlined in the preceding two paragraphs for actual distributions by Host REIT
of capital gain dividends. Under that approach, the Non-U.S. Stockholders
would be able to offset as a credit against their United States federal income
tax liability resulting therefrom their proportionate share of the tax paid by
Host REIT on such undistributed capital gains (and to receive from the IRS a
refund to the extent their proportionate share of such tax paid by Host REIT
were to exceed their actual United States federal income tax liability).
 
  Sales of Host REIT Common Stock. Gain recognized by a Non-U.S. Stockholder
upon the sale or exchange of Host REIT Common Stock generally will not be
subject to United States taxation unless such shares constitute a "United
States real property interest" within the meaning of FIRPTA. The Host REIT
Common Stock will not constitute a "United States real property interest" so
long as Host REIT is a "domestically controlled REIT." A "domestically
controlled REIT" is a REIT in which at all times during a specified testing
period less than 50% in value of its stock is held directly or indirectly by
Non-U.S. Stockholders. Host REIT is unable at this time to predict whether it
will be a "domestically controlled REIT," and therefore whether the sale of
Host REIT Common Stock will be subject to taxation under FIRPTA. Moreover,
even if Host REIT initially qualifies as a "domestically controlled REIT,"
because the Host REIT Common Stock is expected to be publicly traded, no
assurance can be given that Host REIT would continue to be a "domestically
controlled REIT." Notwithstanding the foregoing, gain from the sale or
exchange of Host REIT Common Stock not otherwise subject to FIRPTA will be
taxable to a Non-U.S. Stockholder if the Non-U.S. Stockholder is a nonresident
alien individual who is present in the United States for 183 days or more
during the taxable year and has a "tax home"
 
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in the United States. In such case, the nonresident alien individual will be
subject to a 30% United States withholding tax on the amount of such
individual's gain.
 
  Even if Host REIT does not qualify as or ceases to be a "domestically
controlled REIT," gain arising from the sale or exchange by a Non-U.S.
Stockholder of Host REIT Common Stock would not be subject to United States
taxation under FIRPTA as a sale of a "United States real property interest" if
(i) the Host REIT Common Stock are "regularly traded" (as defined by
applicable Treasury Regulations) on an established securities market (e.g.,
the NYSE) and (ii) such Non-U.S. Stockholder owned 5% or less of the Host REIT
Common Stock throughout the five-year period ending on the date of the sale or
exchange. If gain on the sale or exchange of Host REIT Common Stock were
subject to taxation under FIRPTA, the Non-U.S. Stockholder would be subject to
regular United States income tax with respect to such gain in the same manner
as a taxable U.S. Stockholder (subject to any applicable alternative minimum
tax, a special alternative minimum tax in the case of nonresident alien
individuals and the possible application of the 30% branch profits tax in the
case of foreign corporations) and the purchaser of the Host REIT Common Stock
would be required to withhold and remit to the IRS 10% of the purchase price.
 
  Backup Withholding Tax and Information Reporting. Backup withholding tax
(which generally is a withholding tax imposed at the rate of 31% on certain
payments to persons that fail to furnish certain information under the United
States information reporting requirements) and information reporting will
generally not apply to distributions paid to Non-U.S. Stockholders outside the
United States that are treated as (i) dividends subject to the 30% (or lower
treaty rate) withholding tax discussed above, (ii) capital gain dividends or
(iii) distributions attributable to gain from the sale or exchange by Host
REIT of United States real property interests. As a general matter, backup
withholding and information reporting will not apply to a payment of the
proceeds of a sale of Host REIT Common Stock by or through a foreign office of
a foreign broker. Information reporting (but not backup withholding) will
apply, however, to a payment of the proceeds of a sale of Host REIT Common
Stock by a foreign office of a broker that (a) is a United States person, (b)
derives 50% or more of its gross income for certain periods from the conduct
of a trade or business in the United States or (c) is a "controlled foreign
corporation" (generally, a foreign corporation controlled by United States
stockholders) for United States tax purposes, unless the broker has
documentary evidence in its records that the holder is a Non-U.S. Stockholder
and certain other conditions are met or the stockholder otherwise establishes
an exemption. Payment to or through a United States office of a broker of the
proceeds of a sale of Host REIT Common Stock is subject to both backup
withholding and information reporting unless the stockholder certifies under
penalty of perjury that the stockholder is a Non-U.S. Stockholder, or
otherwise establishes an exemption. A Non-U.S. Stockholder may obtain a refund
of any amounts withheld under the backup withholding rules by filing the
appropriate claim for refund with the IRS.
 
  The IRS has recently finalized regulations regarding the withholding and
information reporting rules discussed above. In general, these regulations do
not alter the substantive withholding and information reporting requirements
but unify certification procedures and forms and clarify and modify reliance
standards. These regulations generally are effective for payments made after
December 31, 2000, subject to certain transition rules. Valid withholding
certificates that are held on December 31, 1999, will remain valid until the
earlier of December 31, 2000 or the date of expiration of the certificate
under rules currently in effect (unless otherwise invalidated due to changes
in the circumstances of the person whose name is on such certificate). A Non-
U.S. Stockholder should consult its own advisor regarding the effect of the
new Treasury Regulations.
 
TAX ASPECTS OF HOST REIT'S OWNERSHIP OF OP UNITS
 
  General. Substantially all of Host REIT's investments will be held through
the Operating Partnership, which will hold the Hotels either directly or
through the Partnerships or Private Partnerships (which, in turn, may hold
Hotels through certain Subsidiary Partnerships (as defined in the following
paragraph)). In general, partnerships are "pass-through" entities that are not
subject to federal income tax. Rather, partners are allocated their
proportionate shares of the items of income, gain, loss, deduction and credit
of a partnership, and are potentially subject to tax thereon, without regard
to whether the partners receive a distribution from the
 
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partnership. Host REIT will include in its income its proportionate share of
the foregoing partnership items for purposes of the various REIT income tests
and in the computation of its REIT taxable income. Moreover, for purposes of
the REIT asset tests, Host REIT will include its proportionate share of assets
held through the Operating Partnership, the Partnerships and Private
Partnerships, and any Subsidiary Partnerships. See "--Federal Income Taxation
of Host REIT Following the Merger--Ownership of Partnership Interests by a
REIT."
 
  Entity Classification. If the Operating Partnership or any of the
partnerships or limited liability companies in which the Operating Partnership
or any of the Partnerships or Private Partnerships will have a direct or
indirect interest (other than an indirect interest held through an entity
treated for federal income tax purposes as a corporation) following the REIT
Conversion (the "Subsidiary Partnerships") were treated as an association, the
entity would be taxable as a corporation and therefore would be subject to an
entity level tax on its income. In such a situation, the character of Host
REIT's assets and items of gross income would change and could preclude Host
REIT from qualifying as a REIT (see "--Federal Income Taxation of Host REIT
Following the Merger--Asset Tests Applicable to REITs" and "--Income Tests
Applicable to REITs").
 
  The entire discussion of the federal income tax consequences of the
ownership of Host REIT Common Stock is based on the Operating Partnership and
all of the Subsidiary Partnerships being classified as a partnership for
federal income tax purposes. Pursuant to Treasury Regulations under Section
7701 of the Code, a partnership will be treated as a partnership for federal
income tax purposes unless it elects to be treated as a corporation or would
be treated as a corporation because it is a "publicly traded partnership."
Neither the Operating Partnership nor any of the Subsidiary Partnerships will
elect to be treated as a corporation, and therefore, subject to the disclosure
below, each will be treated as a partnership for federal income tax purposes
(or if it has only one partner or member, disregarded entirely for federal
income tax purposes).
 
  Pursuant to Section 7704 of the Code, however, a partnership that does not
elect to be treated as a corporation nevertheless will be treated as a
corporation for federal income tax purposes if it is a "publicly traded
partnership," unless at least ninety percent (90%) of its income consists of
"qualifying income" within the meaning of that section. A "publicly traded
partnership" is any partnership (i) the interests in which are traded on an
established securities market or (ii) the interests in which are readily
tradable on a "secondary market (or the substantial equivalent thereof)." OP
Units will not be traded on an established securities market. There is a
significant risk, however, that after the Unit Redemption Right becomes
exercisable, such interests would be considered readily tradable on the
substantial equivalent of a secondary market.
 
  Hogan & Hartson has delivered to Host REIT and the Operating Partnership an
opinion stating that, based on certain factual assumptions and representations
described in the opinion, the Operating Partnership and each of the Subsidiary
Partnerships will be treated as a partnership (or disregarded) for federal
income tax purposes (and not treated as an association taxable as a
corporation). Hogan & Hartson is of the opinion that, based upon
representations by Host REIT and the Operating Partnership as to the expected
ownership and operations of the Operating Partnership, even if the Operating
Partnership were considered to be a publicly traded partnership because OP
Units were considered to be readily tradable on the substantial equivalent of
a secondary market, the proposed method of operation of the Operating
Partnership is such that it will qualify as a partnership for federal income
tax purposes because it will have sufficient "qualifying income." In this
regard, the income requirements generally applicable to REITs and the
definition of "qualifying income" under Section 7704 of the Code are similar
in most key respects. There is one significant difference, however, that is
relevant to the Operating Partnership. For a REIT, rent from a tenant does not
qualify as "rents from real property" if the REIT and/or one or more actual or
constructive owners of 10% or more of the REIT actually or constructively own
10% or more of the tenant; under Section 7704 of the Code, however, rent from
a tenant is not qualifying income if a partnership and/or one or more actual
or constructive owners of 5% or more of the partnership actually or
constructively own 10% or more of the tenant.
 
  A substantial majority of the Operating Partnership's income will come from
rent payments by the Lessees, which will be indirectly controlled subsidiaries
of Crestline. Accordingly, because The Blackstone Group, Host REIT and any
owner of 10% or more of Host REIT will own (or be deemed to own) 5% or more of
the Operating
 
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Partnership, if The Blackstone Group, Host REIT and/or any owner of 10% or
more of Host REIT were to own (or be deemed to own) collectively 10% or more
of Crestline, none of the rent from the Lessees would be qualifying income for
purposes of determining whether the Operating Partnership should be taxed as a
corporation. In order to avoid this result, the Crestline Articles of
Incorporation expressly provide that no person, including The Blackstone
Group, Host REIT and any owner of 10% or more of Host REIT, may own more than
9.8% by value of the equity in Crestline and the Crestline Articles of
Incorporation contain self-executing mechanisms intended to enforce this
prohibition. In addition, the Partnership Agreement prohibits any person or
entity (other than The Blackstone Group and Host REIT) from owning, actually
and/or constructively, more than 4.9% of the value of the Operating
Partnership, and the Host REIT Charter prohibits any person or entity
(including The Blackstone Group and the Marriott family and their affiliated
entities as a group) from owning, actually and/or constructively, more than
9.8% of the lesser of the number or value of the total outstanding shares of
Host REIT. Assuming that all of these prohibitions are enforced at all times
in accordance with their terms (as to which there can be no assurance), then
so long as the Operating Partnership's income is such that Host REIT could
meet the gross income tests applicable to REITs (see "--Federal Income
Taxation of Host REIT Following the Merger--Income Tests Applicable to REITs"
and "--Ownership of Partnership Interests by a REIT"), the Operating
Partnership's "qualifying income" should be sufficient for it to avoid being
classified as a corporation even if it were considered a publicly traded
partnership.
 
  If the Operating Partnership were taxable as a corporation, most, if not
all, of the tax consequences described herein would be inapplicable. In
particular, Host REIT would not qualify as a REIT because the value of Host
REIT's ownership interest in the Operating Partnership would exceed 5% of Host
REIT's assets and Host REIT would be considered to hold more than 10% of the
voting securities of another corporation (see "--Federal Income Taxation of
Host REIT Following the Merger--Asset Tests Applicable to REITs"), which would
adversely affect the value of the Host REIT Common Stock (see "--Federal
Income Taxation of Host REIT Following the Merger--Failure of Host REIT to
Qualify as a REIT"). However, as described above, Hogan & Hartson, counsel to
the Operating Partnership, is of the opinion that the proposed method of
operation of the Operating Partnership (as represented by the Operating
Partnership and Host) is such that it will be treated as a partnership for
federal income tax purposes and will not be subject to tax as a corporation or
an association taxable as a corporation. As noted previously, an opinion of
counsel does not bind the courts and no assurance can be provided that such
opinion will not be challenged by the IRS or will be sustained by a court if
so challenged.
 
  Allocations of Operating Partnership Income, Gain, Loss and Deduction. The
Partnership Agreement provides that if the Operating Partnership operates at a
net loss, net losses shall be allocated to Host REIT and the limited partners
in proportion to their respective percentage ownership interests in the
Operating Partnership, provided that net losses that would have the effect of
creating a deficit balance in a limited partner's capital account (as
specially adjusted for such purpose) ("Excess Losses") will be reallocated to
Host REIT, as general partner of the Operating Partnership. The Partnership
Agreement also provides that, if the Operating Partnership operates at a net
profit, net income shall be allocated first to Host REIT to the extent of
Excess Losses with respect to which Host REIT has not previously been
allocated net income and any remaining net income shall be allocated in
proportion to the respective percentage ownership interests of Host REIT and
the limited partners. Finally, the Partnership Agreement provides that if the
Operating Partnership has preferred units outstanding, income will first be
allocated to such preferred units to the extent necessary to reflect and
preserve the economic rights associated with such preferred units.
 
  Although a partnership agreement will generally determine the allocation of
income and loss among partners, such allocations will be disregarded for tax
purposes if they do not comply with the provisions of Section 704(b) of the
Code and the Treasury Regulations promulgated thereunder. Generally, Section
704(b) and the Treasury Regulations promulgated thereunder require that
partnership allocations respect the economic arrangement of the partners.
 
  If an allocation is not recognized for federal income tax purposes, the item
subject to the allocation will be reallocated in accordance with the partners'
interests in the partnership, which will be determined by taking into
 
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account all of the facts and circumstances relating to the economic
arrangement of the partners with respect to such item. The allocations of
taxable income and loss provided for in the Partnership Agreement and the
partnership agreements for the Hotel Partnerships (and any Subsidiary
Partnerships) are intended to comply with the requirements of Section 704(b)
of the Code and the Treasury Regulations promulgated thereunder.
 
  Tax Allocations with Respect to the Hotels. Pursuant to Section 704(c) of
the Code, income, gain, loss and deduction attributable to appreciated or
depreciated property (such as the Hotels) that is contributed to a partnership
in exchange for an interest in the partnership must be allocated in a manner
such that the contributing partner is charged with, or benefits from,
respectively, the difference between the adjusted tax basis and the fair
market value of such property at the time of contribution (the "Book-Tax
Difference") associated with the property at the time of the contribution. The
Partnership Agreement requires that such allocations be made in a manner
consistent with Section 704(c) of the Code.
 
  In general, the partners of the Operating Partnership (including Host REIT)
who contributed depreciated assets having a Book-Tax Difference will be
allocated depreciation deductions for tax purposes that are lower than such
deductions would be if determined on a pro rata basis. Thus, the carryover
basis of the contributed assets in the hands of the Operating Partnership may
cause Host REIT to be allocated lower depreciation and other deductions, and
therefore to be effectively allocated more income, which might adversely
affect Host REIT's ability to comply with the REIT distribution requirements.
See "--Federal Income Taxation of Host REIT Following the Merger--Annual
Distribution Requirements Applicable to REITs". However, in light of the
complexity of the governing rules affecting the calculation and allocation of
depreciation with respect to properties contributed to a partnership,
particularly when a number of those properties are subject to the separate
adjustments required in connection with a technical termination under Section
708 of the Code, the number of Hotels that the Operating Partnership will be
acquiring in connection with the OP Contribution, the Partnership Mergers, and
the Blackstone Acquisition, and the impact on these calculations of other
outside events, including equity offerings by Host or Host REIT and other
acquisitions undertaken by Host, Host REIT or the Operating Partnership prior
to or in connection with the REIT Conversion, Host, Host REIT and the
Operating Partnership believe that it is impossible to predict with any degree
of precision the impact that the REIT Conversion will have on the future
depreciation allocable by the Operating Partnership to Host REIT.
 
  In addition, in the event of the disposition of any of the contributed
assets which have such a Book-Tax Difference, all income attributable to such
Book-Tax Difference generally will be allocated to such partners, even though
the proceeds of such sale would be allocated proportionately among all the
partners in the Operating Partnership (and likely would be retained by the
Operating Partnership, rather than distributed to holders of OP Units). Thus,
if the Operating Partnership were to sell a Hotel with a Book-Tax Difference
that was contributed to the Operating Partnership by Host or Host REIT
(including in connection with the OP Contribution), Host REIT generally would
be allocated all of the income attributable to such Book-Tax Difference, which
could exceed the economic or book income allocated to it as a result of such
sale. Such an allocation might cause Host REIT to recognize taxable income in
excess of cash proceeds, which might adversely affect Host REIT's ability to
comply with the REIT distribution requirements (and could subject Host REIT to
a corporate level tax on such gain to the extent the gain is recognized within
the 10-year period after the first day of Host REIT's first taxable year as a
REIT). See "--Federal Income Taxation of Host REIT Following the Merger--
Annual Distribution Requirements Applicable to REITs" and "--Federal Income
Taxation of Host REIT Following the Merger--General." It should be noted in
this regard that as the general partner of the Operating Partnership, Host
REIT will determine whether or not to sell a Hotel contributed to the
Operating Partnership by Host REIT.
 
  The Operating Partnership and Host REIT have determined to use generally the
traditional method, with a provision for a curative allocation of gain on sale
to the extent prior allocations of depreciation with respect to a specific
Hotel were limited by the "ceiling rule" applicable under the traditional
method, to account for Book-Tax Differences with respect to the Hotels
contributed to the Operating Partnership in connection with the OP
Contribution or the Partnership Mergers (although there may be certain
exceptions). This method is generally a more favorable method for accounting
for Book-Tax Differences from the perspective of those partners (including
Host REIT) receiving OP Units in exchange for property with a low basis
relative to value at the time
 
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of the OP Contribution and the Partnership Mergers and is a less favorable
method from the perspective of those partners contributing cash (or "high
basis" assets) to the Operating Partnership (including Host REIT, to the
extent it contributes cash to the Operating Partnership).
 
  With respect to any property purchased by the Operating Partnership
subsequent to the REIT Conversion, such property will initially have a tax
basis equal to its fair market value, and Section 704(c) of the Code will not
apply.
 
OTHER TAX CONSEQUENCES FOR HOST REIT AND ITS STOCKHOLDERS
 
  Host REIT and its stockholders may be subject to state or local taxation in
various state or local jurisdictions, including those in which it (through the
Operating Partnership) or they transact business or reside. The state and
local tax treatment of Host REIT and its stockholders may not conform to the
federal income tax consequences discussed above. Consequently, prospective
stockholders of Host REIT should consult their own tax advisors regarding the
effect of state and local tax laws on an investment in Host REIT.
 
  A portion of the cash to be used by Host REIT to fund distributions is
expected to come from each Non-Controlled Subsidiary through payments of
dividends on the shares of such corporation held by the Operating Partnership
(and, in some cases, interest on notes held by the Operating Partnership).
Each Non-Controlled Subsidiary will pay federal and state income tax at the
full applicable corporate rates on its taxable income computed without regard
to any deduction for dividends. To the extent that a Non-Controlled Subsidiary
is required to pay federal, state or local taxes, the cash otherwise available
for distribution by Host REIT to its stockholders will be reduced accordingly.
 
                                 LEGAL MATTERS
 
  Certain legal matters, including certain tax matters, will be passed upon
for Host and Host REIT by Hogan & Hartson. L.L.P.
 
                                    EXPERTS
 
  The financial statements and schedule of Host Marriott Corporation and Host
Marriott Hotels as of January 2, 1998 and January 3, 1997 and for each of the
three years in the period ended January 2, 1998, the financial statements of
HMC Senior Communities, Inc. as of January 2, 1998 and for the period June 21,
1997 (inception) through January 2, 1998, the balance sheet of Host Marriott,
L.P. as of June 19, 1998 and the balance sheet of HMC Merger Corporation as of
September 28, 1998 included in this Proxy Statement/Prospectus have been
audited by Arthur Andersen LLP, independent public accountants, as indicated
in their reports with respect thereto, and are included herein in reliance
upon the authority of said firm as experts in giving said reports.
 
                                 OTHER MATTERS
 
  The Board of Directors of Host knows of no other business to be presented at
the Special Meeting. In the event that other matters properly come before the
Special Meeting, the persons named as proxies will vote on them in accordance
with their best judgment.
 
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                             STOCKHOLDER PROPOSALS
 
  Each of the Host Bylaws and Host REIT Bylaws requires the 1999 Annual
Meeting to be held in May 1999. The Host Annual Meeting for 1999 (or, if the
Merger has been consummated, the Host REIT Annual Meeting for 1999) is
tentatively scheduled to be held on Thursday, May 13, 1999. Accordingly,
stockholder proposals submitted for presentation at the 1999 Annual Meeting of
Stockholders of Host REIT, in the event of the approval of the Agreement and
the consummation of the Merger, or the 1999 Annual Meeting of Stockholders of
Host, in the event that the Agreement is not approved by Host's stockholders
or the Merger is not otherwise consummated because other conditions have not
been satisfied, must be submitted in writing by any stockholder who meets the
requirements of the proxy rules under the Exchange Act by notice delivered or
mailed by first-class United States mail, postage prepaid, to the Corporate
Secretary, Host Marriott Corporation or HMC Merger Corporation, as the case
may be, 10400 Fernwood Road, Bethesda, Maryland 20817-1109 and must be
received no later than December 4, 1998 to be eligible for inclusion in the
proxy materials for that meeting. Any such notice shall set forth: (a) the
name and address of the stockholder and the text of the proposal to be
introduced; (b) the number of shares of Host Common Stock held of record,
owned beneficially and represented by proxy by such stockholder as of the date
of such notice; and (c) a representation that the stockholder intends to
appear in person or by proxy at the meeting to introduce the proposal
specified in the notice. Any stockholder proposal received after February 22,
1999 shall be considered untimely, regardless of whether it is submitted for
inclusion in the Company's proxy materials pursuant to Rule 14a-8 under the
Exchange Act or simply to notify the Company of the stockholder's intention to
introduce it for action at the meeting. The chairman of the meeting may refuse
to acknowledge the introduction of any stockholder proposals for which notice
is not provided in accordance with the foregoing procedures.
 
                             AVAILABLE INFORMATION
 
  Host is subject to the informational requirements of the Securities Exchange
Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"), and in accordance therewith
files reports, proxy statements and other information with the Securities and
Exchange Commission (the "Commission"). Such reports, proxy statements and
other information can be inspected and copied at the public reference
facilities maintained by the Commission at 450 Fifth Street, N.W., Washington,
D.C. 20549, and at the Commission's regional offices located at 75 Park Place,
New York, New York 10007 and 500 West Madison Street, Suite 1400, Chicago,
Illinois 60661-2511. Copies of such material may be obtained at prescribed
rates by writing the Commission, Public Reference Section, 450 Fifth Street,
N.W., Washington, D.C. 20549. The Commission maintains a Web site at
http://www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy and information statements and
other information regarding registrants, including Host, that file
electronically with the Commission. Host Common Stock is listed on the NYSE,
and reports, proxy statements and other information concerning Host may also
be inspected at the offices of the New York Stock Exchange, Inc., 20 Broad
Street, New York, New York 10005.
 
  Host REIT has filed with the Commission a registration statement (the
"Registration Statement," which term shall include any amendments thereto) on
Form S-4 under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"),
with respect to Host REIT Common Stock to be issued upon the consummation of
the Merger pursuant to the Agreement described herein, and this Proxy
Statement/Prospectus constitutes the Prospectus of Host REIT with respect to
such Host REIT Common Stock. This Proxy Statement/Prospectus does not contain
all the information set forth in the Registration Statement and the exhibits
thereto, certain parts of which are omitted in accordance with the rules and
regulations of the Commission, and to which reference is hereby made. For
further information, reference is hereby made to the Registration Statement
and the exhibits thereto.
 
  Statements contained in this Proxy Statement/Prospectus as to the contents
of any contract or other document which is filed as an exhibit to the
Registration Statement are not necessarily complete, and each such statement
is qualified in its entirety by reference to the full text of such contract or
document.
 
  Upon consummation of the REIT Conversion, Host REIT and the Operating
Partnership will be required to file reports and other information with the
Commission pursuant to the Exchange Act. In addition to applicable
 
                                      197

<PAGE>
 
legal or NYSE requirements, if any, holders of the Host REIT Common Stock will
receive annual reports containing audited financial statements with a report
thereon by Host REIT's and the Operating Partnership's independent public
accountants, and quarterly reports containing unaudited financial information
for each of the first three quarters of each fiscal year.
 
  IT IS IMPORTANT THAT PROXIES BE RETURNED PROMPTLY. THEREFORE, ALL
STOCKHOLDERS ARE URGED TO COMPLETE, SIGN, DATE AND RETURN THE ACCOMPANYING
FORM OF PROXY IN THE ENCLOSED ENVELOPE.
 
                                          By Order of The Board of Directors,
 
                                          CHRISTOPHER G. TOWNSEND
                                          Secretary
 
                                      198

<PAGE>
 
                                   GLOSSARY
 
  "100% Participation with No Notes Issued" means all Partnerships participate
in the Partnership Mergers and the REIT Conversion and no Notes are issued.
 
  "100% Participation with Notes Issued" means all Partnerships participate in
the Partnership Mergers and the REIT Conversion and every Limited Partner
elects to receive Notes.
 
  "15% Personal Property Test" means the test applied to determine whether a
REIT satisfies the requirement under the Code that, in order for rent
attributable to the lease of personal property to qualify as "rents from real
property," such rent must not account for more than 15% of the total rent
received under the lease of real and personal property.
 
  "1993 Act" means the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993.
 
  "1993 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement" means the Employee Benefits
and Other Employment Matters Allocation Agreement between Host and Marriott
International, as amended.
 
  "1995 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement" means the Employee Benefits
and Other Employment Matters Allocation Agreement entered into by Host and HM
Services that provides for the allocation of certain responsibilities with
respect to employee compensation, benefits and labor matters.
 
  "1997 Act" means the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997.
 
  "1998 Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement" means the Employee Benefits
and Other Employment Matters Allocation Agreement between Host, the Operating
Partnership and Crestline, to be entered into in connection with the REIT
Conversion.
 
  "Acquired Earnings" means undistributed earnings and profits of Host REIT
attributable to a "C" corporation taxable year (including accumulated
undistributed earnings and profits acquired from Host, some of which may have
resulted from either transactions undertaken in contemplation of the REIT
Conversion or the REIT Conversion itself).
 
  "Acquiring Person" means a person or group of affiliated or associated
persons.
 
  "ADA" means the Americans with Disabilities Act.
 
  "Agreement" means the Agreement and Plan of Merger dated    , 1998 by and
among Host, Host REIT and the Operating Partnership, a copy of which is
attached hereto as Appendix A.
 
  "Atlanta Marquis" means Atlanta Marriott Marquis II Limited Partnership, a
Delaware limited partnership, or, as the context may require, such entity
together with is subsidiaries, or any of such subsidiaries.
 
  "Available Cash" means net income plus depreciation and amortization and any
reduction in reserves and minus interest and principal payments on debt,
capital expenditures, any additions to reserves and other adjustments.
 
  "Beneficiary" means a qualified charitable organization selected by Host
REIT to be the beneficiary of a trust into which excess shares are to be
transferred pursuant to the Host REIT Charter.
 
  "Blackstone" means Blackstone Real Estate Acquisitions L.L.C.
 
  "Blackstone Acquisition" means the expected acquisition from The Blackstone
Entities of ownership of, or controlling interests in, twelve hotels and a
mortgage loan secured by a thirteenth hotel in exchange for OP Units, the
assumption of certain liabilities and other consideration, including up to 18%
of the shares of Crestline common stock, to the extent such acquisition is
consummated.
 
                                      199

<PAGE>
 
  "Blackstone Entities" means The Blackstone Group, a Delaware limited
partnership and a series of funds controlled by Blackstone Real Estate
Partners, a Delaware limited partnership.
 
  "Blackstone Hotels" means the twelve upscale and luxury full-service hotel
properties expected to be acquired by Host from the Blackstone Entities in the
Blackstone Acquisition.
 
  "Bond Refinancing" means the recently completed refinancing of $1.55 billion
of outstanding public bonds through offers to purchase such debt securities
for cash and a concurrent solicitation of consents to amend the terms of the
debt securities to facilitate the transactions constituting the REIT
Conversion.
 
  "Book-Tax Difference" means the difference between the fair market value of
property contributed to a partnership at the time of contribution and the
adjusted tax basis of such property at the time of such contribution.
 
  "Built-In Gain Asset" means an asset which has been acquired from a C
corporation in a transaction in which the basis of the asset in the hands of
Host REIT is determined by reference to the basis of the asset in the hands of
the C corporation.
 
  "Chain Services" mean services generally furnished on a central or regional
basis to the Hotels. Such services include the following: (i) the development
and operation of computer systems and reservation services, (ii) regional
management and administrative services, regional marketing and sales services,
regional training services, manpower development and relocation costs of
regional personnel and (iii) such additional central or regional services as
may from time to time be more efficiently performed on a regional or group
level.
 
  "Chicago Suites" means Mutual Benefit Chicago Marriott Suite Hotel Partners,
L.P., a Rhode Island limited partnership.
 
  "Code" means the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.
 
  "Commission" means the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.
 
  "Company" means Host (to the extent of its business and assets to be
contributed to the Operating Partnership) with respect to the period prior to
the REIT Conversion, and Host REIT and the Operating Partnership collectively
with respect to the period after the REIT Conversion.
 
  "Control share acquisition" means the acquisition of control shares, subject
to certain exceptions.
 
  "Control shares" means voting shares which, if aggregated with all other
such voting shares previously acquired by the acquiror or in respect of which
the acquiror is able to exercise or direct the exercise of voting power
(except solely by virtue of a revocable proxy), would entitle the acquiror to
exercise voting power in electing directors within one of the following ranges
of voting power: (i) one-fifth or more but less than one-third, (ii) one-third
or more but less than a majority or (iii) a majority or more of the voting
power. Control shares do not include shares the acquiring person is then
entitled to vote as a result of having previously obtained stockholder
approval.
 
  "Convertible Preferred Securities" means the 6 3/4% Convertible Quarterly
Income Preferred Securities issued by Host Marriott Financial Trust, with an
aggregate liquidation amount of $550 million, which are guaranteed on a
subordinated basis by, and convertible into the common stock of, Host.
 
  "CPI" means the Consumer Price Index.
 
  "Crestline" means Crestline Capital Corporation (formerly HMC Senior
Communities, Inc.), a Delaware corporation, or, as the context may require,
such entity together with the Lessees and its other subsidiaries or any of
them, which currently is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Host but will become a
separate public company as part of the REIT Conversion when Host or Host REIT
distributes the common stock of Crestline to its existing stockholders as part
of the Initial E&P Distribution.
 
                                      200

<PAGE>
 
  "Delaware Act" means the Delaware Revised Uniform Limited Partnership Act.
 
  "Desert Springs" means Desert Springs Marriott Limited Partnership, a
Delaware limited partnership, or, as the context may require, such entity
together with its subsidiaries, or any of such subsidiaries.
 
  "DGCL" means the Delaware General Corporation Law, as amended.
 
  "E&P" means earnings and profits.
 
  "Effective Date" means the date upon which the Reincorporation by means of
the Merger is consummated.
 
  "Effective Time" means the time at which the Articles of Merger with respect
to the Merger of Host with and into Host REIT is filed with the SDAT.
 
  "Election Right" means a nontransferable right entitling Host stockholders
to elect to receive either a specified dollar amount of cash or a specified
fraction of a share of Host Common Stock (or a share of Host REIT Common Stock
if the Merger has occurred).
 
  "Excess FF&E" means replacement FF&E that could cause the average tax basis
of the items of the Lessor's FF&E and other personal property that are leased
to the applicable Lessee to exceed 15% of the aggregate average tax basis of
the real and personal property subject to the applicable Lease.
 
  "Exchange Act" means the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.
 
  "FF&E" means furniture, fixtures and equipment.
 
  "FF&E Adjustment" means the amount by which the annual Minimum Rent would be
reduced in the event that the average tax basis of the items of the Lessor's
FF&E and other personal property that are leased to the applicable Lessee
could exceed 15% of the aggregate average tax basis of the real and personal
property subject to the applicable Lease.
 
  "FF&E Replacements" means FF&E to be acquired and certain routine repairs
that are normally capitalized to be performed in the next year.
 
  "FIRPTA" means the Foreign Investment in Real Property Tax Act of 1980.
 
  "Forum Group" means the Forum Group, Inc., which was acquired by Host on
June 21, 1997 from Marriott Senior Living Services, Inc., a subsidiary of
Marriott International. The Forum Group holds interests in 31 senior living
communities.
 
  "Full Participation Scenario" means the REIT Conversion occurs, all the
Partnerships participate and no Host REIT Common Stock or Notes are issued.
 
  "Funds From Operations" or "FFO" as defined by NAREIT means net income
computed in accordance with GAAP, excluding gains or losses from debt
restructuring and sales of properties, plus real estate related depreciation
and amortization, and after adjustments for unconsolidated partnerships and
joint ventures. FFO should not be considered as an alternative to net income,
operating profit, cash flows from operations or any other operating or
liquidity performance measure prescribed by GAAP. FFO is also not an indicator
of funds available to fund the Company's cash needs, including its ability to
make distributions. The Company's method of calculating FFO may be different
from methods used by other REITs and, accordingly, is not comparable to such
other REITs.
 
  "GAAP" means generally accepted accounting principles.
 
 
                                      201

<PAGE>
 
  "Gross Revenues" means proceeds from aggregate sales from a Hotel, including
room sales, food and beverage sales and telephone and other sales.
 
  "Hanover" means Hanover Marriott Limited Partnership, a Delaware limited
partnership.
 
  "HM Services" means Host Marriott Services Corporation.
 
  "HMH Properties" means HMH Properties, Inc.
 
  "Hogan & Hartson" means Hogan & Hartson L.L.P.
 
  "Host" means Host Marriott Corporation, a Delaware corporation, and either
the general partner or an affiliate of the general partner of each
Partnership, or, as the context may require, Host Marriott Corporation
together with its subsidiaries or any of such subsidiaries.
 
  "Host Bylaws" means Host's Amended Bylaws.
 
  "Host Certificate" means Host's Restated Certificate of Incorporation.
 
  "Host Common Stock" means a share of the common stock, par value $1.00 per
share, of Host.
 
  "Host Employee Trust" means the Host Marriott Employee Statutory Trust, a
Delaware statutory business trust, the beneficiaries of which with respect to
distributions of income are employees of Host REIT eligible to participate in
the Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan (excluding Directors of Host REIT and
certain other highly compensated employees). The Host Employee Trust and
possibly certain other investors will be the owners of the voting stock of the
Non-Controlled Subsidiaries.
 
  "Host REIT" means HMC Merger Corporation, a wholly-owned, newly formed
Maryland subsidiary of Host (to be renamed "Host Marriott Corporation" in
connection with the Merger), which was formed for the sole purpose of
effecting the Reincorporation by means of the Merger, and which will be the
sole general partner of the Operating Partnership, and the successor to Host,
or, as the context may require, HMC Merger Corporation and the Operating
Partnership collectively together with their subsidiaries or any of such
subsidiaries.
 
  "Host REIT Bylaws" means the bylaws of Host REIT attached to the Agreement
as Exhibit B.
 
  "Host REIT Charter" means the Articles of Incorporation of Host REIT as
expected to be in effect upon consummation of the Merger and the other
transactions comprising the REIT Conversion, attached to the Agreement as
Exhibit A.
 
  "Host REIT Common Stock" means a share of the common stock, par value $.01
per share, of Host REIT.
 
  "Host REIT Preferred Stock" means a share of the preferred stock, par value
$.01 per share of Host REIT.
 
  "Host REIT Right" means one preferred stock purchase right issued under the
Host REIT Rights Agreement.
 
  "Host Right" means the right issued under the Host Rights Agreement.
 
  "Host Rights Agreement" means the rights agreement dated as of February 3,
1989 between Marriott Corporation (the former name of Host) and the Bank of
New York.
 
  "Hotels" means the approximately 125 full-service hotels operating primarily
under the Marriott, Ritz-Carlton, Four Seasons, Swissotel and Hyatt brand
names in which the Company and its subsidiaries are expected initially to have
controlling interests or own outright following the REIT Conversion and the
Blackstone Acquisition.
 
                                      202

<PAGE>
 
  "Impermissible Tenant Service Income" means any amount charged to a tenant
for services rendered by Host REIT or its affiliates other than through an
independent contractor from whom Host REIT derives no revenue excluding for
these purposes services "usually or customarily rendered" in connection with
the rental of real property and not otherwise considered "rendered to the
occupant."
 
  "Initial E&P Distribution" means one or more taxable distributions by Host
or Host REIT to their stockholders in connection with the REIT Conversion
consisting of shares of common stock of Crestline and cash or other
consideration in an amount to be determined.
 
  "Interested Stockholder" means a person who owns 10% or more of the voting
power of a corporation's then outstanding shares of capital stock or his
affiliate.
 
  "IRS" means the Internal Revenue Service.
 
  "IRS Restructuring Act" means the Internal Revenue Service Restructuring and
Reform Act of 1998, which was signed into law on July 22, 1998.
 
  "Leases" means the lease agreements under which the Lessees will lease the
Hotels from the Operating Partnership.
 
  "Lessees" means the entities to which the Operating Partnership will lease
the Hotels and who will operate the Hotels under the existing long-term
Management Agreements and pay rent to the Operating Partnership.
 
  "LIBOR" means the London Interbank Offered Rate.
 
  "Limited Partners" means the limited partners, excluding those affiliated
with Host, of the Partnerships.
 
  "Management Agreements" means the existing long-term management agreements
pursuant to which the Managers manage the Hotels.
 
  "Managers" means the subsidiaries of Marriott International and other
companies who manage the Hotels on behalf of Host, the Partnerships or the
Private Partnerships (and following the REIT Conversion, on behalf of the
Lessees) pursuant to the existing Management Agreements.
 
  "Market Leasing Factor" means the amount used to determine the FF&E
Adjustment to Minimum Rent in the event that the average tax basis of the
items of the Lessor's FF&E and other personal property that are leased to the
applicable Lessee could exceed 15% of the aggregate average tax basis of the
real and personal property subject to the applicable Lease. The Market Leasing
Factor will be determined for the first two years under a Lease at the time
the Lease is executed. Each year thereafter, the Market Leasing Factor will be
determined by an independent valuation expert based upon the median of the
leasing rates of at least three nationally recognized companies engaged in the
business of leasing similar personal property.
 
  "Marriott International" means Marriott International, Inc., a Delaware
corporation.
 
  "Marriott International Purchase Right" means the right of Marriott
International to purchase up to 20% of each class of Host's outstanding voting
shares at the then fair market value upon the occurrence of certain change of
control events involving Host, which will continue in effect after the Merger,
subject to certain limitations intended to protect the REIT status of Host
REIT.
 
  "MDAH" means Marriott Diversified American Hotels, L.P., a Delaware limited
partnership.
 
  "Merger" means the proposed merger of Host with and into Host REIT, as
described in this Proxy Statement/Prospectus.
 
 
                                      203

<PAGE>
 
  "MGCL" means the Maryland General Corporation Law, as amended.
 
  "MHP" means Marriott Hotel Properties Limited Partnership, a Delaware
limited partnership, or, as the context may require, such entity together with
its subsidiaries, or any of such subsidiaries.
 
  "MHP2" means Marriott Hotel Properties II Limited Partnership, a Delaware
limited partnership, or, as the context may require, such entity together with
its subsidiaries, or any of such subsidiaries.
 
  "Minimum Rent" means a fixed dollar amount specified in each lease, less the
FF&E Adjustment.
 
  "NAREIT" means the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts,
Inc.
 
  "New Credit Facility" means the new $1.25 billion credit facility of the
Operating Partnership.
 
  "Non-Controlled Subsidiaries" means the one or more taxable corporations in
which the Operating Partnership will own 95% of the economic interest but no
voting stock and which will hold various assets contributed by Host and its
subsidiaries to the Operating Partnership, which assets, if owned directly by
the Operating Partnership, could jeopardize Host REIT's status as a REIT.
 
  "Non-U.S. Stockholders" means persons that are, for purposes of federal
income taxation, nonresident alien individuals, foreign corporations, foreign
partnerships or foreign estates or trusts.
 
  "Note" means an unsecured note of the Operating Partnership which a Limited
Partner may elect to receive in connection with the Partnership Mergers in
exchange for OP Units.
 
  "NYSE" means the New York Stock Exchange, Inc.
 
  "OP Contribution" means the contribution by Host of its wholly-owned full-
service Hotels, its interests in certain hotel partnerships and certain other
businesses and assets to the Operating Partnership in exchange for OP Units.
 
  "OP Units" means the limited partnership interests in the Operating
Partnership.
 
  "Operating Partnership" means Host Marriott, L.P., a Delaware limited
partnership, the sole general partner of which will be Host REIT, or, as the
context may require, such entity together with its subsidiaries, including the
Non-Controlled Subsidiaries, or any of them.
 
  "Ownership Limit" means the prohibition in the Host REIT Charter against
ownership, directly or indirectly or by virtue of the attribution provisions
of the Code, by any person or persons acting as a group of more than (i) 9.8%
of the lesser of the number or value of shares of Host REIT Common Stock
outstanding or (ii) 9.8% of the lesser of the number or value of the issued
and outstanding shares of any class or series of Host REIT preferred stock,
subject to waiver or modification by Host REIT in certain limited
circumstances and to certain limited exceptions for a holder of shares of Host
REIT Common Stock solely by reason of the Merger so long as such holder would
not own, directly or by attribution under the Code, more than 9.8% by value of
the outstanding capital stock of Host REIT after the Merger.
 
  "Ownership Limit Effective Time" means 12:01 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the
first day after the Effective Date.
 
  "Partnership" means any of the eight limited partnerships that own full-
service hotels in which Host or its subsidiaries are general partners (Atlanta
Marquis, Chicago Suites, Desert Springs, Hanover, MDAH, MHP, MHP2 or PHLP),
or, as the context may require, any such entity together with its
subsidiaries, or any of such subsidiaries.
 
  "Partnership Agreement" means the amended and restated agreement of limited
partnership of the Operating Partnership.
 
                                      204

<PAGE>
 
  "Partnership Mergers" means the acquisition by merger, if and to the extent
consummated, of up to eight of the Partnerships that own full-service hotels
in which Host or its subsidiaries are general partners in exchange for OP
Units (which may be exchanged for Host REIT Common Stock or Notes).
 
  "Percentage Rent" means an amount of rent based upon specified percentages
of aggregate sales (including room sales, food and beverage sales and
telephone and other sales) at each Hotel which is subject to a Lease.
 
  "Person" means an individual, corporation, partnership, limited liability
company, trust or other entity.
 
  "PHLP" means Potomac Hotel Limited Partnership, a Delaware limited
partnership.
 
  "Plan Assets" means the underlying assets of Host REIT which are deemed to
be assets of an investing ERISA Plan.
 
  "Plans" means, collectively, the Host Marriott Corporation 1997
Comprehensive Stock Incentive Plan, the Host Marriott Corporation Employee
Stock Purchase Plan, the Host Marriott Corporation Retirement and Savings Plan
and the Host Marriott Corporation Executive Deferred Compensation Plan for
Non-Employee Directors.
 
  "Private Partnership" means a partnership (other than a Partnership) or
limited liability company that owns one or more full-service Hotels and that,
prior to the REIT Conversion, is partially but not wholly-owned by Host or one
of its subsidiaries. The Private Partnerships are not participating in the
Partnership Mergers.
 
  "Private Partnership Transactions" means the acquisition of the partnership
interests from the Private Partnerships that own one or more full-service
hotels and that are partially but not wholly-owned by Host or one of its
subsidiaries in exchange for OP Units, if and to the extent such acquisitions
are consummated.
 
  "Prohibited Owner" means a Person holding record title to any shares in
excess of the Ownership Limit.
 
  "Prohibited Transferee" means a Person who would violate the Ownership Limit
or any other restriction in the Host REIT Charter because of a transfer of
shares of beneficial interest of Host REIT to such Person or any other event.
 
  "Proxy Statement/Prospectus" means this Proxy Statement/Prospectus, dated
October  , 1998, including the appendices attached hereto.
 
  "Recognition Period" means the ten-year period beginning on the date on
which a Built-In Gain Asset is acquired by Host REIT.
 
  "Record Date" means November  , 1998.
 
  "Reincorporation" means the reincorporation of Host from the State of
Delaware to the State of Maryland by means of the Merger.
 
  "REIT" means a real estate investment trust.
 
  "REIT Conversion" means (i) the OP Contribution, (ii) the Reincorporation by
means of the Merger, (iii) the Initial E&P Distribution, (iv) the recently
completed refinancing and amendment of the debt securities and certain credit
facilities of Host substantially in the manner described herein, (v) the
Partnership Mergers (if and to the extent consummated), (vi) the Private
Partnership Transactions (if and to the extent consummated), (vii) the
Blackstone Acquisition (if and to the extent consummated), (viii) the creation
and capitalization of the Non-Controlled Subsidiaries, (ix) the leasing of all
of the full-service Hotels to the Lessees and (x) such other related
transactions described in "The REIT Conversion" and such other steps occurring
prior to, substantially concurrent with or within a reasonable time after the
Effective Date, as Host may determine in its discretion to be necessary or
desirable to complete or facilitate the transactions contemplated herein or
otherwise to permit Host REIT to elect to be treated as a REIT for federal
income tax purposes.
 
                                      205

<PAGE>
 
  "Related Party Tenant" means a tenant in which Host REIT, or an actual or
constructive owner of 10% or more of Host REIT, actually or constructively
owns 10% or more of the interests.
 
  "Restructuring Transactions" means the OP Contribution and the
Reincorporation by means of the Merger.
 
  "REVPAR" means revenue per available room. REVPAR measures daily room
revenues generated on a per room basis by combining the average daily room
rate charged and the average daily occupancy achieved. REVPAR excludes food
and beverage and other ancillary revenues generated by the hotel.
 
  "Rights Distribution Date" means the earlier to occur of (i) 10 days
following the Stock Acquisition Date or (ii) 10 business days (or such later
date as the Board of Directors may determine) following the commencement of a
tender offer or exchange offer, the consummation of which would result in the
beneficial ownership by a person of 20% or more of the outstanding Host REIT
Common Stock.
 
  "SAR" means stock appreciation rights.
 
  "SDAT" means the Maryland State Department of Assessments and Taxation.
 
  "Securities Act" means the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.
 
  "SFAS" means Statement of Financial Accounting Standard.
 
  "Special Meeting" means the special meeting of stockholders of Host to be
held at        on December  , 1998 at   , local time, and any adjournments or
postponements thereof.
 
  "Stock Acquisition Date" means the date of a public announcement that an
Acquiring Person has acquired, or obtained the right to acquire, beneficial
ownership of 20% or more of the outstanding Host REIT Common Stock.
 
  "Stockholder Rights Plan" means the Stockholder Rights Plan to be adopted by
Host REIT.
 
  "Subsidiary Partnerships" means partnerships or limited liability companies
in which either the Operating Partnership, the Partnerships or the Private
Partnerships have an interest.
 
  "Transfer Agent" means First Chicago Trust Company of New York, the transfer
agent and registrar for Host REIT Common Stock.
 
  "Treasury Regulations" means the regulations promulgated by the IRS under
the Code.
 
  "U.S. Stockholder" means a holder of Host REIT Common Stock who (for United
States federal income tax purposes) is (i) a citizen or resident of the United
States, (ii) a corporation, partnership, or other entity created or organized
in or under the laws of the United States or any political subdivision
thereof, (iii) an estate or trust the income of which is subject to United
States federal income taxation regardless of its source, or (iv) a trust whose
administration is subject to the primary supervision of a United States court
and which has one or more United States persons who have authority to control
all substantial decisions of the trust.
 
  "UBTI" means unrelated business taxable income.
 
  "Unit Redemption Right" means the right of Limited Partners to redeem,
beginning one year following the effective date of the Partnership Mergers,
their OP Units and receive, at Host REIT's election, either Host REIT Common
Stock on a one-for-one basis (subject to adjustment) or cash in an amount
equal to the market value of such shares.
 
  "UPREIT" means an umbrella partnership real estate investment trust.
 
                                      206

<PAGE>
 
                         INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
The following financial information is included on the pages indicated:
 
                        HISTORICAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                           PAGE
                                                                          ------
<S>                                                                       <C>
HOST MARRIOTT CORPORATION
 Report of Independent Public Accountants................................    F-3
 Consolidated Balance Sheets as of January 2, 1998 and January 3, 1997...    F-4
 Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Fiscal Years Ended January
  2, 1998, January 3, 1997 and December 29, 1995.........................    F-5
 Consolidated Statements of Shareholders' Equity for the Fiscal Years
  Ended January 2, 1998, January 3, 1997 and December 29, 1995...........    F-6
 Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows for the Fiscal Years Ended January
  2, 1998, January 3, 1997 and December 29, 1995.........................    F-7
 Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements..............................    F-8
 Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet as of June 19, 1998 (unaudited)....   F-32
 Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Twenty-Four
  Weeks Ended June 19, 1998 and June 20, 1997 (unaudited)................   F-33
 Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Twenty-Four
  Weeks Ended June 19, 1998 and June 20, 1997 (unaudited)................   F-34
 Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (unaudited)........   F-35
HOST MARRIOTT HOTELS
 Report of Independent Public Accountants................................   F-43
 Combined Consolidated Balance Sheets as of January 2, 1998 and January
  3, 1997................................................................   F-44
 Combined Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Fiscal Years
  Ended January 2, 1998, January 3, 1997 and December 29, 1995...........   F-45
 Combined Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Fiscal Years
  Ended January 2, 1998, January 3, 1997 and December 29, 1995...........   F-46
 Notes to Combined Consolidated Financial Statements.....................   F-47
 Condensed Combined Consolidated Balance Sheet as of June 19, 1998
  (unaudited)............................................................   F-72
 Condensed Combined Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Twenty-
  four Weeks Ended June 19, 1998 and June 20, 1997 (unaudited)...........   F-73
 Condensed Combined Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Twenty-
  four Weeks Ended June 19, 1998 and June 20, 1997 (unaudited)...........   F-74
 Notes to Condensed Combined Consolidated Financial Statements
  (unaudited)............................................................   F-75
HMC SENIOR COMMUNITIES, INC., WHICH IS THE SENIOR LIVING COMMUNITIES' BUSINESS
OF HOST MARRIOTT CORPORATION (TENANT FINANCIAL STATEMENTS)
 Report of Independent Public Accountant.................................   F-82
 Consolidated Balance Sheet as of January 2, 1998........................   F-83
 Consolidated Statement of Operations for the Period from June 21, 1997
  (inception) through January 2, 1998....................................   F-84
 Consolidated Statement of Shareholder's Equity for the Period from June
  21, 1997 (inception) through January 2, 1998...........................   F-85
 Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows for the Period from June 21, 1997
  (inception) through January 2, 1998....................................   F-86
 Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements..............................   F-87
 Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet as of June 19, 1998 (unaudited)....   F-97
 Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations for the Twenty-four Weeks
  Ended June 19, 1998 (unaudited)........................................   F-98
 Condensed Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows for the Twenty-four Weeks
  Ended June 19, 1998 (unaudited)........................................   F-99
 Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements....................  F-100
</TABLE>

 
                                      F-1

<PAGE>
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                         PAGE
                                                                         -----
<S>                                                                      <C>
HOST MARRIOTT L.P.
 Report of Independent Public Accountants............................... F-102
 Balance Sheet as of June 19, 1998...................................... F-103
 Notes to Balance Sheet................................................. F-104
HMC MERGER CORPORATION
 Report of Independent Public Accountants............................... F-106
 Balance Sheet as of September 28, 1998................................. F-107
 Notes to Balance Sheet................................................. F-108
 
                    UNAUDITED PRO FORMA FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
OPERATING PARTNERSHIP
 Introduction to Unaudited Pro Forma Financial Statements of the
  Company............................................................... F-109
 100% Participation with No Notes Issued
  Pro Forma Balance Sheet as of June 19, 1998........................... F-111
  Pro Forma Statement of Operations for the First Two Quarters 1998..... F-116
  Pro Forma Statement of Operations for the Fiscal Year Ended 1997...... F-117
  Pro Forma Statement of Cash Flows for the First Two Quarters 1998..... F-120
  Pro Forma Statement of Cash Flows for the Fiscal Year Ended 1997...... F-121
 100% Participation with Notes Issued
  Pro Forma Balance Sheet as of June 19, 1998........................... F-123
  Pro Forma Statement of Operations for the First Two Quarters 1998..... F-127
  Pro Forma Statement of Operations for the Fiscal Year Ended 1997...... F-128
  Pro Forma Statement of Cash Flows for the First Two Quarters 1998 .... F-131
  Pro Forma Statement of Cash Flows for the Fiscal Year Ended 1997...... F-132
HOST REIT
 Introduction to Unaudited Pro Forma Financial Statements of Host REIT.. F-134
 100% Participation with No Notes Issued
  Unaudited Pro Forma Balance Sheet as of June 19, 1998................. F-135
  Unaudited Pro Forma Statement of Operations for the First Two Quarters
   1998................................................................. F-136
  Unaudited Pro Forma Statement of Operations for the Fiscal Year Ended
   1997................................................................. F-137
  Notes to Unaudited Pro Forma Financial Statments...................... F-138
 100% Participation with Notes Issued
  Unaudited Pro Forma Balance Sheet as of June 19, 1998................. F-139
  Unaudited Pro Forma Statement of Operations for the First Two Quarters
   1998................................................................. F-140
  Unaudited Pro Forma Statement of Operations for the Fiscal Year Ended
   1997................................................................. F-141
  Notes to Unaudited Pro Forma Financial Statments...................... F-142
CRESTLINE
 Introduction to Unaudited Pro Forma Financial Statements of Crestline.. F-143
 Pro Forma Balance Sheet as of June 19, 1998............................ F-144
 Pro Forma Statement of Operations for the First Two Quarters 1998...... F-145
 Pro Forma Statement of Operations for the Fiscal Year Ended 1997....... F-146
 Notes to Unaudited Pro Forma Financial Statements...................... F-147
</TABLE>

 
                                      F-2

<PAGE>
 

                   REPORT OF INDEPENDENT PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
 
To Host Marriott Corporation:
 
  We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Host
Marriott Corporation and subsidiaries as of January 2, 1998 and January 3,
1997, and the related consolidated statements of operations, shareholders'
equity and cash flows for each of the three fiscal years in the period ended
January 2, 1998. These financial statements are the responsibility of the
Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these
financial statements based on our audits.
 
  We conducted our audits in accordance with generally accepted auditing
standards. Those standards require that we plan and perform an audit to obtain
reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are
free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis,
evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements.
An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and
significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall
financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a
reasonable basis for our opinion.
 
  In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above
present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Host
Marriott Corporation and subsidiaries as of January 2, 1998 and January 3,
1997, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the
three fiscal years in the period ended January 2, 1998, in conformity with
generally accepted accounting principles.
 
  As discussed in Notes 1 and 2 to the consolidated financial statements, in
1995 the Company changed its method of accounting for the impairment of long-
lived assets.
 
                                          Arthur Andersen LLP
 
Washington, D.C.
February 27, 1998

 
                                      F-3

<PAGE>
 
                   HOST MARRIOTT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
 
                          CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
 
                      JANUARY 2, 1998 AND JANUARY 3, 1997
                                 (IN MILLIONS)
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                                  1997   1996
                                                                 ------ ------
<S>                                                              <C>    <C>
                            ASSETS
Property and Equipment, net....................................  $5,217 $3,805
Notes and Other Receivables, net (including amounts due from
 affiliates of $23 million and $156 million, respectively).....      54    297
Due from Managers..............................................      93     89
Investments in Affiliates......................................      13     11
Other Assets...................................................     284    246
Short-term Marketable Securities...............................     354     --
Cash and Cash Equivalents......................................     511    704
                                                                 ------ ------
                                                                 $6,526 $5,152
                                                                 ====== ======
             LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
Debt
 Senior Notes Issued by the Company or its Subsidiaries........  $1,585 $1,021
 Mortgage Debt.................................................   1,979  1,529
 Other.........................................................     219     97
                                                                 ------ ------
                                                                  3,783  2,647
Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses..........................      97     74
Deferred Income Taxes..........................................     508    464
Other Liabilities..............................................     388    290
                                                                 ------ ------
   Total Liabilities...........................................   4,776  3,475
                                                                 ------ ------
Company-obligated Mandatorily Redeemable Convertible Preferred
 Securities of a Subsidiary Trust Holding Company Substantially
 All of Whose Assets are the Convertible Subordinated
 Debentures Due 2026 ("Convertible Preferred Securities")......     550    550
                                                                 ------ ------
Shareholders' Equity
 Common Stock, 600 million shares authorized; 203.8 million
  shares in 1997 and 202.0 million shares in 1996 issued and
  outstanding..................................................     204    202
 Additional Paid-in Capital....................................     947    926
 Retained Earnings (Deficit)...................................      49     (1)
                                                                 ------ ------
   Total Shareholders' Equity..................................   1,200  1,127
                                                                 ------ ------
                                                                 $6,526 $5,152
                                                                 ====== ======
</TABLE>

 
                See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
                                      F-4

<PAGE>
 
                   HOST MARRIOTT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
 
                     CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
 
   FISCAL YEARS ENDED JANUARY 2, 1998, JANUARY 3, 1997 AND DECEMBER 29, 1995
                 (IN MILLIONS, EXCEPT PER COMMON SHARE AMOUNTS)
 

<TABLE>
<CAPTION>
                                                           1997   1996   1995
                                                          ------  -----  -----
<S>                                                       <C>     <C>    <C>
REVENUES
 Hotels.................................................. $1,093  $ 717  $ 474
 Senior living communities...............................     37     --     --
 Net gains (losses) on property transactions.............    (11)     1     (3)
 Equity in earnings of affiliates........................      5      3     --
 Other...................................................     23     11     13
                                                          ------  -----  -----
   Total revenues........................................  1,147    732    484
                                                          ------  -----  -----
OPERATING COSTS AND EXPENSES
 Hotels (including Marriott International management fees
  of $162 million, $101 million and $67 million,
  respectively)..........................................    649    461    281
 Senior living communities (including Marriott
  International management fees of $6 million in 1997)...     20     --     --
 Other (including a $60 million write-down of undeveloped
  land in 1995)..........................................     29     38     89
                                                          ------  -----  -----
   Total operating costs and expenses....................    698    499    370
                                                          ------  -----  -----
OPERATING PROFIT BEFORE MINORITY INTEREST, CORPORATE
 EXPENSES AND INTEREST...................................    449    233    114
Minority interest........................................    (32)    (6)    (2)
Corporate expenses.......................................    (47)   (43)   (36)
Interest expense.........................................   (302)  (237)  (178)
Dividends on Convertible Preferred Securities of
 subsidiary trust........................................    (37)    (3)    --
Interest income..........................................     52     48     27
                                                          ------  -----  -----
INCOME (LOSS) FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS BEFORE INCOME
 TAXES...................................................     83     (8)   (75)
Benefit (provision) for income taxes.....................    (36)    (5)    13
                                                          ------  -----  -----
INCOME (LOSS) FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS.................     47    (13)   (62)
DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS
 Loss from discontinued operations (net of income tax
  benefit of $3 million in 1995).........................     --     --     (8)
 Provision for loss on disposal (net of income tax
  benefit of $23 million in 1995)........................     --     --    (53)
                                                          ------  -----  -----
INCOME (LOSS) BEFORE EXTRAORDINARY ITEMS.................     47    (13)  (123)
Extraordinary items--Gain (loss) on extinguishment of
 debt (net of income tax expense (benefit) of $1 million
 in 1997 and ($10) million in 1995)......................      3     --    (20)